Tablets

10 reasons I'm dumping my iPad for a Galaxy Tab

The reviews may be mixed, but for Deb Shinder, the choice is clear. See why she's throwing over her iPad in favor of her new Galaxy Tab.

Samsung's Galaxy Tab is a 7-inch tablet that looks a lot like an overgrown Galaxy S phone, without the phone functionality. It debuted in the U.S. this month and will be available from all four major U.S. wireless carriers. (Note: Versions of the device sold outside the U.S. do have phone functionality; this is a limitation imposed by the U.S. carriers.) Reviews ranged from glowing ("It's a Tablet. It's Gorgeous. It's Costly") to scathing ("A Pocketable Train Wreck").

I bought an iPad for one simple reason: I wanted a light, thin tablet I could easily use out on the patio, while riding as a passenger in a car, while lying in bed, or while sitting on the sofa in front of the TV. All of these are situations where a regular laptop or notebook, or even the bigger and heavier convertible tablets, just didn't work as well. The iPad was the only thing on the market at the time that fit those criteria at a cost of under $1,000.

But I've had a love/hate relationship with the iPad from the beginning. I love the form factor and the ease of connecting to a network and setting up my Exchange email account. But I hate the lack of storage expansion, its frustrating inability to display Flash-based Web sites, and the difficulty of entering text on its keyboard. And it's still just a tad heavier and bulkier than I'd really prefer for the uses to which I put it. Most of all, I hate Apple's ironclad control over what apps I can install.

I've been eagerly awaiting a viable alternative. I'm a Windows loyalist from way back, and I've used Windows Mobile smart phones since I got my first, a Samsung i730 back in 2005. I still have an Omnia II running WinMo 6.5, but recently I was won over to Android, first by testing a Droid X and then by testing a Samsung Fascinate. I fell in love with the Fascinate, which is a Galaxy S phone, so I had a feeling I was going to like its big brother, the Galaxy Tab. And I was right. In fact, despite the Tab's somewhat high price, I've decided to dump the iPad for the Tab. Here are 10 reasons why.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Size

Yes, I loved the iPad's 9.7-inch form factor when I got it. That's because it was so much smaller and thinner than the tablets (Windows-based convertibles and slates) I'd used in the past. But it still wasn't quite enough. It's just a little too big to slip into my favorite small bag. Want to put it in your pocket? Forget about it. And unless you're a big, burly guy (I'm not), holding it in one hand isn't easy to do.

Steve Jobs pronounced 7-inch tablets "dead on arrival." He might think bigger is better, but I disagree. The Tab's 7.48- by 4.74-inch dimensions (compared to the iPad's 9.56-by-7.47) make it roughly half the size of the iPad. And that means it's easier to hold onto and manipulate, easier to "thumb type" on, and easier to fit into a small bag or even a large jacket pocket.

2: Weight

At 25.6 oz. (a little over a pound and a half), the iPad seems light -- especially if you're comparing it to older style tablets that weighed 3 to 4 pounds. However, if you hold it up for a moderate period of time, you find that it gets tiring. This is especially important if you use your tablet for reading ebooks. And carrying it around adds a noticeable, if not burdensome, weight to your bag.

The Galaxy Tab weighs in at a trim 13.4 oz., less than a pound. The difference might not seem like much, but it makes it far easier to use for longer times without tiring and makes it more likely that I'll bring it along at times when I might not bother to bring the iPad because of its bulk and weight.

3: Expandable storage

One of my biggest complaints about the iPad was the lack of a flash memory slot to allow me to add more storage space. Of course, Apple didn't want me to buy an SD/microSD card from one of many vendors -- they wanted me to buy a higher capacity, more expensive iPad from them. That type of blatant gouging is one of the reasons I hate giving any of my money to Apple.

The Galaxy Tab has a microSD slot that will officially accept cards up to 32 GB in capacity. I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised if we can tweak it to use 64 GB cards when they become readily available, just as we could use 8 GB cards in phones that officially only accepted cards up to 4 GB.

Another nice thing about the Tab is that the memory card slot is easily accessible -- unlike on the Galaxy S phones, where you have to remove the back to change out the card (although I give Samsung credit for not making you remove the battery to change the card, as you have to do with many of today's phones). On the Tab, the slot is on the side of the device and you just open the small cover to access it.

4: Choice of 3G carriers

The iPad has finally come to Verizon Wireless -- well, sort of. The problem is that it's the Wi-Fi only version, since Apple doesn't make an iPad with built-in support for CDMA/EVDO (the technology used by Verizon and Sprint). To use it with Verizon's 3G network, you have to buy their MiFi mobile hotspot device and then connect the iPad to that via Wi-Fi. The upside is that you can connect up to five devices to the MiFi -- but it means carrying around yet another (albeit small) component.

The Galaxy Tab is going to be available through all the major wireless carriers and will have 3G capabilities built in, so there is no extra device to carry.

5: Better Bluetooth

The iPad comes with Bluetooth 2.1 support, whereas the Galaxy Tab has Bluetooth 3.0. The later version supports faster speeds, up to 24 megabits per second. (Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR supports a data rate of 3 Mbps.)

6: Two cameras

The iPad lacks a camera of any kind. I don't really mind not having a rear-facing camera, since my phone has a camera and is much better suited for taking photos. Holding the big almost 10-inch iPad up to snap a picture would be awkward anyway. But I always thought the tablet form factor would have been perfect for video conferencing -- if only the device had a front-facing camera.

The Galaxy Tab has two cameras, a 3.2 MP rear-facing and a 1.3 MP front-facing one. And the device itself is small enough so that the rear camera will be a lot less awkward to use.

7: Flash

Steve Jobs has made it clear that he hates Adobe Flash and doesn't want it on the iPhone or iPad. I'm not a big fan of Adobe myself, but there are just too many Web sites out there that rely on Flash, and the lack of support for it can make browsing the Web with an iPad a frustrating experience.

The Galaxy Tab includes Flash Player 10.1, so you can access those Flash-enabled sites. This does slow things down a bit, but it's far better than not being able to access them at all.

8: Swype

The iPad is too big for thumb typing, and although you can (sort of) touch type on it, that's likely to result in a lot of errors, in my experience. That leaves me doing a modified version of touch typing, in which I have to look at the keyboard while I'm typing, and it slows me down. Worse, it's uncomfortable to try to do it for any length of time. Thus, I use the iPad for consumption but try to avoid creating text content on it.

The Tab, like the Galaxy S phones (and other Android phones I've tried) comes with Swype. It's a different way to enter text, by sliding your finger from key to key, and at first you can't believe it would really work, but it does. I first became acquainted with Swype when I got my Omnia II Windows Mobile phone, and within a week was able to enter text at over 50 wpm -- on a phone! I swore I'd never have another phone that didn't use Swype. After you get used to the longer distance your finger has to travel, it works fine on the Tab, and it's far less tiring than typing on the virtual keyboard.

We keep hearing rumors of Swype coming to the iPhone/iPad, but so far, it hasn't happened.

Even if you prefer to tap the keys instead of Swyping, the Tab has a feature that makes text entry much better than on the iPad: You can tap and hold a key to get a secondary character. On the iPad, if you want to type a number, you have to switch to the alternate symbol keyboard. On the Tab, you can simply hold down the appropriate alphabetic key to type the number displayed above the letter. Switching back and forth between the alpha and numeric/symbol keyboards on the iPad drives me nuts, so I love this feature.

9: Comparable battery life

One thing I really did love about my iPad was the battery life. Compared to just about every other portable computing device (other than a simple MP3 player), its stamina was amazing. I easily got close to 10 hours of fairly heavy usage out of it, and since I don't normally use it that heavily, I could go a week sometimes between charges.

This was the deal breaker on most of the alternative tablets I saw. Many of them sounded great -- until you got to the part that said "Battery life: 4 hours." I wanted something that was comparable to the iPad, that would at least let me use it heavily for a full workday without recharging. The Galaxy Tab doesn't quite measure up to the iPad in this respect -- but it's good enough. It's rated at seven hours for video playback, and longer for less intensive tasks. That stacks up well against the iPad, with which I got about eight hours when streaming video constantly.

Another plus is that you can charge the Tab from your computer's USB port, although you have to use the cable that comes with the device to do it since Unfortunately, Samsung used a proprietary connector on the Tab's side. This was a strange decision, given that the Galaxy S phones have a standard mini USB port.

10: Freedom

For those who chafe at being under Apple's thumb when it comes to software, the Tab offers something that's priceless -- the freedom to install apps that don't have to be "approved" by the phone's maker. The Android Market is a convenient and easy way to download apps, but you aren't limited to its offerings.

Of course, the carriers do lock down their devices to an extent, and depending on where you buy it, the Tab may have vendor-installed crapware on it that you can't easily remove. However, rooting the Tab is easy; there is a one-click app for that called z4root. And it's likely that custom ROMs for the Tab will emerge in the near future, as they have for Android-based phones .(Just remember that rooting -- similar to jailbreaking an iPhone/iPad -- voids your warranty.)

Summary

The iPad is slick and pretty and does some things well. I had fun with mine, even though at times I felt like throwing it into the lake. But it lacked a lot of the things I want and value most, such as the ability to expand storage, to "type" at a decent speed,and to carry and hold it comfortably for long periods of time without it becoming burdensome. I also need to be able to view Flash content and do video conferencing. The Tab offers all that, and more.

Sure, the next generation of the iPad will probably include some of these features. But there are some that the iPad is likely to never give us, such as expandable storage and freedom of choice when it comes to our apps. Those things might not be important to everyone, but they're important to me. So important that I'm dumping my iPad in favor of the Tab.

Related resources


About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

306 comments
anandsri85
anandsri85

so as per need every one help me to find out how to use that we are get more benefit of that ============================ PLR

suhaibfaiz
suhaibfaiz

No way, as for me all the reasons go other way round... I need a big screen tablet pc else i can have an iTouch, I dont use bluetooth as Wifi is much better, I use iPad for daily work else i can use dropbox which gives 2 GB of free storage over the net, I have N95 with 5MP camera with flash and 1.2 MP front camera, Swype its coming soon in iPad also. Freedom of apps is more in Apple as currently they have apps than others. In the end, if u buy galaxy u will be scraping it when iPad 2 comes....hehe

davem
davem

Most of your points seem to hang on the usual spec-sheet drivel fueling the interminable debates for and against every piece of hardware to hit the shelves. I'd love to get your perspective after you've taken your Galaxy "out on the patio, while riding as a passenger in a car, while lying in bed, or while sitting on the sofa in front of the TV." Then, tell us how much you needed that 32GB SD card, the forward facing camera, swype and all of the other items on your hit list. I suspect what you really want is nothing more than a glorified Kindle, and the smaller form factor is the only relevant factor. But please do tell us how often you use all of those great features and how enamored you are of them on a day-to-day basis once you've spent some time with the device.

JeffRuiz
JeffRuiz

I have an Archos 5 Internet Media Tablet that is running some version of Android. I forget at the moment. My problem is, is that for work there are a couple of sites that I use that only work in IE. If there was some sort of application for Android [and perhaps Droid based phones] that worked as IE, I would be fine. Until then, I have to use my work phone for 2-3 sites and I hate the phone itself :(

non-sequitur
non-sequitur

Man. Sounds like a Samsung puff-piece. Admit it, you got the iPad reluctantly, didn't really like Apple to begin with, and now you have another option. Getting a phone (even a Galaxy S) would make more sense for you.

jfuller05
jfuller05

A little over a pound and a half is not heavy. Even for long periods of time that weight is not heavy. All of the other reasons make a strong enough case against the iPad, the weight reason is almost comical though.

j3hess
j3hess

Apple = Singapore The rest of the IT world = Hong Kong

rickeclectic
rickeclectic

Great article. The only thing I think is missing from the Galaxy is ubiquitous phone service (e.g. I use Sprint) and a KEYBOARD. I really don't care what people say, there is no substitute for a real keyboard. A flipout or slide down would be great and it would not increase the width by much. Sculpted keys would help as well. As far as the Apple vs. everyone battle goes. In some ways I don't care. I bought one of the first Macs and used to love Apple, but Jobs has become totalitarian and I just don't want to sponsor the regime. The Android is good enough and getting better every day. The Apple is still currently better but I think in a year or two noone will notice the differences. It will be like folks who used to argue about Ford vs. Chevy.

ajaypatel333
ajaypatel333

Regardless of how you feel about Apple v/s Samsung, etc., I would say this is a very well written article in a long time. There's not going to be one perfect solution that does everything for everyone. There will be nuances and one will have to make a choice to live with bad ones. Just like getting married :) I do appreciate Apple for creativity and innovation and I hate them for arbitrary decisions such as making a weird browser that won't let me use half of the websites. I still have an iPhone, and most likely may end up getting iPad.. because my 2 year was able to figure out iPhone without any guidance, on his own. Now that's a good design.

mcallw
mcallw

One pivotal reason why I need an iPad over a droid device is the Cisco IPSec VPN access is licensed on the iPad and not on droid. Come on....Really? I know I can root a droid and use vpnc but I want a solution that just works, so if i have an issue with my device I don't have to deal with snotty retail workers who are going to judge me for changing my product to fit my needs. Oh, and PS, I find the Apple Retail Front way better than any wireless carriers retail store front. Oh and Apple, Verizon 3G built-in would be optimal, I am stuck with the AT&T built in 3G because i refuse to carry around an additional device, that doesnt make things easier!

mimoore
mimoore

This is a long post and you are welcome not to read it, hopefully I will get this out of my system once and for all, as my "Pet Peeve" has grown quite large and hungry. As someone who is not a tech professional, nor has the time to make all things Tech my "Uberhobby", as the market for a "Tablet" develops I vacillate between being encouraged and wishing to return to the mid-20th century. First, I don't know who the companies are making products for and who they are marketing to and why. I think most of the manufacturers don't really know either. I think the first, second, third, and fourth reasons why the iPad has been such a commercial success is (are you ready for this...) the average consumer heard about it. That's right, somebody that doesn't read Endgadget daily knew of it, at least a little. Every single advancement I've learned about since the basic laptop has been by accident. Back in the 90's all my colleagues had Palm Pilots, but by talking with them I knew that Palm Pilots would not do what I wanted them to. I was in a Best Buy (I think) looking for something when I stumbled into a fellow from Microsoft discussing and answering questions about something called "PocketPC's". Who knew!?!? Within minutes I was the proud and ecstatic owner of a Toshiba e335. Little did I realize that within 5 minutes I would be the local expert in Pocket PC technology in a major academic medical center on the east coast. (It is easy to be an expert when everybody else knows nothing!!) So, I spent the next many months (years?) figuring out how to troubleshoot the conversion for PocketWord to Word, etc. (before finding "TextMaker" software). Eventually the screen size became the limiting factor in my efficiency/productivity, and lo and behold I stumbled upon an ad for the Toshiba e800 with a 4" screen- except by the time I did, it was no longer being marketed in the US. I did, however, learn about the iPAQ's coming onto the market with more memory, more power, larger screens, so I eagerly awaited their arrival..., then I just waited for their arrival, then I grew tired of waiting for their arrival. While growing tired I stumbled upon discussion of something called a "Tablet PC". Instead of waiting for something with a 4" screen, I could actually buy a device almost the size of a notepad that I could write on and have it stored electronically and convert handwriting to text if I wanted to. Who needed to wait for a 4" device?? But then I once again became a local expert, now in Tablet PC's, little knowing that the tricks to optimize handwriting recognition were different, along with all sorts of things. Now, when you are not paid or allotted time to be a technology expert, you don't want to be, you would prefer to have someone else answer your questions. So, as has been true for many years, some of the technology that goes into Tablets have been "trapped" in devices tailor-made for various vertical industries. Manufacturers aim for a business or corporate market where someone will purchase a large quantity at a time, so they design, make, and market them that way. Apple designs the iPad and markets it to the public, and guess what, it sells!!! What a concept!!! Just to show that some old dogs don't learn knew tricks, I learn about the HP 500 Slate from... an ad on TV, radio, print? No, from a comment on a tech blog!!! (Thank you!) What else do I learn about this 7" slate dual-touch device that runs Win7? That first, it almost didn't go to market, second, you have to wait months to get one becauae they dramatically underanticipated the market for it. Of course, it is easy to think the market will be small for it when you don't market it and make it hard to find on your home website. (If you click on the "Laptop and Tablet PC" main heading at HP, good luck locating all 3 of their most recent tablet PC's). Now, having always used MS I don't want to use an Apple device, especially one that will not do the things I do with a Tablet PC. Several devices that use Android sound appealing, but I have no idea how Android functions compared to a windows OS. I have no idea how compatible they are or whether documents need to be converted back and forth, and I really don't want to spend the time trying to find out myself and I have no idea who to ask, no matter how much I would pay them. (Well, I do know a few people on websites like J. Kendrick, but...). I imagine those who are looking at getting a Tablet as an outgrowth of their smartphone experience will be comfortable with some of these other OSs, but someone who wants a fingertip and pen input device as a mobile form of a PC wants a...PC that is moblie with pen and fingertip input, no problem learning a new OS, learning how to convert one thing to another. Give 10 college students a PC OS Tablet- slate with external keyboard or a light convertible with OneNote, make sure they have a clue how to use it, and see how many want to trade it for something else in a month. I dare you hardware makers, I dare you. Thank you for your kind indulgence.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

The issue I have is that other companies build products with a full feature set right up front. Apple likes to release what is worthy of being called a prototype. They then fix it over a year and release a new one with a few more features. Then a year later another upgrade, then another, then....gee how many bloody almost identical iPhones have been released and NOW they finally have one with the feature that others have had for years already. A giant marketing swindle for suckers. I don't like being a guinnea pig for an electronics company that refuses to get it right the first time, when they could do better from square one.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Enamoured than you would be after using an even more limited and incapable device for a year. How exciting will reading the newspaper on a big flat screen be in a year?

DNSB
DNSB

Try holding that weight to read an ebook. After a while, it starts to add up. That's why I use a Kobo (eInk screen) for most entertainment reading and an iPad for the technical books (mostly PDF format) where the larger screen is an advantage for actually being able to read a diagram.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Why do you think MS made the kenect? The Wii controllers were to heavy and geeks were hurting themselves...

coffee-turtle
coffee-turtle

The article was very well written. Apple products are very good, but who doesn't like variety and options? No Apple bashing here. Having alternatives and choices is good. Stick with whatever works for you personally. Some change can be good.

pgit
pgit

"First, I don't know who the companies are making products for and who they are marketing to and why. I think most of the manufacturers don't really know either." The answer is they are leading "consumers" by the nose. See my post "bing-friggin'-go! above for a humorous take...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We need input from those outside IT. It keeps the rest of us grounded.

MacNewton
MacNewton

Apple users have the understanding that it takes time to develop something really good & dependable. Thats why we buy Apple products. Apple may not get it right on the first model, but they stick to it! As a PC WinDos product user like Oz_Media, it must be frustrating to have a new product released then removed form the shelf the very next month. How many times does it take you to understand that Apple has the balls to take a stand and hold their ground.Most PC manufactures just give up the game way to soon. Lets face it, Oz_Media, you just don't get it. "Way too cool" Products are always going to be In Apples domain. Just live with it, and move on.

ShockMe
ShockMe

...with the daily news on the iPad. I think cameras are a bit pointless on a tablet given the camera angles and how it is normally held. But in a stand they could be useful on the desktop for video conference. In the field, our specialists would prefer a wireless link between a dedicated camera and the tablet but something is probably better than nothing in dome cases. HR and our security manager aren't keen on cameras due to potential misuse, but someone holding up a big honking tablet at 7 or 10 inches is pretty unstealthy. I would prefer the next version start at 32GB in order to leave more room for fonts and printer drivers. A USB port and an external slot for full-size SD cards would be nice adds if they can be done securely.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

.. geeks where hurting there TVs.. something had to be done to remove the potential for flinging controllers (by intent or "broken strap"). :D

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Mario beat me up last weekend, man. I could barely move! LOL. Anything under 10 lbs is good enough for me anyway.

seferbo
seferbo

In order to fit into such tight pants and v-necks they must sacrifice muscle mass as well. But then again the weight of the product wont out (err) weigh the fact that hipsters are huge fans of any apple product. Last time I checked they had to have at least a scarf + a macbook pro and/or iphone to hang out at a coffee shop.

mimoore
mimoore

My simple-minded idea. Take your prototypical device, whatever it is*, and hang out where there are college students. (Hire a college student to do it for you, if you have to). Find out what they like/don't like about it and why- keep track of who's at school passing time and wants entertainment and those who are serious about accomplishing 'meaningful" tasks. Work on the prototype, or start with a new "prototype", and repeat the process until you know you have a winner. Then do the "TupperWare"/"Pampered Chef" Direct Marketing- give a few away on different campuses, with good tech support, a few incentives for the recipients to take time showing others, and with time you have a foot in the market. That's how tablets sell anyway without any plan behind it. Unless things are changing, unless a campus is officially going to Tablets the computer stores don't do much (if anything) with them. *My starting point would be a 10-12" "Tablet Slate" with accompanying keyboard. Ever the one to have options, I would like the following functionality: The "Slate" by itself is fully functioning computer, physical form optimized for taking notes. It comes with an "associated" keyboard. For the person gone all day sometimes taking notes and sometimes typing something between classes/meetings, the keyboard must be conveniently attached (like a "convertible" "Tablet"). But, it also must work for the person who is using it as a slate all day and doesn't want the added bulk of the keyboard and then wants to use it in conjunction with the keyboard (and mouse, etc.) "like a laptop". Perhaps this is done by attaching the keyboard, perhaps this is done by attaching it to a docking station and the keyboard/mouse plug in or are wireless. College students are the primary consumer base. They congregate and can spread the info by direct contact. Whether they go into business, medicine, journalism, whatever they know the Tablet form factor. They also have younger brothers and sisters in high school and parents at home. So, while in one way you would like to have them presented to people going into college before they buy their "computer for school", I imagine a fair number of people these days get a new computer at least once during 4 years of college.

MacNewton
MacNewton

Interesting that a lot of people on this blog are from Vancouver or the lower mainland of BC. We certainly have a broad base of retired industry experts living here. Its always good to see different points of view on what is going on in our "Tech" World. Yes, I'm a Mac-hound and love talking about it. Maybe we should all startup our own blog page on TechRepublic just for BC'ers. Then we can be one big happy family. Remembers the Christmas spirit, happy blogging.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I wasn't waiting for a response, there's no need to apologize for not responding to a comment that wasn't directed at you to begin with.

ShockMe
ShockMe

The iPad is very good and will get better. One hopes the Tab will also. The market will determine which features are the most important. I believe enhanced wireless synching and sharing will address most of the iPad's issues for daily use. And when Google moves toward an interface that optimizes itself for different form factors and available sensors and radio sets (which one assumes will trump the universal apps available for iOS). I think tablets will be great fun. Perhaps Microsoft will even make use of their wonderful Metro interface where it should have been born: a Windows tablet. Until that happens I will be quite happy with my personal iPad and enjoy writing apps to make my colleagues work easier. And OZ will still be here in this thread trying to have the last word.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

One of those, "I had that idea long ago though I didn't do anything about it", inventors.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Blackberry obviously stole copy/paste from Apple before Apple included it into the mobile phone. Clearly, this is the only rational explanation. ("them darn indians settling our land before we discovered it!")

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I wastalkign with a friend the other day who couldn't believe i get nearly a week from my smart phone. His iPhone, he has to charge nightly. We compared call logs and I actually used mine more than he did, sent more SMS etc. How these copycats can beat out the pioneer is just plain cool though. :D

Slayer_
Slayer_

It also doubles as my MP3 player, does a decent job of it, i have it hooked up to the car stereo when I am driving. Battery usually goes about 7 days before needing to be recharged (including nights). It also doesn't lose signal if I hold it to tightly. I actually have to press the end call button when I want to end a call.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

From what I understand, Apple pioneers everything and they didn't have copy and paste until it was finally revised. If your blackberry is older, than I doubt it can do that if Apple wasn't offering it at the time also. Or else when Blackberry had it nobody needed it until iPhone had it too, then it becomes a worthy feature. ;)

Slayer_
Slayer_

First time using it, its an old phone too, but it worked properly :).

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

But then you go into the third party, as if you were speaking to the masses from your soapbox instead?!? "it is comfortable to use in as many places as a old newspaper." But costs more than 400X as much. Dataplans are a lot more expensive than internet access and 4G is not faster than wired networks; thus it its more expensive and limited. I take nespapers out with thetrash and just throw them in the blue bin beside the dumpster. YOu can't POSSIBLY making a case for iPad being useful as an electronic newspaper because it save recycling. There's nore pollution made in the manufacturing components and disposal when they release newer iPads down the road. When iPad starts adding all the bells and whistles people actually want, former users will all parade about how they have all these connectivity options, just as they defend why they DON'T have them today. It happened with iPhone when they finally started makign them with a worthy featureset too. First everyone defended the lack of needing copy and paste, now everyone brags that it does that too, though many years after competitive produsct did. Face it, Apple fans will always applaud ANYTHING Apple releases, they will make excuses for drawbacks and then praise the features when added. It's par for the course and you sure as hell aren't fooling me. Seen it all before, right from the first Macbook, then iPod, then iPhone. It's a pretty obvious marketing pattern.

ShockMe
ShockMe

You mentioned reading news in the post I as replying to. Any device connected to the Internet has fees associated with it. All though that is not the only use I make if it, it is, in fact the best news reader I've had to date because it is comfortable to use in as many places as a old newspaper. No need to find secondary uses for it or to bundle it for recycling as often. Unless you are stealing bandwidth free content on the Internet is not free. It should also be clear that any features they add certainly weren't deal breakers for my personal device. What people should take away from this is that most of the tasks that could once only be accomplished on a desktop or notebook can now be done in more places more easily. Aside from keyboard-heavy tasks like responding to Oz!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Your case for liking it, is that you are still enamoured that you can read a newspaper on it? Things you would like added are all pretty much teh standard list of things everyone is saying they lack compared to competitive devices. Storage space, cameras, USB ports and SD cards. In essence, the only benefit anyone will take away from that is that it is cool reading your newspaper on an electronic device...for $399.99 + a full data plan and subscriptions to newspaper services (e-book readers have been out for ages though). I'll stick to the free online newspaper or just throw $1 in the paper box if I need to line the bird cage or make a pirate hat.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

They became popular in the 80's (as noted the Don Johnson look), they are just variable razors so you can adjust them to leave a spec length. If you hung out at Starbucks with your iPad and $200 "professionally worn and ripped" jeans, more often you'd know these things....er, I had to Google it but I knew they existed from mags I've read. :) http://www.usa.philips.com/c/-/t980_60/prd/norelco/

DNSB
DNSB

The one popularized by Don Johnson during the run of Miami Vice? The perpertual 2 day shadow?

Slayer_
Slayer_

This is news to me, maybe thats how Jason Statham manages to maintain the exact amount of stubble no matter how much movie-time passes.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Not allowed to shave unless with a stubble razor that leaves a perfectly trimmed, but untrimmed looking stubble. ah, people watching is so much fun sometimes.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Full on computers for user with needs beyond fingerpainting on the screen. Full stylus touch support is there, along with cursive writing recognition. You just jot notes on the screen and it converts them to text for you, why do you need to paw a screen? Far more useful as a business device than a glorified eBook reader. It's pathetic that you aare so unaware of the resources required to operate a business are better met by a proprietary online store. are yuo that hideously incapable that you can't source out your own software? The iStpre barely offers anything I need or use, just little mobile apps. No, I have no need for an iPad, iPhone, iPod and be restricted and locked down by the device. But thanks for your concern and questions all the same.

DNSB
DNSB

Try reading your own words. To quote: "Just like notebooks, when netbooks first came out nobody would touch them until they offered the same connections and expandability that Notebooks did" Please note that the average notebook offers an optical drive. Yet the lack does not seem to have stopped people from purchasing netbooks. The real question to ask if it does what I need instead of waiting for a device that might do more in the future or spending 10 times the money for features that I don't need. For instance, does the ruggedized $5K tablet you are so enthused about offer a multitouch/gesture interface similar to those of iOS and Android devices? Does it offer an app store with a wide selection of apps and games? Or do I have to waste my time searching for applications that very often make little if anny use of it's touch interface? Does it offer a 10 hour battery life? Considering the total sales of slate/tablet computers prior to Apple entering the market, your "superior" devices seem to have done little to recommend their purchase to the would be purchaser.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

The 2740P is an nice tablet. Again, business class features but not cheap, at $2700 they offer so much more, which can be justified simply for the feeture set that really helps you get business done on one, very portable device; almost qualifies as semi-rugged too.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I didn't mention optical drives or who dropped what first!? You haven't a clue what you are on about. I never said anything about buying devices for needs 5 years down the road either, where do you even dream up such BS? If you are going to insist on tailing me like that, you should at least buy me dinner or get me drunk first. As you said yourself, your needs are YOUR needs, not mine. Now stop being so needy and begging for my attention too.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Following me around like a lost puppy and posting after every comment I make, whether directed at you or not, would be flattering if it wasn't so creepy; I hope you'll at least wear a condom. I wasn't talking about buying a notebook that will be current in 10 years. I am talking about a business investment. I'd rather pay $5K for something that does the full job today than wait 10 years for it in order to sase money. I don't care what price tag Apple sticks on a product, if it doesn't do anything that's already done, it bloody well better be a tenth of the cost. My focus is that Apple isn't offering anythign that hasn't been done already. It has a limited feature set that renders it useless except for a handful of simple tasks for cheap gadget junkies and Apple fanbois. 'It's cheap', is hardly a selling point. You can buy a toilet roll for even less but it won't do f-all but let you wipe your arse. When enterprises around teh world won't even consider iPad in a bid and specifically request several others, including $5K Itronix tablet instead, it illustrates the real business limitations of a $400 iPad in a market Apple is CLAIMING to have pioneered, 10 years after others have lead the way. Once again, Apple is just lookign to enter a market that is already dominated by far superior products, they are simply offering a cheapo STAND-IN for a market they canot compete in.

DNSB
DNSB

Hmmm... got a netbook with a builtin optical drive? Yeah, right. Apple was among the first companies to drop floppy drives. So many notebooks and netbooks these days still have them. Apple was the first to drop optical drives. Hmmm... bit of quick research indicates that Apple wasn't even the fifth company to offer a notebook without an optical drive. "I don't need that" is often rather true. Check J.K. Jerome's "Three Men in a Boat" for advice that might be over a century old but still very relevant. What I look for is a device that does what I need for the next 1 to 2 years. I don't spend the time thinking what I might want to use it for 5 years from now. Been in electronics and IT long enough to know that the lifespan of purchase isn't that long. For me, the availability of the Camera Connection Kit was the deal maker in picking up an iPad. Gave me the USB port and the SD card reader that I needed. Your choices might be different but don't make the error of believing that your choices are the only right choices. That way lies fanaticism.

DNSB
DNSB

What a choice. I buy a ruggedized tablet (which I really don't don't need) for $5K or I buy a new tablet each year for 10 years for $500 per year. At the end of that time, I have an up to date unit compared to a 10 year old clunker. Been there, done that. I still have an old Thinkpad X20. Close to the screen size of an iPad at 12.1" but display quality is not near the same. No builtin optical drive, no builtin wireless, maximum RAM is 320MB, hard drive is 20GB and CPU is a PIII 600MHz. Came with Windows 98SE, with maxed out RAM, Windows XP barely runs. Solidly built but now makes a great paper weight (3.5 lbs of weight). I even have the 640x480 UltraPort camera that clips to the special connector on top of the display. Got some good use out of that 2662-34U but it's day is done.

mimoore
mimoore

Well, the other response would be for a consumer to start the company that provides what he or she really wants. As in my first post, it seems to me that HP has no clue what they are doing. They have a product to compete with the iPad offering things the iPad doesn't, they barely market it, the demand outstrips the supply, and how does any of this make sense? The next thing HP will do is cancel the model, if they keep to standard protocol. Meanwhile, every body else is scurrying to get something on the market that HP could have had going full force maybe 6 months ago.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Just like notebooks, when netbooks first came out nobody would touch them until they offered the same connections and expandability that Notebooks did. Actually, the same happened with notebooks too, people didn't want to give up their desktops or else they needed docking stations, which most do not today. However, enter apple and people will drink the KoolAid, think it's new and cutting edge and then even make excuses for its drawbacks. "I don't need that", comes from teh same people who complained "I need that" when refusing to buy a notebook. It's easy to sell products in the US, there's always someone that will be baffled by BS and then repeat it to everyone he knows until they follow like true sheeple too.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Well you are stuck in today's world then. 79-80 years ago technology was steel and mechanical. IT lasted forever but was expensive to manufacture. The IC chip changed it all, smaller, less expensive electrinics plastered everywhere, carrying former high end brand names where many slipped into cheapo town to compete and move more product. Remember when tube amps all but disappeared to make way for the cheapo electronics we find at Future Shop and Best Buy today? Some of the high end tube amps are still in production but he cost has risen through the roof, well beyond consumer friendly. You can still pay apremium price for a tablet that does everyrthing too, but who is willing to pay $5K for full features when they can buy a new ipad every other year instead? It's there if you want it, you just have to ignore trends and hype and start looking at the high end of the market again. I too have an old Thinkpad and it walks all over newer notbooks without contest. Again, that is unless you are willing to fork out teh dough for high end. You won't find quality on big box retail shelves, just as my Thinkpad wasn't available on retail shelves either.

ShockMe
ShockMe

...not to buy products that lack the features he or she requires. Simple. Happens everyday. Sometimes consumers are wrong, but eventually both parties learn or the company goes out of business. That's why I purchase things for what they can do when they can do it to my satisfaction.

mimoore
mimoore

So... they question is, since THEY will not do it the way they COULD do it, can WE? The common complaint is, "They don't make them like they used to". To the degree that is true, I guess 70-80 years ago or so enough of the public did not have any "modern appliances" that manufacturers built with quality, knowing there would be an adequate number of people to buy their product even if it lasted 20 years and knowing that people expected something to last a long time. Money didn't come easy, credit wasn't easy. At some point, apparently, companies decided people would want (or be willing anyway) to buy the "new improved" version every 10 years, or 5 years, or 2 years, or even less, depending on how fast the technology changed and how well the manufacturers could get people to buy initial sub-par offerings as you describe. Is it technically possible and economically feasible to make computers that you should expect to be usable for a student for 4 years (or more if you count handing it down to kid brother/sister)? I have an IBM laptop at least 6 years old that is limited (for what I want to use it for) simply by its RAM capacity. I think Gateway tried a program where you could pay so much at a regular interval and get "constantly" upgraded equipment, I don't know if that program itself went bust or if it met its demise as Gateway was eclipsed by Dell. Not an engineer, not a businessman, not a venture capitalist, just a user who can't get any satisfaction looking for what I want and is tired at people telling me what I need.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

But marketing is not so upstanding these days. Developing a product starts with a price point. We must make a device that we can sell to college students and IT gadget junkies for X dollars with a profit margin of X points. Then they write a list of suspected features, scour the Orient for the lowest possible component costs, lowest possible manufacturing costs, lowest possible packaging costs. They then design a gadget that fits budget. They remove features and add features until the hit a balance slightly higher in cost than planned. Then they go back to said, cheap component manufacturers, cardboard cutters etc. and tell them to lower their price to X. They build a prototype, and run focus groups to figure out where they miss the mark and what BUZZ WORDS the focus group uses (this allows them to address the lack of said features in the final product). They then focus on removing and adding features again until a balance is met between the 'absolute must' group and the 'should have' or 'would like' groups. That done they build a cheap device with the absolute minimum capabilities to keep people somewhat interested and spend several million developing a market campaign that focuses on the must haves and excuses the lack of should haves or would likes. It is EASY to turn an objection into a selling point, that's what marketing is focused on, not simply putting forth a list of can do's and benefits. Instead of selling a complete device at a high price point, it's easy to say, We left this out purposely because of.... or We didn't include this because of.... BUT you can still......and Who even wants to....... It's so easy to sell a 'lack' as a benefit and still retain your price point. Then as popularity, technology and manufacturing costs drop, price point only remains strong by introducing a device that includes what was initially skipped and excused. Version 2 now includes all the stuff you initially wanted but we told you that you didn't want. We said you didn't want it because of....... Other manufacturers did it but they are no good because..... Now technology has changed and we've managed to keep end user costs down through endless hours of painstaking work to help YOU, the consumer, so now we are offering.......which is better than anyone else can offer. "Duh, can I use my credit card to buy another one online now or shall I wait overnight at your boutique outlet to buy it"