Windows

10 reasons Vista haters will love Windows 7

Disgruntled Vista users, take heart: According to Deb Shinder, Windows 7 addresses many Vista annoyances and offers myriad improvements of its own.

Disgruntled Vista users, take heart: According to Deb Shinder, Windows 7 addresses many Vista annoyances and offers myriad improvements of its own.


Many of my friends and readers adamantly refused to make the switch to Windows Vista when it came out. Some who bought new machines with Vista installed immediately "downgraded" the OS. A few proclaimed that they would give up XP only when you pried it from their cold, dead hands. But even in the last category, many of them are impressed with what they've seen in the Windows 7 beta.

While some tech pundits are saying 7 isn't really all that different from Vista -- and indeed, one of the attractions for Vista users is that 7 can generally use the same drivers and run the same apps as Vista -- the consensus among anti-Vista folks I know who've tried the 7 beta seems to be that the new operating system is "Vista done right."

Here's why I think you'll see many of the XP diehards happily embracing Windows 7 when it's released.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: UAC has mellowed out

User Account Control in Vista is like living with an overprotective mother -- when you're 30. It's constantly popping up to warn you of impending danger, even when you're just trying to take a look at Device Manager or perform some other innocent task. It hovers over you and nags you constantly: "Are you sure you want to do that?" Like Mom, UAC has our best interests in mind, but it can drive you nuts in the name of "security" -- especially when you consider that it doesn't really define a security boundary. (For more on that, see Mark Russinovich's TechNet Magazine article "Inside Windows Vista User Account Control."

Windows 7 doesn't do away with UAC, but it does give users options regarding its behavior. By reducing the number of unnecessary and redundant UAC dialogs, making the prompts more informative, and providing users with more control over UAC, Windows 7 maintains many of the benefits of the feature without intruding on users' computing lives so much that they turn the whole thing off in frustration.

2: Explorer is no longer a pane in the behind

In a misguided attempt to alleviate the need for horizontal scrolling, Vista made the left navigation pane in Windows Explorer a constantly moving target. As you move your mouse, it will automatically scroll back and forth. My husband calls this auto-scrolling feature the "whack a mole" phenomenon because of the way the contents of the pane seem to dodge back and forth.

You can avoid the auto-scrolling by dragging the pane to make it wide enough to accommodate the entire tree, but that isn't a good option on a small screen, such as the one on my compact VAIO notebook.

In Windows 7, the navigation pane stays still, so you no longer risk getting seasick from all the swaying back and forth.

3: Graphics cards coexist peacefully once more

In XP, we could use pretty much whatever graphics cards we wanted for multiple monitors. I had a machine with three cards installed: an NVidia, an ATI, and a Matrox. XP would stretch my desktop across all three monitors attached to those cards. When I upgraded that machine to Vista, I found that I no longer had multiple monitors. Some research revealed that to use multiple graphics cards, they would have to all use the same driver. That meant I couldn't use cards from different vendors together. I had to shell out a few bucks to get more ATI cards before I could use all my monitors again.

According to reports, Windows 7 has added support for multiple heterogeneous graphics cards from different vendors. Now this probably doesn't mean you can combine ATI and NVIDIA cards in an SLI-configuration, but it sounds as if we can have our multi-vendor multi-monitor setups back.

4: Clutter and bloat are reduced

Vista was perhaps the culmination of Microsoft's efforts to be all things to all users. Along with the built-in applications we got with XP, Vista added a contacts program, a calendaring program, a photo editing program, and so forth. While some users appreciate all these free applications, many others have been annoyed by the "extras" they don't need or use. If you're planning to install Office with Outlook, there's no need for Contacts and Calendar. And if you have your own favorite and more powerful graphics applications, such as PhotoShop, there's no need for Photo Gallery. The extras just clutter up your Programs menu and take up space on the hard disk.

With Windows 7, Microsoft has removed a number of the extra programs and now offers them as free downloads from the Windows Live Web site. This way, those who want them can have them, and those who don't won't have to deal with removing them.

5: Boot performance is better

Another common complaint about Vista has been the inordinate amount of time it can take to boot up. This might not be an issue for those who leave their systems on all the time, but if you turn off your computer every night, waiting around forever for it to get started in the morning can turn into a major annoyance.

A Microsoft spokesperson indicated that the company's goal for Windows 7 is a 15-second boot time, whereas three quarters of Vista users report boot times of more than 30 seconds. Although the beta of Win7 may not have achieved that 15-second mark yet for most users, the majority of beta testers I'm hearing from say it's substantially quicker than Vista on the same hardware. That's been my personal experience, as well. Since it is still a beta, it's not unrealistic to hope that continued tweaking will get that time down further before the final release.

6: Notifications can be fine-tuned

In XP and Vista, you can disable the balloon notifications in the system tray, but what if you'd like to continue to get notifications from some applications but not from others? Windows 7 allows you to customize the behavior by simply clicking the little arrow next to the tray and selecting Customize. In the dialog box, choose which icons you want to appear in the tray. For each application, you can select whether you want to display notifications or hide them, as shown in Figure A.

Figure A

Windows 7 gives you much more control over those notifications in the system tray.

7: Security messages are consolidated

In Vista, you have several security-related icons in the system tray, and you might have notifications popping up from each one. To make changes to security settings, you may have to open several applications. In Windows 7, all the security messages have been consolidated into one icon. When you click it, you'll see all messages related to firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update settings, and so forth, as shown in Figure B.

Figure B

Windows 7 consolidates all security-related messages in one system tray icon.
By clicking the Open Action Center link in the message box, you can make the changes that are recommended or (for example, in the case where you have an antivirus program installed but Windows doesn't recognize it), you can select the option to turn off messages regarding that application, as shown in Figure C.

Figure C

You can make changes or turn off particular security notifications in the Action Center.

8: Side-by-side windows auto-size

Most of the monitors sold today come in a wide aspect ratio that's better for watching movies, which is also handy for displaying two documents side by side on the screen. With Vista, though, you have to manually size those docs. Windows 7 has a cool new feature by which you can drag windows to each side of the screen and they will automatically size themselves to each take up half the screen when you let go of the cursor.

Even better, if you drag the window back away from the edge, it goes back to the size it was before. How cool is that?

9: Home networking gets simple

For home users without a lot technical know-how, networking has been made simpler in Windows 7. A new feature called HomeGroup allows all Windows 7 computers on a network to share files, printers, and other resources more easily. Thanks to Libraries (collections of certain types of files, such as music, photos, or documents), you can access files anywhere on the HomeGroup network as if they were stored locally, and you can search across the whole HomeGroup.

Windows Media Player in Windows 7 can stream the music and videos on one PC in the network to another, and even play back songs from iTunes libraries on other computers.

Connecting to a wireless network is also easier; now you can click the wi-fi icon in the system tray and select a network from the list, instead of opening up a separate dialog box to make the connection.

10: Taskbar preview really works

In Vista, you can hover over a taskbar button -- for Internet Explorer, for example -- and see that three instances of IE are open. You see the open pages stacked as shown in Figure D, but they're so small that it's difficult to really tell which page is which.

Figure D

The Vista taskbar preview gives you an idea of what your running application windows contain.
In Windows 7, the preview feature has been enhanced so that it becomes an extremely useful function. Now when you hover over a taskbar icon, you get actual previews that are placed side by side and are large enough for you to identify (Figure E).

Figure E

In Windows 7, you can actually tell what's in each of those preview windows.
And that's not all. If you're playing a video in one of the windows, that video plays in the preview window, too. And if you right-click the IE icon in the taskbar, you get a list of your IE history files, as shown in Figure F. You can just click any of those and go immediately to that page.

Figure F

Right-clicking the taskbar icon gives you more options; in the case of IE, you can select from the history files, open a new instance of the browser, unpin the program, or close the window.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

169 comments
Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Vista haters were ,mainly peopel who couldn' affor dot upgrade from XP, had just upgraded to XP or jumped on the Vista hate bandwagon and said, I'll wait for Win7 (just to be cool of ocurse). Meanwhile Vista was more secure and just as fast as XP, as independant tests here have proven, and yet was still parroted to be garbage by the followers of the countless people who'd never used Vista to begin with and yet said it was junk. The stories were identical in every complaint to what we heard here when XP was released. So, now it's Win7 time. People who hated Vista now HAVE to say Win7 is better, as they were so smart and ahead of the game that they couldn't possibly be wrong after all that bitching and arguing. Having used Win7 I do like it, but Vista is pretty slick now anyway, always has worked like a well oiled machine for me anyway (and I run more apps than most users as my needs span several fields). So, some will jump on the Win7 bandwagon and continue to say Vista is junk, just because it didn't run well with half the required ram on a box designed for XP (just as XP failed on most Win2K boxes). The rest will eihter stick to Vista, upgrade for free to Win7 or sim[ply download it for free and hope it runs on their older box. Win7 is different than Vista, just as Vista was different from XP, which as different from WinME, which was different from Win2K, which was different from Win98SE, which was different from Win85...see a pattern yet? And every time something is DIFFERENT, a certain group of very loud people scream, bitch and whine that it is garage when in actuality they just fear change period.

stefan.smit
stefan.smit

Most importantly, the system performance will be better.

mammon88
mammon88

i love windows 7 it is what people say vista done right so far i have no issues in running it i will be switching to windows 7 from vista

crazartist
crazartist

Why Do I Always Get a message of can't preview this folder, need administrator permission, etc when i try to open a folder in another computer in my homegroup!

amit07
amit07

I compained my friend working in MS developing Windows 7. I told him my endless grieviences about Vista! In response he told me that Windows 7 is an Answer to Vista. He clearly indicated that MS has realized the terrible mistakes they have committed in Vista. He also claims that reports states that after Win 95 this is the best version.Lets hope for the best@!

desirawson
desirawson

This is the worst news I have heard yet (next to all the whiners about Vista and how horrible it is). Auto-Scrolling in Explorer instead of having to "make the pane wider" was one of the VERY MANY NEW features Vista encompasses that was PURE JOY to work with. You point your mouse at the drive and it moved over for you - no work involved on your part. I've said it a 1,000 times - besides the size of Vista, there are so many wonderful functions in Vista OS, and people are either afraid of change, don't take the time to learn them, or are just plain stuck in a rut! I LOVE Vista, and if people would actually use some of the functions that it contains, I am positive it would have been a success. Now we are going backwards to Windows 7, which is made to look like XP to satisfy all these people who cannot handle change - but encompass most of Vista's wonderful attributes.

SizzlingSkizzors
SizzlingSkizzors

I'm not an OS developer, but come on, does it really take 2 1/2 years of microsoft's windows team (which presumably is quite large as windows is ms's major product), to come up with these 10 things? Really? There don't seem to be any real improvements, at least no mind breaking innovations. Come on.

jwebfoot2togo
jwebfoot2togo

I used Vista for years with no complaints. But Win7 reminds me of that joke called ME. No classic view option. Continually losing drivers. Hell you can't even set a local printer as default, provided OS even recognizes it. Unless the retail version is a lot better than my Beta I'll never buy it and won't recommend it to anyone else. In fact I would go back to XP before using Win7.Oh and for the HomeGroup a total joke can't even see other PCs let alone their shared folders, doesn't even see the server. So install at your own risk.

bands55
bands55

It took long enough, but it looks like Microsoft may have hit one out of the park wirh Windows

david
david

Did they make any enhancements to the blue screen of death application they seem to be so proud of?

9721717617
9721717617

it's just incredible look @ fantastic

Kc in VA
Kc in VA

I use both Windows and SUSE Linux at home, and many of these features have been available in Linux for years! That said, I also use Windows for some applications which simply require it. All I ask for from my OS (and those developing new versions of them) is three things... (a) Reliability - don't keep crashing, and run what I want, when I want (b) Usability - the UI should be intuitive and not get in my way... ideally making me MORE productive (c) Flexibility - let me do what I want, when I want, and don't force me to do anything (including reboot!) With each evolution that Vista and now 7 represent... MS seems to be getting further and further away from these. In other words, IMHO they are not bringing more value on their platform to me. So for the forseeable future, XP will stay.

departed666
departed666

What about the classic start menu? How damn clunky is the new start menu that is shipped with XP and onwards? You can't use keyboard shortcuts to navigate; it just defaults into the search bar, which is useless as I don't need to search. It forces you to use the mouse, things are all arranged strangely, etc. I doubt more than 20% of the Windows 95/98 users adopted XP's new menu and wish the classic one would come back with Windows 7. (It was in Vista, WHY did they remove it?!) Then quick launch, where is it? Even the people who use the new start menu surely use quick launch. This feature is irreplaceable. (I tried to create a makeshift quicklaunch and it failed miserably.) 'Upgrading' your operating system (or any software for that matter) should not reduce your efficiency at using it, it should improve it. Microsoft has taken 2 steps backwards with Vista, and now with Windows 7. These are some of the few (and major) reasons I will not embrace Windows 7 (at least, until someone mods in classic support seeing as it WAS in Windows 7 before it switched over to the new SuperFail). And to be honest.. testing Windows 7 made me install Vista again. I never thought that would happen. (When I re-installed it after nearly 2 years of a break, I wondered how I could've ever used it for 6 months, so sad.) As much as I'm dying to use Windows 7, I just can't.

siliconsanu
siliconsanu

I just have one query . It has been a big question for so many unsatisfied vista users even me ,if there will get a free upgrade of windows 7 from microsoft for people who already spent big money for vista? Is mocrosoft going to take care of their customers for its already existing vista issues by replacing with windows 7?

morwen
morwen

I think that my first vista experience tells the hate tail- first built the machine to publisised specs ran the are you ready for VIsta software then bought the Ultimate package was price raped, then tried to install it for seventeen hours all to find out that it craps in it's own nest every time you try to install anything! Windows seve beta 7000 build loaded clean ran everything but crossfire out of the gate and worked as you expect it to. Vista? oh, Kiss my canary!!!!!

ace19
ace19

I'm a diehard XP fan which unfortunately is vista on his new notebook (which suck big time because my windows media player deiced to not work)is really looking forward to windows 7 "vista fix" because vista is the worst OS Microsoft ever made (in terms of user friendly and functionality)in the history of Microsoft (worst than Windows Me)....... The reason why i said that is many people are not switching to vista and downgrading to a non-vista product than any other OS that Microsoft made.

butts
butts

Winblows will always suck, no matter how much Apple-brand lucite they pump into its sagging breasts.

rpmcestmoi
rpmcestmoi

30 reasons why XP Professional is still the best OS of their last several. The reinvention of the wheel at MS is nuts

hasan.asad
hasan.asad

I have loved Windows 7 and can't wait for the final version. I am using beta 1 and it is wonderful and very fast interface.

marcus_weber2
marcus_weber2

Eh, it will probably fail just like XP and Vista.... Its a terrible OS, switched to Mac - I love it, best decision I have made....think I'll stay there... Sorry, you failed! Once you can make something that doesn't have to be rebooted every hour and will actually respond, you might have something!

zeta2alien
zeta2alien

instead of fixing vista they made a new one to sell? hmm it smell like a scam ...anyways to show my hate towards the multimillionare bill gates im telling everyone how to fix their computers by reinstalling vista allready in their harddrive by pressing ctrl alt F10 when you restart windows select factory install it also works with the acer one netbook and its XP and on computers is called recovery ..but im saying if it doesnt start at all or you have a virus like aboutblank ..you press the keys

tds
tds

I think that all the "vista haters" hate vista because of all the pop-ups so with the new vista 7 and with action center!!!!cant wait for the realese

rpgsuperfan
rpgsuperfan

1: Don't even need it. Nothing bad has happened since turning it off. 2: I'm sure there's a way to turn this off, but if you had a comp that ran at any decent resolution it wouldn't be an issue. What's this guy's VAIO running? 800x600? 3: Why the hell would you be putting more than one brand of gfx cards in the same machine? I guess to compare them for performance tests or whatever? But it's not like you can't put one in, record the results, then switch. This is kind of a silly complaint. The average user doesn't use multiple displays anyway. 4: NOBODY IS FORCING YOU TO USE THOSE. 5: Okay, this is kind of nice, but people are too goddamn impatient if they can't wait 15 seconds. Is it really going to kill you to put "turn on the computer" one step further up your list in the morning to be sure it's on when you're ready for it? Remember when it took 2 or 3 minutes for a computer to start? 6: They can already be tuned per-program... There's an icon for each program, and they each have their own settings. What is the point of having windows oversee this? This is one of those "extras" they mention. 7: I don't even get security messages. And if you want to keep up to date with that stuff, you SHOULD be addressing these as soon as they pop up and not letting them pile up like that. And you can already turn off those messages in Vista. 8: Okay that's kind of cool, but I bet I could easily find a program that does this. 9: Vista already does all of this pretty easily, but I guess the average user is even stupider than I thought. 10: Oh wow, so now you can see the previews of all 10 myspace pages you have open at once! BIG WHOOP. The new folder navigation system, per-app volume control, and DirectX10 were all WAY bigger upgrades than any of this.

rob.plahn
rob.plahn

Loving Windows 7. Fast, solid, very practical improvements. I'm one to turn off all the fancy visualizations but with Windows 7, I'm actually becoming quite fond and unfrotunately dependent on them. Task bar preview is fantastic.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

That is exactly what many where saying about Vista prior to it's release. Of course they didn't have to really work with the then Beta Version of Windows they just played with it. :D But then again the same thing was said about 98, NT3, NT3.5. NT4, 2000 and finally XP. Then after they really started using it they started complaining about just what was missed in development. OH I should have added ME in above but I'm not nasty :^0 Col :-q

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

to say? "It's a POS" Did he say Vista was an answer to XP by the way? Do you want to buy a bridge? It's the bestest bridge ever much better than the last one you bought...

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

will be playing for the next few years. Followed by Goodnight Irene.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

The Problems that many have with Vista is exactly the same that was complained about with XP. There is just too much Hardware & Software that doesn't work on it. If you are buying new Hardware or are a First Time Computer owner then Vista has no real problems as you would only buy hardware/software that works on Vista, but if you are just wanting to replace an existing system then Vista is a very big problem. Not because of the way it looks or works but the fact that you have to buy so much new stuff to use it as you used your previous computer. I have one client who bought a Network printer that didn't have any Vista Drivers 2 months before the release of Vista and when they bought a new NB to try out with Vista on it they where advised by M$ to replace their Network Printer. Well lets consider a $45,000.00 Photocopier that is used as a Network Printer as well or a $1,500.00 NB with Vista that could be reloaded with XP what do you think was their best way to go ahead? :D When you have Mission Critical Applications that do not run on Vista that is the Killer for Vista as it makes it useless to those who would/could otherwise use it. I've supplied numerous computers with Vista without a issue and I've also replaced Vista on Numerous other Computers because it is just not suitable for the application that it is required for. There is no point in claiming how good Vista is if you have to spend thousands more than the cost of a computer to use it. But Funnily enough that was the exact same problem with XP when it was first released and it wasn't thought of as any good till it was 2 or more years old and by which time all new Hardware and Software was made for it. But even then some Business didn't adopt it and I still have some clients using 2000 because the move to XP is either too expensive or just not possible. With the advent of 7 this is not helping Vista in any way, instead of being a development of Vista it looks far more like a complete redesign. Col

Slayer_
Slayer_

It took me 2 weeks to write a first draft of mortgage renewals. Roughly 400 lines of code and a form. The actual code, I wrote in 1.5 days, and the form... well it took 2 weeks before I could even get a proper start on it, and just today I hate another snag, so now I must wait for the "experts" to get back to me with a solution, or to approve my solution. The research, the meetings, the bureaucracy of it all, makes it take a long time. Not to mention I still have to support the old version, that I inherited and is, frankly a mess. It is amazing it works as it is a work of patch jobs. You need to be a developer to truly understand how long systems development can take. It is not as simple as saying Sub Main{ "Please work" }

jon_saxon
jon_saxon

Microsoft definitely wants to take us somewhere whether we want to go or not. For too long it seems their driving motivation is "change for the sake of change." Office 2007 drove me to distraction. And the supposed enhanced security of UAC was nonsense. UAC was nothing more than a "nanny-state" feature and worse than useless. Most people had no idea if they really wanted to allow any given operation to proceed. Vista caused so many problems even on systems "designed for Vista" that I pleaded with people not to buy it. And most of those who did buy it disliked it for many reasons and then pleaded with me to downgrade them. If Microsoft is going to insist that we deploy server-grade equipment to read email and draft simple documents then each succeeding version of their OS is going to be increasingly difficult to sell. If Microsoft is going to insist that we relearn everything with every release more and more people will simply venture off to Linux and Apple. It is increasingly difficult to ignore Linux with OpenOffice and FireFox.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

this really is just a service pack to Vista, not a new OS. Nothing that I have seen (so far) seems to catch me and make me think -- WOW -- I gotta get/use this. Well, time to play on Ubuntu again

Slayer_
Slayer_

Its a vulnerability that ONLY exists if you are in front of the computer??? Excuse me while I stick in a Nix live CD and go access someone elses files effortlessly no matter what passwords they have. I mean seriously! And shall we ignore the fact of how easy it is using safemode, to bypass the windows password all together and get full administrative account access? This is a pretty stupid vulnerability to base a Microsoft product as crap. Especially considering you can pretty much hack any system if you have physical access to it!

jon_saxon
jon_saxon

It is almost as if Microsoft never read "The Mythical Man-Month" and Windows is the eternal "second system" and Microsoft is stuck in a "Ground Hog Day" scenario like Bill Murray except they never seem to learn anything. The fact that you CAN change anything and everything does not mean you MUST change anything and everything. "As he designs his first work, frill after frill, embellishment after embellishment occur to him. These get stored away to be used "next time." Sooner or later the first system is finished, with firm confidence and a demonstrated mastery of that class of systems, is ready to build a second system. This second is the most dangerous system a man ever designs." -- Frederic P. Brooks, The Mythical Man-Month

rpmcestmoi
rpmcestmoi

The constant reinvention of the spokeless wheel called Windows Vista or 7, is senseless. Refine XP and you have a decent product. Just decent, since the Mac OS is beyond decent and Linux will do the work with a less bloated program.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Cause I guess you never need to play games... If you don't have this requirement, why switch to the expensive Mac's, just install a Nix overtop of your old Windows box and you now got a free alternative with all the same strengths and failings as a Mac, without the huge pricetag.

OH Smeg
OH Smeg

What I don't like about Vista and 7 is that so much Mission Critical Software just doesn't work on it and then there is the fact that so much of the existing Hardware that is present isn't supported by Vista. In business you have to use the Computers to make money for the business they are a tool not a means to an end or a religion they are suppose to be usable and easy to use. When you start adding new computers with Vista to a network and find out that they do not support 6 month old Network Printers that set the company back 45K it's not hard to believe what gets tossed a 2K computer or a 45K printer you don't have to be Einstein to work that one out. :^0 Col

lfreel
lfreel

Exactly HAL9000. I've been saying this for a long time. Two of my printers and a film scanner have no drivers for Vista and I expect Windoz 7 won't either. Could it be collusion between the peripheral equipment mfrs and M$? It sure looks like a red flag to me. Where is Congress when we need them.

vucliriel
vucliriel

... It pretty much sums up my own experience :) Investigating and Solution Finding: 1 hour Materials and Labour: $1,000 Job execution: one day lawyering, paper shuffling, record keeping, bean counting: $10,000 Delay expected: 3 years LOL...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Yes I know in Vista you are only supposed to see a BSOD if some thing really nasty has happened and it is More Fatal that a Fatal Error whatever that is of course as I'm not really sure how something can be more Fatal than Fatal. :D But supposedly you are now supposed to see a Red Screen of Death which I have yet to see and the Blue Screen is only supposed to arise when something more Fatal that what has triggered the Red Screen happens. So far I've only seen the [b]More Fatal than Fatal[/b] Problems. :0 Col

jon_saxon
jon_saxon

I am not looking for any "WOW" in Windows 7. It would have been nice to see some of the promised Longhorn features finally emerge in this version but I haven't heard a word about WinFS and "security" remains a joke with dozens of new patches released every "Patch Tuesday." I am not looking for a "new paradigm" as much as stability, compatibility and good performance at a reasonable price. If Microsoft fails again to deliver on those fronts I will be looking at Linux for my next several computers.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I didn't say that M$ was crap just that their Super Secure OS has a Issue reported before it is even released that is unfixable. I'm not the one blowing M$ Story Line here and what I did find interesting was how much of the press was raving about Vista before it's release and then when the real problems became known they turned on it like the pack of Rabid Dogs that they are and tore it to pieces. I don't remember seeing one report in the media about Vista being a Hardware Hog and slow compared to XP. Well maybe there where some but even when this was mentioned prior to it's release it wasn't a [b]Big Deal[/b] but a few months latter it was a killer in the same publications. :p What you are missing here is that you only need physical access once and then you can install whatever you like which affects the computer forever more. So that cleaner who you employ at night can walk up to the CEO's workstation and hijack it to do as they please without any real computer experience because latter on the Script Kiddies will take advantage of this to do their worst. I was actually laughing at the Spiel pushed by M$ on 7 but then again I remember the same thing happening on Vista where they had Patches for Serious Problems available for the Vista OS at it's official Release and a Patch for 2003 to address a Serious Venerability at it's Public Release. Do you see a pattern forming here? :^0 Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

A M$ Web Conference on Windows 7 for OEM Suppliers. Does that help? I've just found out though that the OPK Installer will not be available when 7 Hits the Shelves for us to sell. Now I wonder just how many OEM's will want to be the first to start using it. ;) Col

rpmcestmoi
rpmcestmoi

Nothing venerable about the OS, but plenty of vulnerability. The described problem is not the problem, on premises sabotage, the problem is the OS.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Can get into these systems and install what they please while they are securely in the business premises is the problem. Doesn't matter what security is in place the fact that any worker can gain access to one of these systems with no special knowledge is the worry. The fact that it can not be fixed doesn't help matters any either but it just shouldn't be possible to do this today. Granted it's a pretty weak Venerability but the fact that it is there at all makes one wonder what else is also possible. ;) One has to remember that this is a [b]Yet to Be Released Product[/b] OH BTW MS is a Disease which at this point in time has no known cure so inferring that Microsoft is MS is calling them something far worse that anything I have ever called them :D Col

Slayer_
Slayer_

They are just idiots that way... But still a vunlerability that requires you sitting infront of the machine, with hacking knowledge yet, is pretty insignificant. Why not just walk around with a boot CD and do it all. Heck, walk around with Knoppix LiveCD in your pocket and you can pretty much do whatever you want on any machine. Ah hell, open the computer and steal the HDD, its all yours now :). There is actually a lot of easier ways to steal data, then the vulnerability they found.

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