Bring Your Own Device optimize

10 myths of BYOD in the enterprise

The consumerization of IT is upon us -- dragging numerous misconceptions in its wake. See how some recent reports have debunked a few common myths about BYOD.

With all the talk about the threat IT faces as the result of the ongoing consumerization of IT, this ought to surprise you: New data is out that shows the switch to consumerization is going more smoothly -- and a lot more quickly -- than most onlookers expected. Here are the top 10 myths of consumerization, debunked.

Myth 1: Most big enterprises are pushing back

Not so. In fact, studies are beginning to show a growing acceptance of consumer tech and software services in the enterprise. Avanade recently reported on its survey of more than 600 IT and business leaders. According to the results, nine out of 10 respondents said their employees are using their own tech at work. And 73% of those surveyed called managing consumer tech and personal software cloud services a top priority in their daily workloads.

Graphic credit: Avanade

Myth 2: Apple is the main encroacher

Not anymore. Android smart phones and tablets are now first place among devices your users bring in. That's second to RIM's BlackBerry and the Apple iPhone, respectively, according to Avanade's data.

Myth 3: Users will be wasting their time with personal devices and services

If you let your users bring their own devices, they'll be trading cows, updating friends on their lunch choices, and making fun of the boss publicly. Okay, that's a little strong, but it is a myth that personal devices are all for fun and games. According to IDC, the overwhelming use of personal devices and services in the workplace is for accessing enterprise-delivered applications. Surveys indicate that the top three are expense apps, CRM apps, and ERP apps. Not an angry bird in sight!

Myth 4: Android? Run!

It may be true that Android devices are most vulnerable to attacks by malware, adware, and spyware. But there are tools on the market to help secure enterprise Android users. There are also a number of simple ways to secure Android devices.

Myth 5: Most companies don't have the resources to deal with BYOD

A commonly held myth suggests that companies that are resisting the BYOD trend don't have the time or budgets to deal with it. Again, not so. According to figures from several analyst reports I looked at, the general agreement is that nearly 80 percent of enterprises will make investments this year to manage consumer technologies, with a quarter of IT budgets targeting consumerization straight out the gate.

Graphic credit: Avanade

Myth 6: Supporting consumer-driven technology will be too hard

Well, I suppose we'll see. But C-level execs and IT pros who are making the switch say it is easier than they thought. There is a whole little ecosystem growing around the consumerization of IT. Firms like Virtual Works (founded by Citrix founder and ex CEO Ed Iacobucci) and Good Technology are just two of the many systems that make it easier to deal with single sign on, SAML compliance, remote wiping -- all the T's crossed and I's dotted.

Myth 7: Millennials are the driving force behind the BYOD trend

Another popular myth suggests that the rapid growth of IT consumerization is a result of companies courting young employees by allowing them to bring their personal devices to work. But the data from the Avanade survey contradicts this notion. Less than a third of those surveyed said their policies are designed to attract younger workers. Instead, they cited flexibility and productivity gains as the most potent benefits of BYOD environments.

Myth 8: IT will have to deal with a swamp of BYOD patches and fixes

Ninety percent of security vulnerabilities are patchable, stats reliably show. But often, though the CIO knows, the IT folk doing the real work haven't been clued in to what patches users need and when. You can't let unpatched devices lie, of course. It's critical to stay up to date on your patches. But these days, most are automatically deployed by the consumer tech maker or service in question.

Myth 9: Consumer devices have built-in safeguards that eliminate enterprise security concerns

If devices are left unmanaged, security breaches are an all-too-real side effect of the BYOD trend. Organizations need to work proactively to safeguard data and prevent attacks. A good first step is to establish a best practice system for users to keep their devices virus free, make sure they have remote wipe on their phones and tablets (if available), and enforce strong password protection. The InfoSec Institute offers a detailed list of measures IT can take to help secure employees' personal devices.

Myth 10: You can prevent BYOD in your organization

Nope. You can't stop it. It's game over and already happening, Virtual Works' CEO Ed Iacabucci told me recently, and he's right.  A wholesale revolution is coming -- easily the size of the one that hit IBM-dominated mainframe shops in the late 1970s, when users first started sneaking in Apple II computers to run the killer app VisiCalc, the first spreadsheet. Hang on to your hats!

Additional resources

About

Gina Smith is a NYT best-selling author of iWOZ, the biography of Steve Wozniak. She is a vet tech journalist and chief of the geek tech site, aNewDomain.net.

56 comments
JackieSteinmetz
JackieSteinmetz

I totally agree with this. I was just reading about the pros and cons of BYOD and came across this interesting blog: http://blog.getbase.com/bring-your-own-device-trend

The highlights include increased employee morale, increased productivity and more. And employees upgrade their devices a lot more often, so it can be a lot better than the employer refusing to upgrade and having all of their teams on old devices. I think the benefits of BYOD greatly outweigh the risks.

Jay_H
Jay_H

i agree with cmwade. I have a company device and a personal device, and I fully plan to keep it that way. I certainly don't want to be responsible for something I've done on my personal device compromising company security, and just as strongly, I don't want the company having any access to my device.

cliff
cliff

I don't understand the BYOD movement. I just...don't...understand. It boggles my mind, leaving me to wonder if my view of the world is askew. Let me get this right. First, employees make slaves of themselves by making themselves available at all hours. They check their business e-mail at home. They make work-related phone calls and text messages. They access work-related data at the office from their mobile device. They do all of this, no less, at little-to-no cost to the company. On top of this, as if to thumb their noses at common sense and self respect, they fund this "Indentured Servant Project" with their own hard-earned money. Have I lost my G.D. mind?? No matter what angle I look at this from, it makes no sense to me. The company can either stand on it's own, or it cannot. This practice of companies getting more productivity at the expense of the employee is utterly wrong. Don't get me wrong, these people have my sympathy. I know what it is to have to perform miracles with packing tape and bubble gum. But I make the best of the tools I am given and that is the end of it. I do NOT make donations to companies that are profitable, while my salary increases are being out-stripped by the cost of living going up. I swear that at some point in time I was pulled into the Twilight Zone(R). If nobody else sees the problem with this, then it must be me. I would call and make an appointment with a psychologist, but I didn't bring my smart phone to work with me.

stevenaxel12
stevenaxel12

After seeing what is going on, I think that BYOD is a big issue, and a big security issue. In the healthcare industry BYOD has opened a lot of hospitals and doctor up to lawsuit and HIPAA violations because they are texting confidential patient info, and then losing the phone or it getting hacked. We solved this issue by getting tigertext which is HIPAA complaint texting that works with any BYOD iphone android and blackberry. basically Tigertext has a closed system, that deletes the messaging after X period of time.

MidnightGeek
MidnightGeek

This discussion reminds me of a large client I got called in to regularly support. The ORIGINAL policy of the company was "As long as the work gets done we don't care what they do on the net." Then we replaced the aging firewall with an Untangle unit. When we presented the owners with just a week's worth of usage data they were shocked. They had us implement severe restrictions in the web filters. The lesson learned was a meme that applies here. "IT services and devices are tools a company uses to get a job done. If it's ours we can tell you what to do with it and how. Leave your toys at home, this is a job site." Bring Your Own Device is simply letting the inmates run the asylum. IT's job is to keep current, test, recommend, and implement manageable solutions of and for the business. The pressure for board rooms and upper management to give them what they think they need (but is really just a want of the a new shiny sparkly toy) is nothing new. Any admin or consultant who has been in the business for a week or less knows this. It's just hype. And now with a great 4 letter word... I mean acronym, made up for it by marketing, unearned validity is trying to be created. The argument is still just rehashed crap. We standardize tools for employees to ensure the productivity, compatibility, and security of the enterprise thus improving IT's standing as a profit center instead of a cost center and reducing support problems. There was a time not long ago at all, that the Blackberry was the undisputed mobile platform king. Laptops chosen for departments were based on need. Everything was written off in taxes for the business. IT stayed open to RECOMMENDATIONS and REQUESTS for changes in the solutions. Personal devices are just that, not the business's property. No write off, and not incorporated into the IT's support plans. Business is embracing is just code words for sales and marketing saying GIMMIEE and spinning buzz. So here's a message back, "LYTH to you. Leave Your Toys Home. We won't take your commissions on sales, kick you out of your nice offices, or park in your reserved spots if you simply let the IT department keep your network running smoothly and securely without telling us how to do OUR jobs. " We may not have an MBA (maybe we do but you never asked,) but you (BYOD marketers) sure don't have a MCS or even a + level cert without a boot camp. Tech is what we do and what we live, we take pride in what we do and the ease with which we make it look doing it. We standardize to keep the system safe and stable. Quit trying to do our jobs, your lack of knowledge could cost the businesses everything, or just a lot of money. So ya willing to risk your annual bonus much less your paycheck on that latest must have toy that IT doesn't have in it's support plan? Well I'm not.

Garden Gnome
Garden Gnome

Translate, please. We do not use this term in the United Kingdom (as far as I know)

jfachko
jfachko

People want to bring their own devices to work because it makes them more productive in their jobs? Right. I have some beachfront propery in Afghanistan that I'd like to sell you. You must be a facebook fanatic.

radleym
radleym

...and it's been going on for years. For example, switching from rail to road transport shifted the burden of maintaining transport infrastructure from those who used it for profit, to the general public. (See also - 1 transport truck damages roads as much as 10000 automobiles).

net-essence
net-essence

Bring your own device (BYOD) programmes formalise the use of smartphones and tablets at work and enable businesses to reap the benefits while retaining control. One of the benefits of schemes to enable staff to use their own devices reduced costs. Mobile Device Management and Security are key for these projects to work - Net Essence can help your business to develop the right strategy - http://in8.eu/3hh9p8

jfuller05
jfuller05

Regardless of what I thought. It's not too bad though. They basically wanted to get their email and to have access to the security cameras (only the supervisors btw) on their phones and tablets (only two tablets). I also have their devices setup on a different subnet so they can't have access to the shared work resources.

earlehartshorn
earlehartshorn

Android is first but second to the Blackberry? Hunh?

TrajMag
TrajMag

It appears to be time for a grey beard rant. More and more I see the "X dopes" (Harsh monicker for young people that grew up in the PC age only) wanting to take computing and IT back to the stone age. OMG if we allow individuals to be individuals we will LOSE ALL CONTROL. Just a reminder BYOD was how individuals wrenched control away from the computer dictators way back when. Ask the surviving members of the MIT Model Train Club. If you don't know what that is about and your in IT you had better look it up and make it a project to learn as much as you can. The PC was a direct descendent of their BOYD split from central control. Point is: BYOD looks to be just another part of the evolution and who knows what new and terrific technology it will bring. We just have to adjust our support to include it. Look at it as a challenge! ;-) Rant over.

pfdsotm
pfdsotm

For anyone that has had to support the BYOD you already know the pitfalls, for those that have not; listen up. It sucks! Sure management will tell you that it is all that and more, well they do not have to deal with it firsthand. I bet those conducting the survey also did not talk to the real IT staff. Truth is most mangers in IT do not care about their staff; they care about what "their" boss wants to hear and what the business areas think. I know what some of you are saying, I am just bitter about something, and you may be correct. But I know what I am talking about. Let me take one area that we support, mobile. When something does not work right who gets the call? We do. Why? Because they are connected to our mail serves. When we require an update on their devices, we are required to supply the instructions and aso the support, hand holding, to back up and even talk them tru the update on the dvices if needed, and I tell you we are called upon daily. Moreover, when the backup fails because it was never done and the family vacation pictures are lost, who is to blame, well IT of course. We made them install the update. Never mind if the phone was lost or stolen they would have lost all that data as well. Time to get off the soapbox for a bit. Could this work? Possible. But until those in management take a look at the much bigger picture and define clear guidelines as to what is and what is not supported it will cause untold hardship on the IT staff that is required to support the vast array of devices. Trust me, this issue is not isolated to the company that I work for, I know of several other colleagues in other business that are going thru the same things.

Dr_Zinj
Dr_Zinj

Contrary to popular opinion amoung some corporate managers (thankfully fewer each year), employees are not their wage slaves 24/7. Their data analyst for 8 to 10 hours a day is also the chairman of the local scout troop, member of the zoning board and school board, head of a church committee, the father of 2.7 kids, the brother of 3 other family members, the husband of a careing wife, and a part time post grad student at the local university. That's enough people to require the employee to carry a personal device for voice and image communication. That's the device used the most, the one they are most familiar with, and the one they are most efficient at using. Short of racking it at the security station before entering a restricted area, they will be carrying it always. Now drop a second, corporate device on them. It has all the same functions, but operates differently. Apples are not Androids, and vice versa. You've added redundancy and complexity, usually unnnecessarily. You've added a learning curve, and a mental switching requirement. In short, you've actually hobbled your employee, making them less efficient. There really is no valid business excuse in today's environment that justifies making an employee less capable of doing work for you. That's why BYOD.

Juergen Hartl
Juergen Hartl

towards the total enslavement of the employees

HypnoToad72
HypnoToad72

What will stop certain users from rooting or jailbreaking, how secure are the apps that supposedly create a tunnel into protected content, et cetera? Can a 3rd party keyboard be used on top of the app that creates the tunnel and siphon off data? The fun is about to begin... but don't blame the users for giving them the responsibility because you let trained staff go out the door to "save costs" by going this route. (I've barely scratched the surface as to reasons why nobody should think it's "fine", but whatever...)

cmwade1977
cmwade1977

I am confused, why would anyone want to BYOD? Really, my personal device is well....just that, personal. I don't want to start getting mixed up with this is personal, this is business stuff on my device and then what do I do with the business software if I were to go to another company? No, it is much better to let businesses provide you with the tools you need to do your job.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

BYOD isn't about companies getting more productivity for less money it's about users not wanting to be restricted especially after many years of not being restricted From DOS 1.0 to win 3.11 WFWG, 9x, NT3.1 - XP with the exception of win2k which had the power users group that didn't break functionality but allowed for certain non intrusive restrictions however, since win vista / win 7 now have LUAs that actually work without breaking most current software users now can't install anything, update anything, etc. without the administrator's password that's just great when you're still sitting on flash v.9x and should be on the current v.11.2 under XP LUA didn't work without a whole lot of wacky permissions hacking as the power users group was deprecated and very difficult to get working again, so the XP norm. was, "everyone's an administrator" just not the domain administrator since win vista / win 7 users are now running as LUA they, - are sick of win 7 Limited Accounts that can't do anything but pointy, clicky , typey - are sick of corporate spyware, that logs everything they type etc. - are sick of web restrictions (you can't visit this site etc.) - are sick of waiting on IT to get stuff installed or updated etc. and the list goes on ... with BYOD no one is monitoring usage, no one is blocking App install or updates no one is waiting for IT to get off of their duff to install the required apps or updates etc.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I disagree with your assertion that this is being pushed by device manufacturers. This is being pushed by employees, and it isn't new to tablets or smart phones. Employees have been wanting to bring their personal laptops to work for over a decade. Look at the advertising campaigns for smart phones, tablets, etc. They show people using these devices to screw around in a variety of ways, but what they never show is people using them to do actual work. There are a couple of business-oriented ads for cloud services, but none for the devices to access the cloud. Some toy ads are even set in the work place, but show people doing everything with them EXCEPT work; hardly an approach aimed at getting corporations to allow BYOD.

zielinir
zielinir

It's called consumerisation here in UK, but BYOD is becoming also popular

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It's a variation on an older abbreviation, 'BYOB', or 'Bring Your Own Bottle'. The older phrase means the host of the party will not be providing liquor but guests are free to bring their own. 'BYOD' is the trend of employees wanting to bring their own smartphone, tablet, or laptop to work, and the issues related to connecting those personal devices to company networks.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

the first couple of sentences. If it's young people reverting to the Stone Age (and I debate that they're the only ones), are you saying they're doing it by supporting BYOD? Is your second sentence sarcastic? It's one thing to have splinter cells in R&D; they're self-supporting and are usually working toward a common goal. It's another to have to support rogue users running multiple platforms, operating systems, and apps.

n.gurr
n.gurr

"so you cannot get email on YOUR phone? Here's the guide - our email servers are working and it works on OUR phones, bye." Better to have a choice of internal device and a clear usage policy in my eyes, same in all areas really.

Worth2Cents
Worth2Cents

Our group started getting some of that crap back when pagers went out in favor of cell phones. Users thought that by giving the company their cell number, the company should pay the bill for all the "work-related" calls they made or received. Legal said, "H to the ell, no!" Legal said the same thing about Blackberry service and lost/stolen personal laptops taken on company trips. And when VPN was rolled out, Legal had our back about IT messing with users' home PCs. So, users know they can't sue the company into buying them an iPAD 3 because they believe IT broke their iPAD 2.

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

I'm a tech writer, trainer, guinea pig, superhero kind of worker. After one of our sys admins brought in a Citrix-connected iPad about 18mo ago and started doing remote admin work on it while in meetings, people (once they got over the "WTF is Terry doing, playing games?" kneejerk reaction) took notice. Now, we're evaluation BYOD and how we can support it. You know what I've already gotten to do? Write "How to connect your iPad/Android to wi-fi" instructions. We've also had a lunch-n-learn session for people at work who don't know how to use their phones. Our infosec guys are nagging us to tell users how to keep their phones secure and change Bluetooth settings. Someone else has asked for an internal mobile device support SharePoint site (like the one I created for our BlackBerry users two years ago, which has seen maybe a dozen hits since then). I've often promoted the idea of cracking the door to BYOD, but now that I've looked in that door, I think I'm ready to close and lock it again.

n.gurr
n.gurr

your company loves 'your' freedom. All the problems are 'owned' at your end. Most specifically you now cannot get away from work. So many times when people pick up work email on their personal devices they have worked on something far out of work hours. Much better to learn something new and then leave work at work (phone in office draw (or dock) and separate e-mail accounts is my suggestion.)

sharonam
sharonam

I see it as freedom actually. when designed properly, BYOD approach actually frees you from a few things: carrying around many devices, having to learn new SW cause you can't use the ones you are already familiar with on your own device. and most importantly - corporates need to use a solution that separates between personal and corporate. As I indicated in my comment above - check out Cellrox.com

Worth2Cents
Worth2Cents

Yeah, it's risky, just like a bank could be robbed, or a store database could be hacked, or your credit card RFID could be read without the thief ever touching you, but what are you going to do? Close all your accounts and start carrying wads of cash? No, because the total benifits of e-cash and credit out-weight the risks. At my company, the employees are becoming increasingly mobile, which means data has to travel, too. The result: stolen/damaged laptops, data residing in multiple unprotected locations, data well passed retention still lurking around (the guys in legal woke up when they heard this one). BYOD solved two major problems--It kept the data on the servers and off that company laptop hard drive, and users tended to take care of the devices they had to pay for.

jsreilly
jsreilly

For me, I'd love to bring my own tools in ... IT doesn't provide them! I'm in marketing: my job is to update the website, maintain our social media connections, and deal with our database. I get zero support for all three. I had to have my VP complain to the SVP of Operations (2nd in command) to get Firefox on my computer because our website CMS vendor (chosen by our IT department) told me that they will not support IE 6 on WinXP SP3. They support Firefox and Chrome, which they explained to IT during the bidding cycle. So, my IT department is hell bent on being in the way... which means I do as much work as I can from outside the office - and would prefer to bring my own device.

rhonin
rhonin

Great example: I have a SGS2 LTE, my company wants us to use a Blackberry. I can get work email and calendar on my personal phone. I can get work email and calendar on the Blackberry. I cannot get personal info on my Blackberry. I can get personal info on my SGS2. Why would I want to carry both?

reggaethecat
reggaethecat

Your company provides you with decentkit. If however, like at my employer, they give you a five year old XP PC and an old Nokia 6310i phone which can call, text and do nothing else, it's no wonder people want to use their own kit.

n.gurr
n.gurr

They call it work. And IT gives you the tools to do work - if others are needed the thing to do is ask and IF there is a real need you get those tools. Any department worth it's Salt should be keeping versions of software up-to-date. Best place I worked for this allowed users to write to one directory, install nothing and have only one hour of internet access unless it was on allowed sites, ie suppliers sites. There was great productivity and much less admin cost. Btw as a temp on their helpdesk I did not have admin rights - that's how far it went.

TrajMag
TrajMag

Was being a little sarcastic but just looking at commentary from what appears (maybe - maybe not) people that are too young to know about sitting at a key punch machine for days and then have to stand in line waiting for the dictator behind the window to run your program, if they happen to like you. My observation is that some modern IT personnel are strongly trending back to those days of total control. We fought long and hard to bring the technology out of "The Dark Ages." Not a big deal but personally wary of centralized control. BYOD is simply part of the technological evolution. An extension of "Personal" in PC. I agree that adds some real serious concerns for configuration, security and support. It's going to take another step in system development to solve the challenge just like about 40 years ago. Difficult but not a problem. BTW, I solved my wait at the window. I learned how to be on the other side and then helped those that remained where I had been.

jsreilly
jsreilly

Though I agree with your legal department in theory, if you purposefully remote in to a personal computer, and do something to impact the functionality of that computer NOT related to work, or on work hours, or while the computer is being used for work, you could very well be committing a computer crime. It would be the equivalent of a manager going over to an employees house at night, after work, walking right in, and making sure they were in the company approved dress code and weren't drinking alcohol. Massive invasion of privacy. The courts frown on that. As does the ACLU. So I'd be VERY careful with that kind of policy.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

So IT is expected to support multiple apps that do the same thing? Apps that may potentially generated incompatible formats?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If your IT department is still stuck on IE 6, the company has bigger problems than BYOD. I assume the CMS vendor will support newer versions of IE; if they support is FF and Chrome without supporting IE at all, that's another problem.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Why pay for one when the company is willing to do it for you? What personal info can't you get on the BB?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Often what people perceive they want is different from what IT has demonstrated to be what they need. I have a user here who adds every printer, including a couple that he doesn't know their location. He also insists he needs every application everyone else has, regardless of licensing or his ability to use them (or even know what they do). Your profile says you're in network admin, and I agree that the gear you describe is woefully inadequate for your job.

lehnerus2000
lehnerus2000

"[i]Users opened this door.[/i]" True enough (in this particular case). I'd replace the word "users" with "idiots" though. Not all users are idiots. :)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

it's because BYOD advocates screamed their desires to use their own devices for work purposes. Users opened this door.

lehnerus2000
lehnerus2000

"[i]... BYOD a) shifts the cost of hardware to the employee, ...[/i]" Exactly. Businesses want to make "money for nothing", they don't want to pay for anything (e.g. security). How long is it going to be, before you [b]will have to own[/b] an iPad (or W8 tablet) and a smart phone, to even be considered for a job?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The keyboard was the exact width of the monitor, so you could put it on top to get it out of the way.

TrajMag
TrajMag

I have also given considerable thought in these times about how "smartphones" have easily moved the cost of corporate communication equipment from the employer to the "smart" employee. If I were a major CIO what a great deal. The word "cloud" now scares the crap out of me for the reasons you note. If everything you are doing at a desk is put back into that room you know not where that makes the thing setting on your desk a VT100! The dummy now has a dumb terminal again. Let alone the compete halt in productive effort when the server goes down or the connection falters. Oh and should I mention all of your data now in the control of someone else at some other location and I know that they are constantly watching out for the security of all that data. MMMMMMMM 1984

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Some forms of BYOD can be interpreted as a return to the Bad Old Days, not as an evolution. Many forms of BYOD rely on virtual desktop infrastructure; Citrix and / or Terminal Services; or "the cloud". You remember, what you and I used to politely call the 'client - server' model (AKA 'Big iron and dumb terminals'). There's also the argument that rather than liberating the employee to use the tools he wants, BYOD a) shifts the cost of hardware to the employee, and b) increases the company's access to an employee's personal time. That's why I asked for clarification. Thanks.

Justin James
Justin James

... that any of the applications that you are worried about are the kinds that users can access from the kinds of devices that are part of the "BYOD" trend. That's the disconnect here. For stuff like that, people can BYOD all day long, but it won't change the fact that they can't run (let alone afford to purchase) those apps on their devices, so it's a moot point. Now, if you were talking about someone trying to get an app like that running on their home PC so they could work from home, that's a different story... J.Ja

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm glad you work where all applications have been moved to or converted to web-based ones. Many of the rest of us haven't. Some apps probably never will. If you want to run AutoCAD and I want to run SolidEdge, who mediates when we each generate drawings that the other can't open?

Worth2Cents
Worth2Cents

Was the interstate only designed for Chevy, or can the roads accommodate any vehicle? All IT is doing is giving you access to the data. In essence, IT has gotten out of the hardware business: Apple, PC, Android, LINUX--who cares, Mr. User, but here's the latest data. And incompatible format? There's only one format--The Web. It's the same concept as the Internet. Browsers display the content that IP-connected networks deliver. Does it matter if the source is a PC, the network rides on LINUX, and the destination is a Droid? I have users who buy new phones with every model. They buy new tablets with every model. If they break them, I get no complaints. They go chew on Verizon's ear. Meanwhile, webmail still delivers their email, and Citrix let's them use all their apps.

n.gurr
n.gurr

Helps a lot, I am in the middle of the staff pc updates. If they know that there is a four year replacement policy then that helps. Mind you I supported one manager who ensured that every time someone in his department got a new unit he had to have it and they got his new old one, even with a strict policy. This lead to a pregnant staff member getting an older desktop replacement while he got her ultralight, he looked so selfish and not to mention petty while she lugged that brick around.

jfuller05
jfuller05

I have more than a few users where I work who want what everyone else has. Someone's PC bites the dust and he/she gets a new one, then the users I mentioned want new ones, lamenting how their PCs are poor in power (even though they're more than capable of handling their workload).