Linux

10 predictions for open source in 2013

The end of 2012 is in sight, and predictions about the new year are starting to run rampant. Jack Wallen weighs in with his open source forecast for 2013.

It's that time again, ladies and gentlemen: Time for the predictions to start rolling down the pike. With open source, prognostications tend to run toward things like "world domination" and "the year of the desktop." Most predictions fall flat. But that doesn't stop us from diving headfirst into the murky waters of the future. And sometimes, a gem will appear that actually nails it.

So with that in mind, I wanted to hop into my Linux-powered TARDIS and offer my own predictions for 2013 and open source. You might find some repeat offenders from previous years. You might even find some entries here that knock you for a loop. Are you ready for the future?

1: Finally breaking double-digits in market share

Linux is already at 9% market share in the enterprise market. 2013 will be the first year that the open source platform reaches double digits. Though Linux has had a much easier in-road at the enterprise level (they actually get it), Linux has typically struggled with the small to midsize market. 2013 will also be the year Linux finally breaks the double-digit barrier for the SMBs, in part because of growing discontent with Windows 8 and the rising cost of Microsoft products.

2: Ubuntu taking over as default desktop platform for a major company

It's already happened within one of the largest companies in the world (Google) and will happen again. This time around, the company won't be as tech-savvy or tech-centric as Google, so the win will be all the more profound. Which company this is remains to be seen -- but I believe it will be based in the United States and will begin a major shift in the way the business world perceives Linux.

3: Linux gaining major ground as a gaming platform

Thanks to Valve porting Steam to Linux, there will be a major influx of games coming to the platform. Because of the reliability of the kernel and OS, both users and console designers will begin to migrate to the platform. Once this ball gets seriously rolling, the effects will begin to trickle up to the desktop and affect market share of the Linux desktop.

4: Ubuntu on smartphones

Mark Shuttleworth has been pitching this for a while, and I believe 2013 will be the year it happens. There is already a company, NexCrea, that is working on an ingenious set of devices (laptop and tablet) powered by a single Ubuntu-powered smartphone. Granted, this is just an idea at the moment -- the company is still looking for funds. But Ubuntu on Android is indeed happening, and 2013 should see this project come to complete fruition.

5: Demise of a major distribution

This is one of those predictions I hate to offer, but I believe one of the "major" distributions will have its financial backing cut and will either be forked or will die. My guess as to which distribution will go the way of Corel Linux is that it will be Mandriva Linux. This distribution has been on the outs for a while now, and with the fork, Mageia, gaining momentum, Mandriva will finally close up shop this coming year. The good news? The loss of Mandriva will mean next to nothing to the overall landscape of Linux and open source.

6: Fedora switching to a rolling release

This has been a hot topic within the Fedora community. Because Fedora can't seem to meet release deadlines, it continues to falter in popularity. This will cause the developers to finally realize they must keep up with distributions that manage to smoothly release on time. The only way for this to happen with such a bleeding edge distribution is to adopt a rolling release. This will not only keep Fedora on time, it will keep users with the most up-to-date software all the time.

7: First Linux-specific tablet releasing

Mark Shuttleworth made a brilliant move when he adopted Unity. This interface was designed for everything from servers to tablets. If Canonical plans to get an Ubuntu tablet to the market, 2013 will have to be the year we see product on shelves or the idea might as well be scrapped. The tablet market is already dominated by two major players that will only continue to gain momentum. For a Linux tablet to succeed, it must be released early in 2013 and must hit the ground running.

8: Linux revenues reaching two billion

That sounds like an exorbitant number for open source software. The truth is, Linux can (and does) make money. In 2013, open source-related sales will break the two billion dollar mark -- and do so easily. With Linux revenue expected to exceed $1.2 billion, the rest of the open source world will pick up the slack and push the number over the big 2. Once this happens, no one will be able to deny that Linux and open source have arrived.

9: Firefox OS releasing

The mobile platform few have heard about will release in 2013. This is Mozilla's HTML5 take on the mobile device OS and intends to adhere to strict open Web standards. This project is based on Mozilla's Boot To Gecko and will create an environment where every application on the device is HTML5 and won't be hampered by middleware layers forced upon customers by providers. If this project delivers as promised, it could make a LOT of mobile customers very happy.

10: TCO going away

For the longest time, detractors cried out "TCO" to help invalidate any progress Linux has enjoyed. The idea that Linux is "too hard" for the average user quickly negates the lack of up-front software cost. As of 2013, that idea dies. Why? Because the Linux desktop has become as easy to use as any other platform. No matter their skill level, users can sit down in front of a Linux desktop and be up and running quickly. This coming year will finally (thankfully) see the end of the TCO FUD tossed around by the naysayers.

Your take

Those are my predictions for open source in the year 2013. Bold? Maybe. Accurate? Who knows. It won't be until this same time next year that we'll be able to look back on these words and say I was "dead wrong" or "spot on." What do you think? Do any of my predictions hold water? Or do you have your own predictions for open source in 2013?

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

87 comments
aboba0
aboba0

Until there is some basic change in the human gneome I don't think fud will disappear. It's a behavior that's been around forever and shows no sign of disappearing.

Peconet Tietokoneet
Peconet Tietokoneet

Laughable Linux milesbradford@... 10th Dec http://www.techrepublic.com/forum/discussions/102-397902-37239 Hello milesbradford@. You are not very good at knowing Gnu/Linux OR free software are you!!! If you read more into the "Apple operating system software" you will find that it (Apple operating system software) is derived from the BSD tree of which is from Unix. Linux is related to Unix. So the "Apple operating system", although closed source, had come from free software. The laughter is on you now "milesbradford@". Time to read some history books on the subject, so go and read. :) :)

AES2
AES2

Steam is one game, and I suspect it will work just fine on Windows 8 Desktop. I don't expect Halo for Linux soon, but beyond that it'll take a lot of really hot games only on Linux before gamers give up their Windows platforms and the Windows games they already paid for.

Dethpod
Dethpod

Ever hear people argue about Frigidaire or GE or SEARS or hammers or saws? If you did you would think it was pretty freakin stupid. That is what you all sound like.

evan.summers
evan.summers

I'm sure Canonical designed and developed Unity, rather than "adopted" it per se, altho you might have meant they adopted their own "experimental" netbook UI as their mainstream UI for all screens including the desktop.

sonnystarks
sonnystarks

Until Linux (any version) makes it possible to click, download, install without additional searches or steps, it will never take a share of the commercial mainstream market. Example you can try... Pretending you know nothing about Linux (any version) or better yet, let your non-techie mother in law, find, download and install the driver for the Epson Perfection V200 Photo Printer. To do this, I had to first, find it. Secondly, had to go, search for and learn how to download and install the dependencies. I had to click, read, attempt to interpret cryptic code to find out which one I needed, read some more, find another dependency at another website, download, attempt to install, deal with another cryptic error message... Now, have that same person go to a printer's website and download and install a modern Windows HP print driver of his/her choice. Click, download, install, run. Until these problems are rectified, no version of Linux will ever match the ease and comfort level of basic computer users. This, my friends, is the 97% of the population who do not turn on their computers just to tweak them but to get actual work done. After 4 hours, I finally got the V200 Linux driver installed. I pray it never corrupts as I do not want to go through all that hassle again!

roy.evison
roy.evison

all, Linux stroke gnu/linux does not have a single publicity machine behind it so few want it. What are Ubuntu (canonical) doing? What has happened to 'Wayland'? It seems they, canonical, are doing a track and trace event that might bring them revenue but why? It does seem futile to let one, or a few , privileged sellers dominate the market.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Losing the TCO seems extremely unlikely. Just a simple example, even just replacing a Windows computer with an identical Windows computer can cost me a week in productivity reinstalling and updating all my programs. Linux has no advantage in this area except that maybe you can script some of your installs instead of having to baby sit and CD switch.

TsarNikky
TsarNikky

The longer Microsoft mucks around with Windows-8, in trying to make it a premier OS for all sorts of totally different platforms and uses, the better the opportunities for some open source OS to come along and replace Windows. The concept of an "ecosystem" made Apple great in the consumer marketplace but not in the business marketplace. Why does Microsoft want to copy Apple?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Is arguing about makes and models of cars stupid? Don't tell the gearheads. People will always have opinions, especially about the tools of their trades. You'll have a hard time convincing me it's as easy to find drivers on HP's web site as it is on Dell's, 'cause it ain't. APC's UPS replacement batteries are better than the ones from Interstate; the terminals on the Interstate batteries required adapters for the UPS connectors. But if we're all pretty freakin stupid, why are you bothering with us?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

when they start arguing Craftsman or Snap-on. Or around shooters when they start discussing the "best" firearms manufacturer. It's human nature. Go with it or ignore it,but it's there in us all.

janitorman
janitorman

Sears does not manufacture any of their products, instead they are all made by the other leading manufacturers, often with added features. They are then rebranded with the Kenmore (or other) brand name. http://www.appliance411.com/purchase/make.shtml Yes, there are differences in brands of appliances, but some of them are made IN THE SAME FACTORY in CHINA for different companies, side by side, from the same blueprints. What's the world coming to?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

they make stupid products that don't work as they should or don't operate within the required industry standards.

cwarner7_11
cwarner7_11

Strange- every time I have purchased new hardware for my Linux boxes (printers, monitors, digitizer tablet, data acquisition equipment, web cam, etc.), it has been mostly plug and play. I haven't had to search for a hardware driver since leaving the Windows universe...

bobc4012
bobc4012

I am not sure which distro you are referencing, but most Debian-based distros (e.g., Mint, Ubuntu, etc.) have the Software Center and the Synaptic Package Manager. You do not need to do a google search, download the application and then install it. With the Synaptic Package Manager, you do have to type in the package name (akin to the google search), but once you have the list of packages, select the one you want, click on "Apply" and it downloads and installs it automagically. Likewise when you want to get something from the Software Center. Enter the name, select the package and click on "Install". Granted, if you can't find what you want in either of those two places, you can download the DEB package (if Debian-based) or the RPM package (if RedHat-based), click on it and it gets installed. Most Distros will support either or both and that support is normally installed now-a-days. And 7-Zip will handle nearly all "zipped" files (Linux and Windows).

bobc4012
bobc4012

On distros like Ubuntu, there is (or was) an upgrade ability from release to release. You had the option to upgrade every 6 months when the next release came out (every April and October). Since i have not gone beyond 10.10 with it, I can't say for certain they carried this through with the Unity releases (11.04 and beyond). When you were notified there were updates you could download, the update process had an "Upgrade" button displayed when the next release came out. Clicked on it and the upgrade took place.

eldergabriel
eldergabriel

Without proper imaging infrastructure (sometimes even with), windows system reloads are usually a time-consuming p.i.t.a. I've become a big fan of installing from usb flash drives, tho; much faster. The scripting / automation for linux comment, I can personally attest to. No licensing or "activation" issues, either. That alone is worth the low price of admission. ;)

daboochmeister
daboochmeister

Does this no longer work? It makes a LiveCD out of your current install (including everything in /home, if you want), and you can install to a new computer from that LiveCD. Couple hours, soup to nuts. Or most of the time, just making and using a Clonezilla image will work (unlike with Windows, where the different hardware will trigger licensing issues).

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

the people at Microsoft have absolutely NO INNOVATION capability or original thoughts, never have, never will. All the changes in Windows for then last decade or so have been stuff copied from various versions of Linux three or four years earlier, or stuff stolen from others, or stuff copied from Apple. Hell, even the horrid Win 8 is copied from a variant of Linux a few years back, but the Linux version did it better - and they decided it wasn't going anywhere.

AES2
AES2

I'm not a gamer and didn't know that Steam is a platform. Thanks for the info. Although he said nasty stuff about Modern UI that he won't port Steam to, almost any program that runs on Vista or 7 runs on 8 Desktop. Is there something about Steam that won't run on Windows 8 Desktop? And if it's a platform won't its game developers demand support for the overwhelming majority that they can sell to? I believe your statement that many great games already play on Linux, but I know a lot of gamers who have sunk Real Money into massive collections of Windows games that they're not going to give up. I know lots of Linux users at work but when they go home they play games on Windows, dedicated consoles, or phones. With Client Hyper-V in Windows 8 it should be pretty easy to set up a Linux system running on Windows 8 to run Linux games that aren't available for Windows. With that Windows 8 just might help accelerate Linux use, but it will take some time. This thread is in response to predictions for 2013. As much as I'd like to see Linux grow beyond the server and appliance markets, I don't see gaming on Linux growing much next year.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I worked for a lawnmower manufacturer that manufactured Craftsman products, among several other proprietary brands for other retailers. All plants were located in the US. Identical products except for the paint schemes, decals, manuals, and cartons. This has been common practice in US manufacturing for decades and has nothing to do with China.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I am currently using 320GB on my dev machine, it would be difficult to burn that to a CD. Drive cloning would work, assuming the hardware was identical. I imagine an experienced Linux machine would have the same file size issue. But as I understand, Linux re-detects hardware changes at bootup, so cloning would work fine.

Dethpod
Dethpod

But anyone that makes sweeping statements like the one below, in absolute terms none the less, about an organization that includes thousands of people is clearly... what is the word I am looking for? Oh yes... stupid. >> the people at Microsoft have absolutely NO INNOVATION capability or original thoughts, never have, never will.

milesbradford
milesbradford

Microsoft is and always has been a company based on synergy. While IBM and Apple wanted to corner the market on their versions of what they thought was a better OS than what Microsoft had -- they never really opened up the market to other businesses for making money off their OS's. For a price Microsoft has always been willing to allow any business to have under contract a inroute to Microsoft's source codes. Not all -- but, the ones needed for developing user softwares and drivers for equipment. Windows has basically done the same thing with the Linux world of softwares. Microsoft initially was built on UNIX servers with C/C++. I mean this is taking you back to the day when the earth was created almost. Linux wasn't even an active part of the matrix. Rockets, space planes, aeroplanes, ships, skyscrapers and more have been built using softwares like Autocad, Versicad, SmartCam, Mastercam and done on Windows OS's. Granted -- there has been some rough growing times -- but, the world is a much better place to be due largely to Microsofts efforts and it supporting other software companies. Some movies were built on Mac's but, short of that -- Microsoft has been the guy you could rely on to be on the world building turf. UNIX and Linux have had and still have their place in the world -- but, at this point Microsoft is working on voice activated everything for the future. The UNIX/Linux world has about two or three decades of research to bring these new features to the populace via "free opensource". Can you imagine sitting in a silent work booth talking to a computer screen using Autocad and describing in detail what Autocad is to do while it creates your new three dimension drawing or edits an old one done by yourself or even someone else? Opensource doesn't even have a tried and evenly matched Autocad competitor that you can even use a freaking wireless digitizer with yet. Within the next 3 to 5 years I firmly believe a engineer sitting at some desk mouse hacking out some drawing is going to be passe. Can you imagine sitting in that same silent room creating a musical orchestration? Microsoft does nothing but drives innovation. It actually created most all the innovation of the opensource arena. Microsoft is the greatest innovator of all time when it comes to doing things faster, better and cheaper. If it had been left up to IBM and Apple -- we'd still be living in the 80's paying prices that only the wealthy can afford. And for journalists saying that Apple brought the PC to the market is also false. IBM created the PC first and then Japan created wannabe PC's and called them clones. I had my first clone a year before Apple even blowed it's nose on the market and then it didn't do much and had no apps for it -- until Jobs sucked up to Gates and Microsoft made having a Apple worth thinking about. At the same time that Apple finally came out with the Apple PC -- I was already using young CAD/CAM programs from 2 to 10 man private software businesses to build robotic parts. Microsoft was a strong innovative force in the creation of gorilla glass for touch screens. Small companies banded together to work out the issues the Microsoft put forth with it's ideas of where its heading with it's softwares -- but, nevertheless it was a huge innovator.

tbmay
tbmay

Regardless of where Microsoft stands regarding technical superiority or inferiority, they have, and have had for decades, all the momentum. People (non-techies) have no interest in new learning curves. I don't ever expect any Linux to be the going thing on desktops, and really don't care. Open Source software is doing just fine without having a sizable Desktop market share. Why does it even matter?

AES2
AES2

The old XP mode used the antique product Virtual PC, which wasn't bad in its day for a program running on top of Windows that emulates another PC. Client Hyper-V is a real hypervisor with Linux drivers for its virtual peripherals that run far better than forcing Linux to run on the primitive virtual machine presented by the old Virtual PC. I'd like to see Linux enthusiasts demonstrate how well it runs on Client Hyper-V, which might entice Windows users to give Linux a serious look.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

comment re steam porting to Linux so people can use that instead of Windows. Don't know how good the Hyper-V is in Win 8, but I do know the Win 7 XP Mode VM does NOT run all XP applications, and some of those it does run it doesn't run perfectly

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

to attempt to pull some other technologies together, but not quite working right anyway. To claim Ajax as a new technology, you may as well claim any home made Macro is a new technology. From the wikipedia article, which is as far as I'm prepared to waste time on this, we have: quote The term Ajax has come to represent a broad group of web technologies that can be used to implement a web application that communicates with a server in the background, without interfering with the current state of the page. In the article that coined the term Ajax, Jesse James Garrett explained that the following technologies are incorporated: - HTML (or XHTML) and CSS for presentation - The Document Object Model (DOM) for dynamic display of and interaction with data - XML for the interchange of data, and XSLT for its manipulation - The XMLHttpRequest object for asynchronous communication JavaScript to bring these technologies together Since then, however, there have been a number of developments in the technologies used in an Ajax application, and the definition of the term Ajax. XML is not required for data interchange and therefore XSLT is not required for the manipulation of data. JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) is often used as an alternative format for data interchange, although other formats such as preformatted HTML or plain text can also be used. Drawbacks - In pre-HTML5 browsers, pages dynamically created using successive Ajax requests did not automatically register themselves with the browser's history engine, so clicking the browser's "back" button may not have returned the browser to an earlier state of the Ajax-enabled page, but may have instead returned to the last full page visited before it. A pre-Ajax workaround was to use invisible iframes to trigger changes in the browser's history. A workaround implemented by Ajax techniques is to change the URL fragment identifier (the part of a URL after the '#') when an Ajax-enabled page is accessed and monitor it for changes. - - However, HTML5 provides an extensive API standard for working with the browser's history engine. - Dynamic web page updates also make it difficult to bookmark and return to a particular state of the application. Solutions to this problem exist, many of which again use the URL fragment identifier. - - The solution provided by HTML5 for the above problem also applies for this. - Depending on the nature of the Ajax application, dynamic page updates may interfere disruptively with user interactions, especially if working on an unstable Internet connection. For instance, editing a search field may trigger a query to the server for search completions, but the user may not know that a search completion popup is forthcoming, and if the internet connection is slow, the popup list may show up at an inconvenient time, when the user has already proceeded to do something else. - Because most web crawlers do not execute JavaScript code, publicly indexable web applications should provide an alternative means of accessing the content that would normally be retrieved with Ajax, thereby allowing search engines to index it. - Any user whose browser does not support JavaScript or XMLHttpRequest, or simply has this functionality disabled, will not be able to properly use pages which depend on Ajax. Devices such as smartphones and PDAs may not have support for the required technologies, though this is becoming less of an issue. The only way to let the user carry out functionality is to fall back to non-JavaScript methods. This can be achieved by making sure links and forms can be resolved properly and not relying solely on Ajax. - Similarly, some web applications which use Ajax are built in a way that cannot be read by screen-reading technologies, such as JAWS. The WAI-ARIA standards provide a way to provide hints in such a case. - Screen readers that are able to use Ajax may still not be able to properly read the dynamically generated content. - The same origin policy prevents some Ajax techniques from being used across domains, although the W3C has a draft of the XMLHttpRequest object that would enable this functionality. Methods exist to sidestep this security feature by using a special Cross Domain Communications channel embedded as an iframe within a page, or by the use of JSONP. - The asynchronous callback-style of programming required can lead to complex code that is hard to maintain, to debug and to test. end quote Ajax is so great it's hardly used and not all that well known about, and definitely NOT a new technological development as CSS is another way of using a script to do something within HTML but not a technology in itself.

Dethpod
Dethpod

AJAX was invented by MS. Your argument in invalid.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

hardware that's come out of Microsoft, with the exception of the original traffic management program designed by Paul Allen, has been bought, stolen, or copied from someone else. That is NOT innovation at all. Even the stupid icon and touch system in Win 8 was originally designed by others, just as Windows and Internet Explorer were. The Surface is a copy of work done by others as well.

Dethpod
Dethpod

What is the point in talking to you if you don't seem to be able to differentiate between your opinion and "truth". >> the people at Microsoft have absolutely NO INNOVATION capability It is true that MS is not known for that and tend to buy up companies that are leaders in the field rather than reinvent the wheel. But to say that thousands of people (aka Microsoft) are incapable of, and are absolutely bereft of, innovation and/or original thought is absurd. Example, MS created one of the single most important technologies in the history of the internet, on par with the hyper link: AJAX.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

regard a truthful answer to a question as being stupid.

Dethpod
Dethpod

If it kicked you in the teeth.

Dethpod
Dethpod

It is still s stupid comment.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

you're looking for. DOS developed by someone else and bought by Gates, ditto with Word, Excel, Access, and everything else they sell. Vista Aero a steal from 3D Glass. Internet Explorer stolen. The base code for MSO 2007 stolen. Sure they tweak them to make them compatible with Windows, but they don't develop them or invent them.

rmerchberger
rmerchberger

The Sinclair was marketed in the US by Timex (last one on the list). I only ever recall seeing a Timex-branded Sinclair 1000, but if Sinclair did market in the US, I _think_ it was later on in the PC wars and I had other things to drool over (Amiga & Atari ST). I could be wrong, though. I did have one later in life, but then gave it to a fellow ham for nostalgia's sake. (My call is AB8KK, by the way...) The _only_ reason I don't have my original CoCo2 (mine had 16K, soldered in the 64K upgrade myself) is because I had to sell it to get enough money to be able to afford my CoCo3 -- which I still have. I still play on it (my all time favorite game is Rogue - most PC / Linux versions of the game you could not throw potions, but you could on the CoCo version from Epyx). Dual floppy (360K 5.25 inch and 720K 3.5 inch). I used to read the OS-9 Level 2 manual just for fun. Learned it well enough to write a (not very big) assembly-language extension to Basic09. You can still get upgrades for CoCo's - head on over to http://www.cloud9tech.com/ [1] - you can get IDE/CF interfaces which work as both virtual floppies for RSDOS and as a hard drive for OS-9, a product called 'drivewire' that runs the bit-banger serial port at 115200 and emulate a floppy drive on a PC server, they have even developed a 68B09 board so you can run OS-9 on an Atari 800XL/1200XL/130XE! [1] No affiliation with the website other than being a happy customer. ... And they're still holding the annual ' "Last" Chicago CoCoFest ' - 22 years running now, April 22 & 23, 2013 is the next one. Head on over to http://www.glensideccc.com/ if you want more info. If it wasn't for the wife, my CoCo would still be my "one true love..." ;-) (Just kidding, of course.) The other classic machine I still use a few times a month (if not more, at times) - My Tandy 200 laptop. I use it for note taking and in the kitchen for recipes & whatnot. Built in Feb. '85, still going strong.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

with reminders of changing print chains, bands, drums, not to mention ribbons; or of operating decollators, bursters, etc.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

I forget how many bloody replacement characters I had to buy for the damn things. They were also very good to disable the bulk of the machinery and hide in to scare the heck out of someone coming over to see why it wasn't printing. They reach the printer and hit the button to open the case and you stick your head out, many techs had fun doing that.

bobc4012
bobc4012

I don't know if you remember the 1403 printers (came with the IBM 1401 systems). You could write a small programs and play music on the print chain. One of my favorites was the Marine Hymn, complete with drum roll e al. Semper Fi! BTW, how many cups of coffee were spilled when the printer ran out of paper and the cover raised for the change?

bobc4012
bobc4012

leave off the Sinclair? I (I believe, maybe wrongly, that Timex took it over later). Almost bought one of those gadgets back then. Then got some bonus money at work and bought a Radio Shack Color Computer (CoCo I). It ran Basic in 32K and, if you knew what minor H/W changes to make, you could activate all 64K and run OS/9 from Microware - a Unix clone that ran in 64K, including real multi-tasking. I still have it and later bought the CoCo 3 with 512K of memory (WOW!!!), an RGB monitor and a more powerful version of OS/9. I had the multipak which allowed me to hook up two TEAC floppys. I still have that too. About 5 or 6 years later, I bought a PC Jr., later added "top box" (instead of a side car) and had 640K of memory and a second floppy. Also have that one too. BTW, all three still work today - more than I can say for the later PCs that I bought.

MyopicOne
MyopicOne

...only I was in the Telecom and USG groups. WE, however, were working with HP's 9000 Series 75x PA-7000 RISC screamers of Unix desktops, with separate GPUs and memory and 8-plane graphics. Very nice machines and heavily used in Engineering environments - them and Silicon Graphics. At 1/100th or so of the cost of the big iron. Nevertheless the rest of your comments are correct. Took desktops quite a while to catch up to that big iron I/O - if they ever did. People who forget or even downplay big iron environments really needed to see some of this stuff actually work to gain an appreciation. For instance, the high-end IBM laser printers that the US Navy and (I assume) all big customers had back in the mid to late 80's. Used rolls of paper that needed two people to load, but when it started printing - lolololololololololol at anyone dreaming about a desktop printer even being in the same galaxy as that kind of speed. 2000 pages a minute (text), and it would run until the roll of paper ran out. The two paper loaders also had to unload the cut, fanfolded paper that came out. I have NO IDEA how much that cost.

rmerchberger
rmerchberger

... you actually knew what you were talking about. /facepalm Quote: """Rockets, space planes, aeroplanes, ships, skyscrapers and more have been built using softwares like Autocad, Versicad, SmartCam, Mastercam and done on Windows OS's.""" Recently? Maybe... Historically? Not on your life. I worked at GM (EDS) back in '89-'90, and we used *zero* CAD on the desktop; everything was done on the IBM 3090 and Amdahl 5890 mainframes... think about it: Desktop computer at the time: 12MHz 80286 to 25MHz 80386. Mips: ~6. (My 80386SX-16 was 3 Mips.) 2 Meg RAM. 66 Meg HD. VGA video (640x480) was just coming out, affordably at least. Coprocessors helped, but were not ideal. 0.2 Mflops, in fact. IBM 3090 Model S Mainframe computer at the time: 66.7MHz clock rate (actually rated as a 15ns cycle time); Mips: 100. Separate parallel vector processors were available that provided 133Mflops each, and each mainframe could have 6, for a total of 800Mflops. 512 Meg RAM. Each DASD (That's IBM speak for Hard drive) cabinet could hold over 22 Gigabytes, you could attach almost 1/2 a Terabyte to a system _back then_. 24 inch vector monitors with vector processors that basically provided nearly unlimited resolution. Which would you rather use? http://books.google.com/books?id=9fYFiZ7QeEcC&pg=PA319 http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~alanb/faq/Sun-Hardware-2.faq [[ Search for '80387' in the link above as it's just a text file. ]] =-=-=-= Quote: """Some movies were built on Mac's but, short of that -- Microsoft has been the guy you could rely on to be on the world building turf. """ Huh? Maybe for home movies, I've never heard of a major production house using Mac's for movie publishing. Or Windows. All the 3D rendering for the first several seasons of Babylon 5 was done on *Amigas*. Toy Story 1 & 2 (dunno about 3) and every other Disney animation before that was done on Sun Servers. (Unix) The SGI series machines (also Unix) were used by many movies as well. All the 3D effects for the first Hulk movie was done on Linux. Linux's inroads to 3D effects and movie houses are due to the fact they're very easy (just like Unix before it) to create parallel processes required for renderfarms. Windows did not have that ability until much later in the game. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Movie_Making_Manual/Linux_in_film_production#Who_already_uses_GNU.2FLinux.3F [[ As a matter of fact, if you google 'windows used for movie production' (sans quotes) the 2nd link listed is the one above. ]] =-=-=-= Quote: """Microsoft does nothing but drives innovation.""" Yes, but they mostly innovate in marketing, not in technology. =-=-=-= Quote: """It actually created most all the innovation of the opensource arena.""" Really? What are your sources? Please list them. =-=-=-= Quote: """And for journalists saying that Apple brought the PC to the market is also false. IBM created the PC first and then Japan created wannabe PC's and called them clones.""" Uh... you might want to check your personal computer creation timeline... Apple certainly wasn't the first - but the Apple 1 predated the IBM PC by almost *5 years!* Tandy (Radio Shack), Commodore, Atari, Texas Instruments, and even Timex had personal computers *long* before IBM. IBM was big in the mainframe market (roughly akin to what we would call the 'server' market nowadays) but did not introduce the PC until '81. Google "Personal Computer Timeline" (again, sans quotes) and the first link is this: http://pctimeline.info/mini.htm - or - http://www.computerhistory.org/timeline/?category=cmptr =-=-=-= Quote: """Microsoft was a strong innovative force in the creation of gorilla glass for touch screens.""" Could you please provide references / sources to that statement as well? =-=-=-= Where I ask for sources, I will admit I do not know. Honestly, I'm assuming those statements are false due to the exceptionally large amount of incorrect information within your post. Please keep in mind: I have absolutely *no* problem being proved wrong, however, and I have no _proof_ to the contrary. However, I feel I have provided more than enough proof where you *are* wrong, and have provided sources / attribution to those facts.

cwarner7_11
cwarner7_11

was actually XP- and I abandoned that, ultimately, for Ubuntu, because I found myself spending way too much time on system maintenance- registry issues, cleaning up malware, rebuilding the system because it just became unstable for no obvious reason. Upgrading a Windows system (beginning with Win 3.1) generally resulted in breaking critical apps, and rendering ancillary hardware non functional. I stopped upgrading my Ubuntu at 10.04, because of personal insecurity over the Unity/GNOME 3 trends- going directions I have no desire to go. But, back when I would upgrade the system, it was generally painless and straight forward, as installing a Linux distro on a new system (no need to seek out obscure drivers, etc. to get my hardware to work- everything just works nicely) is straight-forward and simple. Most importantly, I have never had a problem with legacy software (or hardware) working with a Linux update. As to quality of software, within the scientific community, the best, BY FAR, solutions are generally Open Source and developed on *.nix platforms. Such outfits as NIST, Argonne National Laboratories, EDF of France, as well as many universities throughout the world, release scientific analysis packages that outperform, in terms of both capabilities and speed, most any commercial package I have explored. For you CAD jockeys out there, brlCAD, released as an Open Source package by the US Military Ballistics Research Laboratory, was doing things 20 years ago that commercial 3D modeling systems are only now starting to adopt- including very sophisticated ray tracing, etc. What a lot of Open Source software lacks is the fancy eye candy of the GUI, which actually interferes with performance...

tbmay
tbmay

My actual job title is Linux Engineer...I work for a federal contractor that uses it in datacenters in mission critical roles. It is a well known fact to all of us that the only servers that just run without incident are the *nix ones. With that said, there is definitely a lot of open source crapware. People start things...lose interest...etc. It's best to stick with the known good software unless you're prepared to deal with some setbacks.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

at a time, and the majority of such have been military or flight operations or law enforcement type places. However, I can see how using a more directional mike would be useful with voice activated computer systems. but the main point of my last post was that some of the Star trek episodes make it clear that multiple people are accessing the computer by voice from different locations at the same point in time; thus showing it had multi user capability.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

how many workplaces do you know where only one person is talking at a time? How about multiple players trying to voice control a game console? My point is that voice operation has more problems to overcome than just the clarity of recognition.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

one microphone as the sound waves will get confused with more than one speaking. But the do seem to have more than one suing it at a time by being in different rooms.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

hardware designed to work with XP to work with Win 7 as they hope to sell you their latest models instead of getting your existing one to work with Win 7. Also the issue with apps is not new apps, but existing core business apps that work with XP and would cost a fortune to replace with ones that'll work with Win 7.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Some hardware vendors, on the other hand, wrote utilities for their hardware to run under XP and aren't yet developing for Win 7.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Where the crew interacts with the computer by talking to it? Ever notice how, even in the 23rd century, they can only talk to it one at a time? :D

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

command sets means I don't know what I'm doing! I wasn't the one who elected to NOT follow the standards, that was the Microsoft management deciding to do that so they could push for Vendor lock-in and make more money. They choose to build in incompatibilities to force people to pay them more money. SKDT, At least Linux has the setting where they're easier to find and allow for any easier way to adjust them. But really, turn wi-fi off after 15 minutes as a default - that's just plain stupid.

bobc4012
bobc4012

Maybe in the enterprise, but the typical non-techie will stick with what still works. Why should they run out and spend hundreds of dollars (or Euros or whatever) for the latest upgrade when they are not going to use any of the new function. Most non-techie users operate under the principal "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". Also, when they find out they can get comparable Open Source for free and does what they need (and supports the data formats of what they had been using), why buy an upgrade.

bobc4012
bobc4012

I use XP, Win. 7 and various Linux distros. First of all, the folders and application icons I have on my desktop don't look much different on any of the those systems - e.g., to the extent that the icon for LibreOffice is different than the icon for MS Office is about it. If I wanted to copy the MS Office icon into the Linux icon directory, I could and use it for LibreOffice. However, the point is an icon on the desktop is an icon. I could easily adapt every icon on my Linux desktop to look like the comparable icon on my XP or Win, 7 desktop, In that sense, it would look like Windows. On some of the current distros (and Ubuntu-based distros prior to 11.04), I can set up panels (bottom AND top). I can populate a bottom panel much the same way as the Windows taskbar. Granted, I am not going to get an exact match all the time but I can make it look close. I will agree that the underlaying Linux function may not always support the same options as the comparable Windows function, but as a whole, it will accomplish most, if not all that the non-techie types typically use. BTW, if I use WINE, I can populate my desktop with the Window applications that install under WINE and then it functions exactly as Windows. I'd also suggest you take a look at ZorinOS and find out that you can have a desktop that has the look and feel of Linux Gnome 2, Windows XP or Windows 7. You can select from the "Start" menu which desktop you prefer. Logoff and log back on. Granted, you will still have Linux beneath the surface (except for any Window apps installed under WINE). Besides WINE, I also use DOSBox and DOS Emulator to handle any old DOS programs I still use. I also use DOSBox on Windows 7 to handle stuff that ran on XP command line and earlier but won't run on Windows 7. So before you knock it, give it a try (ZorinOS in a VirtualBox VM). You may be pleasantly surprised.

SKDTech
SKDTech

That is the silliest idea I have heard since the last time I heard it. Even after years of research, development and use they can't even get dictation software to work 100% accurately. We have a long way to go before there is enough processing power packed into a small enough, fast enough package to make voice control a feasible control interface and even then it won't be practical. Who wants to work in a cube farm where everyone is talking at their computers for their entire shift? Too distracting.

SKDTech
SKDTech

No system is free of flaws.

Dethpod
Dethpod

That much is apparent.

Slayer_
Slayer_

DOS has been dead since the demise of Windows ME.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

to the OS kernel, it's still an application that runs over the kernel. Zorin OS has a few GUIs you can choose from and one of them is made to look very like Win XP.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

the easiest one was finding the well buried default security policy that turned the wi-fi system off after 15 minutes of non use. The old lady was complaining about having to keep turning it off and on to make the wi-fi work. Finding Win 7 drivers for printers originally designed to work with XP - woops, sorry don't have them because MS changed the commands AGAIN. A client has a few thousand dollars of CD data files that don't work now as the new systems have Win 7 and they don't use the same commands as the Win 98 and Win 2000 the search programs on them were created for. And NO, the Win XP mode does NOT work with all Win 2000 and Win XP software. Awaiting HQ approval to install a VM to be able to use the CDs again, but have an old box on hand to use them at the moment. Ayep, Win 7 JUST works, but only with Win 7 compatible software and hardware.

TNT
TNT

@Gisabun: You are right thet many users will not switch platform because of their existing apps. I'm not sure why you didn't apply this logic to XP users. I can't think of a single software vendor still developing for XP. User's will upgrade to Win 7 or Win 8 to keep using the latest versions of their favorite programs.

TNT
TNT

Even XP rests atop a form of DOS. Vista was the first MS OS to completely rid itself of the last vestiges of DOC, and you could still boot to a command prompt if you wanted to. The new versions of MS's Server OS allows you to forgo the GUI altogether to reduce the attackable footprint of the OS. So no, the GUI is not built into the kernel.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Resembles means nothing. Still have the different apps - or did they also duplicate Outlook Express?

Gisabun
Gisabun

First some non-technies won't even know that there is no support. Others won't care. They think they are careful enough that they won't have an issue. Even if Windows 8 sales do tank [a bit] it wont' drive non-techies to Vista. While Windows 7 is still selling, more will look for a Windows 7 system. Non-techies are use to what they have. Some small changes to go to Windows 7 isn't a problem. Completely switching to a different platform is. Apps they are familar with won't exist.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Wonder when was the last time you even touched Windows. Vista maybe? Fix problems? I can't remember when the last time I had a problem in windows 7 and it's not just me. I know plenty of clients who don't have problems. Of course you have the real support problem with Linux. Install the latest Ubuntu version [12.04] and Canonical will support it for how long before you have to upgrade? Every time you upgrade your system is down for a while during the upgrade and then you find out something doesn't work. Or maybe you want a nice MFP but drivers aren't available for Linux except maybe some odd workaround that gives you partial features. Don't tell me this never happened in Linux...

milesbradford
milesbradford

Neither UNIX or Linux has any GUI that resembles XP or anything past Windows 2000. The Windows GUI is built into and attached to the Windows kernel. That's why you can't ditch the GUI and work straightaway on the Cmd line in DOS. Linux at best resembles Windows 3.1. I remember the days of Windows 3.1 desktops and Windows 3.1 server running on Netware 3.1. You could unattache the GUI at anytime and go right into a Cmd line and get down to the dirty work that had to be done on the hard drives or driver setups. To compare GNOME or KDE GUI's to XP -- Wow -- that's an insult. I've tried to get the Linux developers to build a GUI into the kernel -- but, I guess Linus isn't haven't anything to do with that. And Windows 8 is but, the forefront of what's to come with the Windows 8 OS which is will become completely voice activated everything within a few years. A whole new market. Eventually I can see even the Gorilla glass touch screens being gone. Seriously -- though -- comparing GNOME/KDE to XP??? Wow!

milesbradford
milesbradford

Wow -- dude, if you only knew how many gigabytes of data I have lost becasue of opensource crappage. I go to bed at night and sleep restfully due to the fact that I know all my data on my Linux servers and desktops are backed up on my Windows 2008 server that I paid for. I can't afford a bunch of Windows servers but, I can afford one and that one saves my bacon on my Linux servers. I wouldn't trust a Linux FS for anything. Just a handful of weeks ago the Ext4 system revealed a new deadly flaw. I thought for years it was me -- but, I've been vindicated. It was that damn FS afterall. I still use it though. Just have to make sure all my Ext4 drives are backed up on a NTFS server. I won't go to BTRFS yet either due to the deadly flaws it's still wooing in the shadows of users being guinea pigs. Granted Windows NT4 had the same problems that the Linux world is going through now -- but, largely those issues have been fixed. Not to say "shit doesn't happen" becaue it does. Made to make a choice and I could afford it -- Windows server FS is the one I do trust the most.

michaellashinsky
michaellashinsky

I stand humbly corrected. Never again will I besmirch the good name of Monti Python. In other news, Microsoft, proving that corporations are indeed people, has been cast in the roll of the "not dead yet" guy in an off off off Broadway production of Spam-a- lot. (Of course, we all know how that works out for him...)

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

I got a number of clients still using Win 98SE and two still with Win 3.11 - none of the techs at the local IT shops even know how to load DOS let alone use it or Win 3.11. I get a lot of word of mouth business from that client group - the grey power group.

bobc4012
bobc4012

I agree that "non-techies" have no interest in new learning curves. They are already complaining about Windows 7 differences to XP and many are refusing to leave XP and when they find the magic "end of support" date arrives and XP still works, they will continue to use it until the H/W breaks. The same holds true for those who had to move to Windows 7. If Windows 8 sales turn out to be weak in the "non-techies" market, other companies, besides Dell, will start to look more closely at a Linux distro that still resembles XP (or WIn. 7). ZorinOS is one that comes to mind as Ubuntu has created the same waves in the Linux world as Metro. Plus there seems to be an effort underway to bring back Gnome 2.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

and use more sense than has been shown with Win 8

michaellashinsky
michaellashinsky

Yeah, you get that and I get that, but the dopes at M$ keep changing the UI with every iteration. XP had the Playskool interface, then Vista was all about the special effects, (7 fixed Vista,) and now 8 is all about cutting the special effects and getting back to business, but instead of staying with the tried and true UI from Win2K or XP, they go all Metro and figure the same UI for a smart phone should work on a tablet, laptop, and desktop. Doh! M$ has all the momentum, (and it has served them well,) but they are doing their best to squander it fast! Who writes their business plans? Monti Python?

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

the crappy Windows systems as we spend a LOT of time fixing rubbish problems that would never have been an issue with Windows was made right the first time around.