Linux

10 obscure antivirus tools worth checking out

You know about the big players in the AV field -- but a number of lesser-known tools may serve your needs as well (or maybe even better). Jack Wallen runs through some of your choices.

Viruses come and go. Some of them are simply annoyances, but others are nasty little bits of malicious single-minded code that want to take down your machine or take away your data. Fortunately, there are plenty of tools out there that can help you deal with the problem. Some of those tools are well known: Symantec, McAfee, Norton. But you can also find tools that will serve you at a fraction of the cost or a fraction of the CPU processes.

I'm going to introduce you to some of these lesser-known antivirus tools. In the end, you will have more tools for your toolkit than you ever though you would have... all of which are ready to immunize you from machine-crushing code.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: BitDefender

BitDefender is one of my favorites on the list. Why? Because it has one of the best graphical virus tools available for the Linux operating system. Of course it doesn't offer just a Linux solution. BitDefender offers antivirus for both Linux and Windows, as well as for various server installations. In fact, BitDefender has solutions for mail servers, Samba servers, desktops, and much more.

2: Avira Antivir

Avira Antivir has, in many cases, found viruses where others have not. One of my favorite uses for this solution is to slap it on a Linux machine (the Linux version is command-line based, but does have a GUI if you prefer), attach an infected Windows drive externally, and run Avira on that drive. Much like BitDefender, Avira will find viruses many other solutions won't find. And because it is mostly command line, it is also quite a bit faster than other tools.

3: ClamAV

ClamAV is mostly a mail server antivirus for Linux, but it does a bang-up job. If you're hosting a Linux-based mail server, you will want to include ClamAV on it; otherwise, you risk winding up spreading the love of viruses around the globe.

4: Avast

Avast is not as much a wallflower as the other tools, but it certainly has never been crowned Prom Queen. It's an outstanding tool that offers a lot of options many other tools over look. One of my favorite aspects of Avast is the built-in rootkit check. You can't go wrong when you know your antivirus is keeping you safe from rootkits.

5: rkhunter

rkhunter is not so much an antivirus tool as it is an anti-rootkit tool. If you've never come across a rootkit on a machine, consider yourself lucky. Very lucky. Rootkits are the Mac Daddy of viruses. And if your current antivirus solution doesn't protect you from rootkits, either add a rootkit protection tool on your system or uninstall and install one that does!

6: Dr.Web CureIt!

Dr.Web CureIt! is an interesting tool in that it requires no installation. It's a simple binary file that, when double-clicked, will execute and scan your machine. The only drawback is that to get the latest definitions, you have to re-download the tool and use the newest version. But how easy would this tool be to use as a portable virus scanner?

7: ESET Smart Security

ESET Smart Security is from the makers of the NOD32 Antivirus tool that has been around for quite some time. ESET sets itself apart by being an antivirus and a firewall in one. But the firewall isn't just a standard firewall. It's a "learning firewall," in that it observes how its users use the network and, theoretically, adapts to that usage. ESET also protects you from removable data and from viruses that attempt to disable your antivirus protection.

8: ZoneAlarm

ZoneAlarm is an antivirus tool that offers something others do not -- DataLock. The DataLock portion of ZoneAlarm uses encryption on your hard drive so that it is readable only by those with the encryption key. DataLock also offers pre-boot authentication so that unauthorized users can't even boot your machine. Yes, these features can be added from the BIOS or from other tools, but with ZoneAlarm, you have antivirus, encryption, and boot authentication all in one.

9: iAntiVirus

iAntiVirus is for -- you guessed it -- Mac. Like Linux, nothing is immune (no matter how much the media and the PR say it is). And that beautiful new Mac you bought can use protection as well as that new quad-core Windows 7 machine. iAntiVirus is as inherently Mac as you will ever find in an antivirus tool. Not only is it user-friendly, it has that same Mac interface that everyone has grown to love (or hate). And what's best, iAntiVirus works like any other antivirus software you have ever used -- only it does so on a Mac. So it must be better.

10: Microsoft Security Essentials

Microsoft Security Essentials has to be on this list. After all, it wouldn't be fair of me to highlight inherently Linux and Mac tools without offering the Windows equivalent. What is really surprising about this antivirus protection is that it is free AND produced by Microsoft. Those two don't usually go hand in hand. If you want free virus protection, and you want something that will seamlessly integrate with Windows, Security Essentials is your best bet.

Recommendations?

Those are just 10 of the less well known antivirus solutionsf. Of course, there are plenty more out there. Do you rely on a somewhat obscure tool for antivirus? If so, share it with your fellow TechRepublic readers. After all, the perfect antivirus solution is still out there, waiting to be found and enjoyed by PC users and admins across the globe.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

125 comments
KristinWarbington
KristinWarbington

I've used several of the big name AV and eventually had problems with each one. About six months ago I installed ClamWin and it's so far flawless. I want to look at BitDefender though, thanks for that. http://www.instructables.com/member/DelfinaMonaco http://www.instructables.com/member/EllyTammen http://www.instructables.com/member/PorscheDetlefsen http://www.instructables.com/member/SuzyPenning http://www.instructables.com/member/LidaNiehus http://www.instructables.com/member/MelonieFreund http://www.instructables.com/member/BuenaNusser http://www.instructables.com/member/ShauntaGrennay http://www.instructables.com/member/SharaChanady http://www.instructables.com/member/GilberteCervetti http://www.instructables.com/member/JeanineSisavath http://www.instructables.com/member/AntonioAllocca http://www.instructables.com/member/LaviniaCalica http://www.instructables.com/member/LupitaContreres http://www.instructables.com/member/HaleyPayor http://www.instructables.com/member/JosefaKahoun http://www.instructables.com/member/LuciaLalla http://www.instructables.com/member/AngeliaAuiles http://www.instructables.com/member/AnglaLupez http://www.instructables.com/member/VivienFloss http://www.instructables.com/member/SerafinaColmenero http://www.instructables.com/member/LarraineDarroch http://www.instructables.com/member/DedeKeyl http://www.instructables.com/member/LoriannFriend http://www.instructables.com/member/KacieNimtz http://www.instructables.com/member/AdrianaPalombit http://www.instructables.com/member/ShelleyKetelhut http://www.instructables.com/member/ShariceLagroon http://www.instructables.com/member/EarlineHoulberg http://www.instructables.com/member/HermilaMatias http://www.instructables.com/member/CharlotteHedtke http://www.instructables.com/member/LeenaMeitner http://www.instructables.com/member/HassieRosillo http://www.instructables.com/member/SimoneCregeen http://www.instructables.com/member/TeneshaHalley http://www.instructables.com/member/RossieSankovich http://www.instructables.com/member/LeonorSchoener http://www.instructables.com/member/DaniellaSturgess http://www.instructables.com/member/CortneyArendale http://www.instructables.com/member/AngelaHuegel http://www.instructables.com/member/BernaMoun http://www.instructables.com/member/FlorGurtin http://www.instructables.com/member/ChristianaWaggaman http://www.instructables.com/member/RandeeShaver http://www.instructables.com/member/ShanikaKnox http://www.instructables.com/member/SinaRobella http://www.instructables.com/member/ElayneKrebs http://www.instructables.com/member/NatalieNumbers http://www.instructables.com/member/SabraAydin http://www.instructables.com/member/CarmaWillimon http://www.instructables.com/member/BulaBalsano http://www.instructables.com/member/KayceMcdaries http://www.instructables.com/member/KeniaLashmet http://www.instructables.com/member/NicholeMazierski http://www.instructables.com/member/LadyCieslak http://www.instructables.com/member/GildaMotteshard http://www.instructables.com/member/JeneStyles http://www.instructables.com/member/NicholCarloni http://www.instructables.com/member/TamikaHaskin http://www.instructables.com/member/MonikaEnriquez http://www.instructables.com/member/YokoPerisho http://www.instructables.com/member/DionBonte http://www.instructables.com/member/GennyCunas http://www.instructables.com/member/LanoraSides http://www.instructables.com/member/KaronCheatum http://www.instructables.com/member/WinnieRaju http://www.instructables.com/member/LavonFeeback http://www.instructables.com/member/HanhBirkhimer http://www.instructables.com/member/RaquelWeldon http://www.instructables.com/member/LizzetteQuinoes http://www.instructables.com/member/LeighaLytle http://www.instructables.com/member/AngelRegulus http://www.instructables.com/member/VickiRinke http://www.instructables.com/member/DelorisValdespino http://www.instructables.com/member/IlonaDuring http://www.instructables.com/member/RobynRamaker http://www.instructables.com/member/ConcepcionPavan http://www.instructables.com/member/KarolynPane http://www.instructables.com/member/KatheleenSkillett http://www.instructables.com/member/StephineTacconi http://www.instructables.com/member/RositaUgaitafa http://www.instructables.com/member/KathieKhansari http://www.instructables.com/member/CrissyMaresca http://www.instructables.com/member/KayleeAmerman http://www.instructables.com/member/LarueLeppla http://www.instructables.com/member/SilvaDaddabbo http://www.instructables.com/member/CandaceReinert http://www.instructables.com/member/ShenitaWhyte http://www.instructables.com/member/IsauraManago http://www.instructables.com/member/GeorgianaThormaehlen http://www.instructables.com/member/KaterineLefton http://www.instructables.com/member/LeeanneMatkovic http://www.instructables.com/member/ClaritaWittwer http://www.instructables.com/member/BrittneyWolfinbarger http://www.instructables.com/member/KatelynBhayani http://www.instructables.com/member/RoxaneCordaro http://www.instructables.com/member/GiselaZubia http://www.instructables.com/member/LashonBolser http://www.instructables.com/member/RobbiFasciano

subske
subske

Where is Commodo

jamesb
jamesb

I run IT in Dallas and without a doubt cleaning malware is our most common call. We only work on Microsoft and use a combination of Trend Micro Worry Free Business for servers including Exchange and desktops and MalwareBytes (paid for version with real time scan). With Trend Micro (as big as a pain as they can be at times) we have never had a network virus break out - in 10 years on many, many networks. On home users we use MalwareBytes and Microsoft Security Essentials (by the way - it is very fast and takes up very few resources. For rootkits in Windows use ComboFix - unbeatable at cleaning hard to reach areas.

ajhaskd
ajhaskd

I've been using Avast for the last 5 years and it has been serving me well! :)

jstinnett
jstinnett

ClamAv = useless against virtually everything! Freeware worth checking out? = MalwareBytes @malwarebytes.org

mkoelsch
mkoelsch

I would add AVG whether the free version or the subsciption version. They make a solid product allthough nothing is bullet proof.

colecrew
colecrew

CLAMAV started in Linux, and the webpage does say "Clam AntiVirus is an open source (GPL) anti-virus toolkit for UNIX, designed especially for e-mail scanning on mail gateways"; but it is much more. Today ClamAV is available in Windows x86 and x64 bit versions as well as a windows home server version (WHS). Even Microsoft's "security essentials" (great program) doesn't have a WHS client.

ronaldsauve
ronaldsauve

I use Sunbelt's Vipre Antivirus Premium with Firewall. It seems to use less resources than either Norton or McCafee that I had before. It also is quite simple to use. I have also found that their customer service is very good. Does anyone else agree, or am I being duped? I have also used Avast, but wondered if it really found everything.

choosenone61
choosenone61

Im using avg free version.Any likes or dislikes of it? thanks tj.

lpvalach
lpvalach

Try a new product ThirtySeven4. It out detects AVG and Avast. It will remove viruses, malware, and rootkits, not just find the problems. It runs lite. It has some great options like auto scanning USB drives .It can also block the use of USB drives. It has an administration console that can manage school or business operations. The price will beat all the non free antivirus products. I tried the scanner and evaluation copy and liked the performance. http://thirtyseven4.com/

pjwvieviwdhy
pjwvieviwdhy

Amazingly...or not...McAfee & Norton both failed to detect a couple worms that were present in my flash drive. MS Security Essentials caugt them right away. I'll be running MSSE alongside my other AV from now on.

snedie69er
snedie69er

I have been using Eset Smart Security for as long as I can remember, and my system nevr gets infected. Once a month my drives are scanned via a *nix box when windows is not loaded and low and behold, no infections. I am a cautious and wise internet user, not going to obvious sites that are prone to viral infections and not clicking the "Enlarge your Pe... by 75% now" adverts. In my opinion as a network techy, I would say that its simple actions such as those that users commit that account for over 40% of our networks infections. About Smart Security (SC): Having used it for a fari few years, I have come accross just about every hicup there is with this suite. In total, I would say that is just two, and both relate to POP and SMTP services. By default, SC scans all emails that arive at a PC via the POP3 and SMTP protocols and when first installed we sometimes get errors where an application (Windows Live Mail is a classic) fails to receive emails or in rarer cases authenticate to a server. The second issue is IM aaplications. These to suffer similar problems. These two problems however are solved with one simple solution, in the settings of SC simple lower the restriction level of the SMTP and POP3 protocols. Other than this, I and over 1500 users have found SC to sit quitely by ourside protecting us from our Layer8 issues without ever moaning or packing its bags.

robinsys
robinsys

FWIW - Avast is one of the few AV programs that will work on NT4. I have an old NT4 server running Avast and it works really well in spite of its funky GUI. I use it to find viruses, not to look pretty. :-)

Ocie3
Ocie3

I really can't say, but Sunbelt Software's VIPRE 4.0 is worth evaluating. If you want a firewall, too, VIPRE Premium 4.0 has a reasonable integration of the former Sunbelt Personal Firewall with the AV user interface. SPF was a somewhat modified version of the Kerio Personal Firewall (which Sunbelt bought from Kerio). Note: I am not recommending this or any other AV and/or firewall software, just saying that Sunbelt's offering is probably at least as good as most, if not all, of the better-known alternatives to McAfee Viruscan and Symantec's Norton AV.

aaantivirus
aaantivirus

Norman AV Is the Best both Corp and Homeuser. Today new viruses are spreading faster and faster as they continue to exploit vulnerabilities found in popular applications. Traditional signature-based antivirus tools are insufficient in the fight against these upcoming threats. Norman SandBox Technology is a proactive solution designed to protect against new and unknown viruses.

JCitizen
JCitizen

so I may have to retest it. However the previous version was too slow on the draw to prevent package injections, even though it recognized the zip file as malware. This was too late for my clients. ZoneAlarm was a disaster in 2007, but I haven't tested it since. Comodo does such a better job, that I doubt I'll switch. It is free too, and has a sandbox for untrusted exe files like java.

JCitizen
JCitizen

even if you discount their anti-virus, which ain't all that bad; the firewall alone with Defense+ will foil some of the worst malware going! After all, it ain't many times you can foil malware without detecting it with obsolete signature files!!

uftr
uftr

I just started using MBAM (MalwareBytes) a couple of months ago and so far am very impressed. It is free for the base version which so far has proven effective and unintrusive. The paid version provides a few extra features which so far I've not seen a need for.

JCitizen
JCitizen

however I think the author was talking about ClamAv for Linux. Linux may not need it (yet) but no sense spreading Windows viruses around with your Linux box. I don't think MBAM runs on Linux. It is an obscure Windows utility though! I think that is rapidly changing however; its reputation precedes it!

JCitizen
JCitizen

let that one go by. AVG has been a huge disaster for my clients every since version 7! I'd sooner they used Avira, and it is too slow to catch zip file injections. If your going to go free and just can't stand Avast for some crazy reason, at least use MSE, it is definitely better than nothing, and AVG is nothing - sorry! The AV/AS landscape is just getting too scary for me to stand silent on this issue!

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

I just saw that they are working together now. I just installed it on a few client pc. Let see what happens.

Pammie
Pammie

I have a friend who uses this (on Windows) & he swears by it. Haven't checked it out myself though. It's interesting though because it implements Collective Immunity.

l_creech
l_creech

Vipre and Vipre Premium both in comsumer version and enterprise version work well. Console for the enterprise version uses SQL (Express works), management is easy for everything from setting policies to allow/disallow, deploy, schedule scans, and more. And yes the customer service is phenominal. Actually talking to a real person without paying for "Gold" support that many vendors sell now, and getting results. And the sales reps are knowledgable too based on my experience with Marcus Bacher and several of my SMB clients that I have referred directly to him.

JCitizen
JCitizen

test later this season, as I think they will be testing Viper. Many IT techs swear by it; but I'll stick with Avast, as I run in combat mode in my honeypot lab, and Avast has NEVER let me down!

Ianpc04
Ianpc04

Its a great idea to have a firewall and virus scanner but only if you have full acess to them. most of the time when repairing a machine they do little or no good causing me more hastle after i have finally removed the malware. If your on a budget i reccomend these three for my list of free, but very effective solutions for windows. 1.Avir antivirus has a free personal version that works quite well in detecting and removing viruses. secondly it has this unbrella that is open when your up to date or active. and works with all windows operating systems including windows 7. 2. would be malwarebytes antimalware takes a while to scan but picks up so much crud that its worth having in your arsenal. and does scan for rootkits. 3.Superspyware antispyware. yea i know the name sounds abit suspicious but it works in scans for spyware and removal and if you want to upgrade, their pay version also has an active spyware shield that blocks you from infecting yourself. FIREWALLS ARE ONLY AS GOOD AS THE PROGRAMMER> Do yourself a favor and get a dlink router or similar. many times the firewall gets in the way and causes havoc on your machine,or blocks programs that you sould actually be allowing acess to the internet also it eats up resources and is only limited to that piece of hardware. you can mod a dlink router to run linux , firewall, wireless acess points , hotspot etc. it also increases the value to a higher grade piece of hardware that literally costs hundreds of dollars more, but wait thats not all it has all the features of the higher grade models and run much faster due to the modified firmware. they do a much better job of blocking stuff from infecting your machine. and simplify the process. i picked my router up for 45$ and now i have 4 machines locally that have complete acess without the hastle of software firewalls and bad programming.

JCitizen
JCitizen

AVG. That one has been an unqualified disaster for my clients. And I'm talking about the newer versions too!

Walthy
Walthy

My wife's laptop just got hit with CleanUp Antivirus hoax, a real pain to clean up. AVG Free was installed, but I'm not sure whether it got turned off or was turned off when she got this. MalwareBytes supposedly got rid of it, but she is still having weird problems. I'm going to have to do a completely new install of Windows XP. Not fun. I use ESET Business version on my servers because it has administration and it seems to work well. I'm not sure why someone thought they were expensive. Once purchased, the renewals are very competitive. On the business workstations where we use Comcast for our internet connection I'm using McAfee with Comcast Business Class which also has administrative tools. As mentioned above the McAfee Advisor is a great free service when looking for information about viruses. The free part is a tool to sell the bosses on upgrading to a faster internet speed, it saves $30 or so per year per machine. It is a resource hog though. Finally, I am using MS Essentials on my Windows 7 workhorse laptop, since I found out about it for free. It is very unobtrusive and doesn't seem to cause any system slowdowns. I'm scanning my system now as I am writing this.

JCitizen
JCitizen

on the other AV. You can't run two anti-virus real-time protection mechanisms at the same time; you'll be playing with fire on that one. The only one I've got away with is Prevx; it runs at such a low level on the operating system, that it does not conflict with my AV, and is known not to with many of them. Prevx,Rapport,and Immunet are all cloud based AV solutions that are purposely designed to work alongside your favorite anti-virus ans still not conflict with it. I am testing Prevx and can vouch for this claim on it; at the very least.

JCitizen
JCitizen

to see if it works with v. 5, I haven't checked the system requirements.

dwilga
dwilga

Vipre is not quite as elegant as some of the others, but it has done an excellent job for me over the past 12 months. Additionally, their "home network" option saves a bucketful of cash by not paying licensing fees per PC, but per (home) network instead.

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

Does any one has an experience with immunet Protect? It's a cloud system in beta version. I installed beside MS security essential or Avira. My customer do not understand when I told them to uninstall Norton or Mc Affee until they have to fix their PC. What other AV works directly from CD beside DrWeb?(linux based)

jay.sanders
jay.sanders

I would recommend paying for the software as those extra features are well worth having.... Without them you do not get any real-time protection so its more of a "clean-up" tool rather than actual protection. With the real-time protection though it seems to do a great job and has caught several virus's that both McAfee and Bitdefender missed. Its also quite effective at cleaning an infected machine - virus's McAfee, Bitdefended and Norton all had problems removing (such as that "antivirus xp" F*&ker) it had no trouble with. I think they did themselves no favours calling it MalwareBytes as I ignored it for quite some time because I thought it was "joke" software and not a serious contender in the antivirus race... However recent experience has made me not only take it seriously but I am now quite impressed with it.

colecrew
colecrew

The Immunet Project looks quite interesting. So far the comments on CNET say that the software has a small footprint and doesn't hog resources. That is saying alot since the namebrands are hogs on both fronts.

JCitizen
JCitizen

Immunet has some pretty good features! I haven't had a chance to test it yet. Rapport is first, then Immunet next.

jstinnett
jstinnett

AVG was OK for a freebie, up until about version 7 or so anyway. Now it is a giant resource pig, doesn't prevent anything and so what's the point? If I wanted my network to have a lot of slow machines, with undetected infections, then I would get AVG!

jeslurkin
jeslurkin

[The new version seems to req v.5.1. (XP)] [I was _sure_ that I had used Avast on W2K, but haven't been able to install the new version.] EDIT: I got Avast mixed up with ThreatFire in my memory. Avast _does_ install on 2K. Sorry.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I haven't tested either one of them, but when you read the spec sheet on Prevx, it must be one of the few that can actually foil browser hijacking of the type that Zeus and Spy-Eye variants have been attacking banking clients lately. No keyboard or screen capture can take place without your permission, and only allow communications can happen between you and the SSL site you are on. I works with all major browsers and installs and operates and such a low level to the operating system that I doubt it can be defeated by infected systems. These are the new good designs that at least claim they can thwart malware even on infected PCs! I've been testing Prevx and it seems to do what it claims so far. I'm very impressed at the heuristic capability and the ultra fast scans and cloud capability! One [b]WARNING:[/b] do not use Prevx as a remover, this is what gets it in trouble with amateur users on CNET! I only use it as an alert system. I usually use CCleaner to get rid of the malware. I have not tried your submission or Rapport, but I'm told Rapport makes similar claims as Prevx. If I'm not mistaken, Prevx is one of the oldest utilities or companies around. I seem to remember that name way back in the Win 3.1 DOS days! Although they say they were founded in 2001, I think that is when they became a limited private company(LTD). [b](edited)[/b] I've since tested both products - Prevx flunked all screen capture and keyboard attacks, so why should we believe any of their other sweeping claims? Rapport installed with KeyScrambler is probably more effective. Keyscrambler passed all six of the tests I performed with the spy test tool referred to in another TR article. Although the newest versions of Prevx 3.0 are designed to work with Rapport, I suspect that some kernel overlap/conflict may happen, and would not try that as a combination. I'm currently working with Rapport support to solve IE8 hang issues, on Vista x64. There don't seem to be any issues on Mozilla or Chrome, so far.

page1strategies
page1strategies

I was a huge proponent of MSE and Avira until I downloaded a trial of G-Data Total Care (because it ranked in the top results of the most recent AV comparitives report I had come accross), and the program has been excellent. It's lightweight, includes a rootkit scanner, updates fast, and has excellent detection capabilities. Definitely worth a try.

JCitizen
JCitizen

why they didn't just call it MBAM! At least that sounds like using a 12 pound sledge to get the job done! :) Some other joker probably owns the trademark for that!

JCitizen
JCitizen

I figured it was his server. Thanks deep! :) I should be a little less paranoid, but modern developments in the malware war keep me pretty feisty! ]:)

JCitizen
JCitizen

in my opinion. It is bad enough that the criminals know this site is not in their best interests. I imagine it is attacked at least as often as Brian Kreb's site. FYI - I'm not clicking on his avatar or pseudonym either. Just the post link(subject line).

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

No sign of embedding in the message body.

JCitizen
JCitizen

the fact that an embedded object is in your post link! Is that your server? X-(

JCitizen
JCitizen

This is my AVG face - X-(

JCitizen
JCitizen

That is interesting!...I still have some clients that use those OS!

JCitizen
JCitizen

for such tools. Even if it does have some false positives, at that point those don't matter.

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

I will download them and test them with my next pc cleaning. What about Immunet Protect? I saw it in another article and some one mentioned it.

JCitizen
JCitizen

on her PC - I recommended it to her for XP. However I had trouble getting it to work on Vistax64, I think because of the powerful HIPs system. I imagine running the install as XP compatibility may get rid of that problem. Support was pretty good, but I had already purchased Avast Pro. v 5 by then.

kevaburg
kevaburg

The only thing that put me off before now was their circus of a promotional effort at CeBIT where people answered questions and won lolipops and umbrellas..... I did need the umbrella though that day...

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