Windows

10 reasons why Windows XP will be around a while

Windows XP continues to demonstrate formidable staying power. Here are some reasons why many organizations want to hang onto it.

Windows XP continues to demonstrate formidable staying power. Here are some reasons why many organizations want to hang onto it.


A few months ago, TechRepublic ran a poll asking members whether their organization was still using Windows XP as its primary OS.  Nearly 13,000 people responded - and of those, a whopping 96 percent said yes. It appears that despite the favorable press surrounding the impending arrival of Windows 7, IT pros and the companies they work for are not planning to migrate from XP any time soon. Here are a few reasons why.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Many organizations don't see the need to upgrade

For many organizations, sticking with Windows XP makes sense from a business standpoint. After all, Windows XP has already been bought and paid for, and the help desk staff has already been trained in how to support it. If there are no business reasons driving an organization to upgrade, it can avoid incurring additional costs by sticking with what's already in place.

2: You can still get support

Microsoft has extended the support lifecycle for Windows XP several times over the years. In the most recent of these extensions, Microsoft has pledged to continue providing extended support for Windows XP through the year 2014.

3: It's integrated into Windows 7

As we all know, Microsoft received a tremendous backlash for application compatibility problems with Windows Vista. The company pledged to make these problems go away in Windows 7. Its solution was to include a virtualized copy of Windows XP with Windows 7. Users can work within the Windows XP virtual machine, but Windows 7 was designed so that applications that are installed within Windows XP are available directly through the Windows 7 Start menu. They can be used without the user having to switch between operating systems. While such a solution is definitely innovative, it is another sign that Windows XP is going to be with us for many years to come.

4: It has a loyal following

As I'm sure you have noticed, Macintosh computers and Linux operating systems seem to have almost a cult following. The same sort of thing seems to be happening with Windows XP (not that this is necessarily a bad thing). At every trade show I attend, I meet people who are sold on the idea that Windows XP is the greatest operating system ever created and who plan on sticking with it until the bitter end. I can't seem to recall ever seeing another Microsoft operating system attracting such a loyal fan base.

5: It runs on less powerful hardware

One of the major criticisms against Vista when it was released was that it does not use hardware resources as efficiently as Windows XP does. If you install Windows XP and Windows Vista on identical hardware, the Windows XP machine is usually going to be more responsive. Many organizations prefer using Windows XP over Vista because they believe that it helps improve efficiency and because they won't be forced to retire their older hardware as they might be if they were to upgrade to a newer operating system.

6: It offers better support for legacy applications

Many older applications were developed with the assumption that they would have free rein over the system. In Vista however, applications are much more limited in what they are allowed to do. As a result, many older or poorly written applications won't run on Vista. Although Vista does contain application compatibility settings that allow some legacy applications to function after a bit of tweaking, a lot of users find it less problematic to simply continue using Windows XP.

7: Hardware manufacturers still support it

I do everything I can to make sure that my lab is equipped with the latest hardware. This means that I am constantly buying upgrade components. One thing I have noticed is that even the latest and greatest hardware still comes with drivers for Windows XP. As long as the hardware manufacturers continue to support XP, the operating system is not going away.

8: Netbooks favor it

Over about the last year or so, netbooks have been gaining popularity because of their small size and even smaller price tag. While I have seen at least one Windows 7 netbook, the majority of netbooks on the market seem to be running Windows XP or Linux. Prior to writing this list, I went to a well known electronics retailer's Web site and randomly clicked on a few netbooks. Each one I clicked on included a Windows XP operating system. So even though two versions of Windows have been released since the days of Windows XP, major electronics retailers are still selling brand new computers with Windows XP preinstalled.

9: It has a proven track record

You have probably heard of organizations whose policy is to not adopt any new software products until the first service pack is released. Their reasoning is that by the time the first service pack is released, most of the bugs should have been fixed and the software will be stable and reliable.

This same philosophy is part of what allows Windows XP to be a dominant operating system. It has been on the market for roughly eight years. In that time, it has received countless patches and updates, and the Windows XP core has proven itself to be stable and reliable.

10: What's old is new

As technology changes, operating systems can quickly become outdated. But one of the things that's keeping Windows XP alive is that many of Microsoft's newer add-ons are fully supported on it. For example, Internet Explorer 8 and Windows PowerShell were both developed many years after the initial Windows XP release, but Microsoft allows them to be used with Windows XP. There are no signs that this trend is going to stop any time soon, although I wouldn't be surprised to see support for 32-bit platforms gradually begin to fade away.

About

Brien Posey is a seven-time Microsoft MVP. He has written thousands of articles and written or contributed to dozens of books on a variety of IT subjects.

118 comments
IBDINES
IBDINES

Is there and alternative for facebook

GNX
GNX

Been using XP for a long time an see no reason to change. I am using 7 to write this. 7 is ok, still testing though. Just my opinion.

natomega
natomega

Aaarrrh - Vista Humbug - Purchased a new Toshiba Laptop C2Duo 2Ghz 2Gb Ram Office 2003. Processed a bunch of files and analyses using Excel and Access. Saved files to HD and burnt copy onto DVD (thank God) Did not use Laptop for 2 mths whilst O/Seas. Came back went to use Laptop. Vista locked me out of all my files saying I did not have enough permission rights to open my own files. Immediately P***ed off Vista went back to retailer slapped Notebook onto counter and demanded either he install XP or give me back my money - I now have XP Pro and happy.

pdr5407
pdr5407

I am slipstreaming Windows XP Pro with sp3, because xp is still used on lots of ordinary user's machines.

user support
user support

When TechNet went on tour to release the Beta verion at the end of 2006 some of the features introduced were already available in Apple OS such as Vista Aero, Flip and thumbnails of documents. Google had introduced desktop search. There was a new hardware requirement for deployment; video memory. Our business did not deploy Vista due to the following reasons from your article. 1: Many organizations don?t see the need to upgrade 5: It runs on less powerful hardware 6: It offers better support for legacy applications We went to a Microsoft presentation on Office 2007 and did not upgrade to these reasons from the article: 1: Many organizations don?t see the need to upgrade 4: It has a loyal following From a personal standpoint, I have machines that run Windows XP and Linux and recently bought an Imac to see how that compares.

denkile
denkile

XP, since it has been so widely adopted and used, seems to be an established standard like the telephone systems: landline and cell. XP seems a common resource/asset for our socity. Many have a lot invested in Windows XP: _money in books, software, hardware, etc. _time in learning and experience and knowhow. I do not understand why Microsoft did not continue and improve XP and make a profit from it (other than to "push" or force users to buy new computer systems when the present generation is just enough for XP to really perform freely). Microsoft could: _Sell subscriptions for XP updates and support like security software does. ( $10./yr for online updates: $20. to $40./yr for support). _Significantly improve the XP OS and interface and sell it as XPse (SECOND EDITION). Make the OS more efficient and secure, reduce the wasted motion in the interface, etc. AND keep the option for the more efficient Windows Standard/Classic format. _Stop: the pushing schemes, foolish bipolar ads, impracticle workarounds, and rescind the rant n rage policies and decisions of the past. I hope Microsoft figures it out. The shareholders will eventually after some loss. This is how our system works, without govt czars.

jbelkin
jbelkin

You are right that they are sticking with WINDOWS because they know the devil and do not want to fiddle with another devil whether that's WIn7, mac or Linux ... aka: "THIS THING IS WORKING - NO ONE TOUCH IT!

Roonkin
Roonkin

HogWASHHHH Windows 7 is cleaner and meaner, runs fast on anything you got unless you are running something that is built for Windows 3.1 People need to stop living in the past. XP is in Windows 7 as to ease companies transition into a 'better os' - not because XP is better.

cjnoyes
cjnoyes

While it may not have the best ui, and in terms of features is a bit out of date, It was written well, and the core code which came from NT, and will likely exist for a long time in future versions is sound. What was added to the NT and W2000 code was also sound. I have been able to write applications which run reliably on Windows for many years. I have people still using my Windows 3.1 versions my DOS versions, and my wine32 versions of course.

Jack-M
Jack-M

1 reason XP will be with us for a while is that it's not finished. Nary a week goes by that I don't get a patch, work around, or some other thing MS found and is in the process of fixing. When it's perfected then you'll see a new platform and the process will continue. XP is great and I wouldn't be w/out it but these constant fixes tell me it wasn't finished before it was released. JackM

Techneer~O60
Techneer~O60

Reason 10 ....Although support may fade ... phase out of 32 bit support. It may come as a surprise but XP comes in a 64 bit flavour. If you ave an AMD 64 bit Athlon or better, you can run 32 or 64 bit apls and they run fine. the one thing you do not wont to do: Trust Vista. The SP2 is wicked 'lemony snickets' to use a phrase. This KB update is defective and will ruin your day with an eternal loop... because it stops in the middle of installation and well, good bye system. Have your installation disk because it will be needed to reinstall the system and slip stream SP1 into the disc. That, of and by itself, is the most compelling reason that XP will be around perhaps ..forever?! Yes, that sounds just right!

james_dono
james_dono

I spend most of my life on the computer doing things. I don't spend a lot of time just randomly reading manuals. But after six years, I'm starting develop some expertise; I've learned how to customize my toolbars, I can customize installations, I can use msconfig, Regedit, System Tasks, the Service Applets, even started learning about root kits doing manual virus removal. I'm using the Advanced XP books (which are very cheap now, since most stores consider them remaindered stock). It takes a while to build up expertise, and I hate to throw it away. I kind of wonder, when my friends push me to learn Linux. If I had started learning Linux six years ago, I wouldn't be faced with the prospect of having to relearn all over again. It looks like MS is pretty committed to keeping its userbase ignorant. Just as we get comfortable with something, they pull the rug out from under us. I'm not talking techies here, I'm talking the millions of ordinary users. I've watched their technical support and documentation dry up. Can't find KnowledgeBase articles on Bing. It's a bummer always being incompetent. Just as you gain competency, you get obsoleted. I don't think that's true with Linux.

motie38
motie38

Windows Vista is less efficient by design. It was actually touted as a feature at their TS2 conferences, to force people to buy more expensive and powerful hardware. Microsoft saw the price erosion of PC hardware as a negative thing for vendors, and was trying to force the price of PCs back up. The effort backfired on them, and still is. As PC prices continue to drop, the percentage cost of Microsoft software of the system as a whole continues to rise. This(Microsoft's prices) will become unsustainable as people come to the conclusion they can't justify the cost(of Microsoft software) over low cost or free alternatives. Apple's integrated software/hardware solution is probably the best solution to the problem. Eventually, some smart PC maker will figure out how to follow Apple's lead without building an OS from scratch, and still offer a compelling user experience. How? Pick one of the top GNU/Linux distributions, put some open source programmers on payroll, create a new brand and a line of computers with a custom theme, develop an App store for the brand, and solicit the major software companies(sans Microsoft who wouldn't participate anyway) to port their applications to Linux and offer them in said app store. A company with enough clout like HP or Dell would succeed if they were willing to try, and would save enough money on Microsoft licenses to not only pay their own open source developers, but support the OSS community and increase their bottom line. And at the same time, they would bring some desktop polish to GNU/Linux overall.

zehawk
zehawk

Don't ignore the gaming world. DX10 support is only on Vista and above. My graphics card supports DX10. Latest games have better eye candy with DX10, but (at least for me) its not YET compelling enough to move from DX9 on Win XP to DX 10 on Win 7. But its only a matter of time before I give in :) PS: There is a unsupported port of DX10 to XP, but its spotty at best, and screwed up at worst.

ErickTa
ErickTa

Yes, I know that XP Professional 64-bit is out there, but Microsoft has no intention of supporting it, and as long as they persist in the Windows 7 forced adoption, driver support for XP 64 will be spotty.

scharlaw
scharlaw

The most important reason that XP will remain. There is no upgrade from XP, you have to reinstall all your software. No business can justify the cost or time unless there is an application that only runs on the new OS and they have to have it (We saw how that failed the last time M$ tried that). Most home users won't because they have lost keys and or disks and the current machine works. Home users will also delay the purchase of a new machine for the same reason. The file transfer is nice but you can do the same thing by burning some CD's.

deICERAY
deICERAY

I've used XP since its initial release, and I was SO glad to be free of the Bluescreens of Death... until recently, when GASP - they started appearing in XP!!! MS is secretly changing the code so it no longer works properly and is creating more and more BSOD! And yes, my drivers are current, and no I haven't added any new software and yes I do think XP has a built-in EOL.

karenc
karenc

I still have customers who use W95 and support for that was dropped aeons ago it still does the job they require so they don't care that it's out of date I can pretty much guarantee I'll still be looking after XP systems when Microsoft bring out the successor to W7

ksaldutti
ksaldutti

It's like coming in your front door. Warm, Fuzzy familiar

docotis
docotis

2000pro may not have the following of XP but, The hardware issue is a no-brainer and most XP apps run on it. My favorite OS. XP is a good second choice. 7 will have to wait.

khransdell
khransdell

XP RULES. !! k h ransdell hannibal, mo.

ErickTa
ErickTa

When I first installed it it looked like it Barbie Doll Windows. Garish blue, butterflies, flowers, Fisher-Price interface. I gritted my teeth and found how to get back the classic windows interface as quick as possible. All Microsoft should have done is come out with a proper 64-bit version of XP and they would be set until 2020. XP 64 Pro felt like an unfinished product. I loved it but Microsoft treated it like an orphan and the industry didn't give it enough driver support.

greatnewproducts
greatnewproducts

I have retrofitted about 5 laptops to XP since my clients have gotten new laptops and a) could not get used to Vista or b) did not like the GUI or c) preferred the XP GUI or d) Vista was i n c r e d i b l y s s s l o o o w w w and or unstable. Most of the time I just went to the laptop manufacturers website, downloaded all the drivers for XP and installed XP from scratch with a OEM CD. Clients happy, Laptops running great, I made money. Dare I say it.... Vista is NOT for everyone.

mjc5
mjc5

Me: Hi Boss, I need to talk to you about our computer system. Boss: Oh- oh, is there a problem? Me: Well I think it's time to upgrade to Vista from XP. Boss: Well tell me about it. What are the advantages? Well, it's a little more secure than a stand alone XP system with no extra protection. Boss: Okay. That sounds pretty good. Anything else? Me: well, we have to replace all our machines. They don't have enough horsepower to run this new system. Boss: That's a thousand machines! But if it is worth it, we can do it. Me: We also have to replace a lot of the peripherals too. Boss: so what you're telling me is that we have to replace almost everyone's machines and most of the peripherals to do what we're already doing now? Me: yes. Boss: Can you give me a good reason why you should still work here?

gregrocker
gregrocker

There is nothing that compares with Windows 7. It is light as a butterfly but quick as a bee. 20 minute install with autoloading of all drivers. Runs the oldest programs and games you got, in compatibility mode back to Win98 if necessary. XP is a solid workhorse Ford Fairline (I retract the Dodge Dart reference as it's not that sporty) restored to 19SP3. Win7 is the sumptuous agile Lexus you sink back into. Drive them both to compare.

SkyWlf77
SkyWlf77

...and one of the main reasons I made the switch to Macintosh. I still use an XP machine for gaming, but everything else is now done using Macs. I didn't like the buggy (or non-existant) XP64 drivers and I needed more than 3GB of RAM capability. Vista is horrible and I don't hold out a lot of hope with Windows 7. My Macs are 64-bit and support the memory and processing power I need. Yes, it required a bunch of new software (pretty costly), but the lack of XP64 availability and driver issues forced the switch. I'm not unhappy - I like Mac and always have - but I wish it hadn't have had to be this way primarily for cost reasons.

matthew.sanaker
matthew.sanaker

As a sysadmin, I appreciate the new administration tools in Server 2008, Vista, and Windows 7. I'd also like to start using power management through group policy, not with XP. I'm looking forward to some Server 2008 deployments, and I'd like to encourage our users to migrate to Windows 7 when we buy new PC's. I'd love to get rid of non-security-conscious legacy apps, so that our users don't need admin rights. We'd have less virus removal to take care of, which would result in less end-user downtime. Oh and if anybody on the help-desk can't handle the change, they should find a different line of work. In short, XP is the old gray nag, she worked well in her prime, but she ain't what she used to be.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If it's still running when the support period is up, it's not going to have any problems. You won't get drivers for new hardware, but that doesn't mean an existing system is going to explode after an arbitrary date is past.

john3347
john3347

"2000pro may not have the following of XP but," The fact that 2000 was/is designed as a business OS kept it from having the user numbers of XP. XP, being so "universal", will keep it supported by third party suppliers for many more years than 2000. "XP ain't near dead yet!"

gregrocker
gregrocker

12 X 7 different national editions. Some are the most beautiful pictures ever taken. Google to find them.

ctrogers
ctrogers

I agree that by default, w7 looks silly, but it doesn't take very long to improve it. And I sure as heck don't want to stare at the same basic interface that came out in 1995! 1. Right-click desktop and choose personalize 2. Choose the Architecture theme. 3. Click Window Color button at bottom 4. Select the color: Frost 5. Click Advanced appearance settings in that window 6. Select Border Padding in the Item drop-down 7. Set it to 0, Click OK and Save changes on the other windows. Now you'll have a nice and modern looking OS!

gregrocker
gregrocker

Vista is a nonentity. No tech enthusiast I know would come near it. Win7 is the greatest invention since the computer, more than making up for the Vista debacle. XP is a dated workhorse, like driving a Dodge Dart when you have a Lexus available.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

And you've beat that 'Lexus / Dart' analogy to death. As long as the Dart is paid for and running satisfactorily, why spend money on the Lexus? In this economic climate, if my XP system is still doing the job, why upgrade it? From a business point of view, what do I get in exchange for upgrading dozens, hundreds, thousands of functional XP systems?

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Which is why i was pleasantly surprised to see Vista 64 actually...well...work. I've been using the Business x64 version since rc1 and it has suited my needs quite well. I keep an Xp vm for those pesky times I have an app that isn't 64 bit or vista friendly, which actually isn't that often. I couldn't justify the cost perspective in my own mind to switch to mac, though I am a closet fan of their hardware. If they would release OSx to work on any platform I'd buy it. But I'm not shelling out my hard earned dough for a Mac Pro when my machine has the same specs and arguably similar performance for a fraction of the cost.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Why, because they all read the same bullsh1t that gets spewed around here all day with no qualification at all? XP is dated and should have been ditched early in teh game, when released it was 10X's worse than ANY issues found with Vista, which are purely user ignorance 99% of the time. Users don't think that they should spend more than half an hour learnign how much better Vista usability is, how much more secure it was than XP when XP was that age, how it was no more of a resource hog than XP when Xp was released and everyone ran basic PIII's. Yuor comments are so unqualified they hardly merit space on a free web forum. And a Dart lasted a hell of a lot longer than any Lexus will, was a LOT faster (the 360 Dart was anyway), was stronger and more reliable. Let's see a Lexus after 280K Miles, actually lets look at a Lexus after 100K miles, complete junk.

leo8888
leo8888

I loved the Dodge Dart! So much that I've owned at least 6 of them in my lifetime. They had such a strange, ugly design that they ended up looking cool. And they were some of the the easiest cars to fix. I spent 2 hours cursing last weekend while I changed an idler pulley on my Saturn SW2 wagon. I miss my old Darts!

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

The Dodge Dart is serviceable and fully paid for, whereas that new Lexus comes with a hefty price tag. Most millionaires and millionaires-to-be are sticking with the Dart.

greatnewproducts
greatnewproducts

I used to love driving my Dodge Dart!! I would drive it again if I still had it.... But then again I would also like to drive a Lexus if I had one.... :-)

gregrocker
gregrocker

for my Win7 Lexus. Already got my Signature Edition for havin a party for a few of my beach buds. As for the question of mass upgrades, sure why not stay with XP until it becomes obvious how much you can save by upgrading. But I hope you get to enjoy 7 at home, at least. After beta testing Win7 for a year I recently tried to work on an XP computer and found the slowness, hangs and comparatively primitive features too much to handle.

gregrocker
gregrocker

Rarely respond to haters but I got a chuckle thinkin of you wheezin down the street in a cloud of black smoke, shakin your fist at the young Win7/Lexus whippersnappers while gunnin your rusted-out Dart, the only thrill left when you are a limp 700 pound Glen Beck-listening grump.

leo8888
leo8888

So right! I could take my coffee and donut under the hood with me while I was sitting on the fender changing the starter! Nothing like the cars of today. I like my '98 Saturn SW2 as far as being great on gas and reliable but the couple things I have had to fix under the hood have been knuckle busting nightmares. I can't believe the post from the guy who said that you were lucky to have a Dart make it to 100,000 miles. I bought several Darts with well over 150,000 miles and drove them until I got tired of them and wanted to get one in a different color! The biggest problem with Darts for anyone like me who didn't have a garage was RUST! Sorry for taking this so far off topic!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

That's because there was almost enough room to stand between the wheel wells and the block, and you didn't have to hoist the engine to get to the oil filter :-)

paladin2
paladin2

Point taken but it's more the Dart being like a Colt revolver as to a Sig Sauer automatic. The musket to AK is taking a whole different type of firearm as a flint lock musket and comparing it to a center fire full automatic. No, the Lexus ain't that far ahead. But that aside it was a different time and a different world then I had two Chrysler products in my life, one a Dart and the other a pickup but both with the slant 6 motor. I sold the Dart with more than 200,000 miles on it and never more than a starter or belt replaced or repaired. Last I saw the truck it was over 300,000 miles but I don't know it's maintenance history after I had it but when I had it there was no maintenance more or less. The quality of the bodywork was what it was in those days with less than stellar attention to detail sure, but I beat both of those vehicles and nothing ever fell off or imploded. And I remember fondly that the pickup, new, cost me 1600 bucks and there was no sales tax. Now, not because the product value is that much higher, though it's clearly higher particularly in the technology end. The body work and interior is still plastic and chrome. So it is better but it's not anywhere near 35,000 dollars more (and $2700 sales tax). But way back then the few Japanese cars were considered tinny junk, tho I never had one.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

The Win2KPro era when XP was the same except so insecure it couldn't be trusted, such a resource hog it required new hardware, so bug ridden that MS refused to offer patches until SP1 was released, so incompatible everyone was rolling back new machines to run Win2Kpro? XP was just absolute garbage for two years, until they finally got it together and people's machines were new enough to run it.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

The dart is one of the most reliale and sold daily drivers that Dodge ever made. It was created during the era of muscle cars when they needed to offer a more family friendly sedan than a Plymouth 'Cuda or Doge Charger. The slant 6 was a rock solid block and the build simplicity of the car in general had them last for a million miles, if properly taken care of. The fact that you PUMPED the gas in an Econonline illustrates your inexperience with such matters. I'm a Ford specialist technician, the choke on an old Econloine would always bend and the bi-metal strip would not unwrap. So the easiest way to start one is to put the gas on the floor and hold it while cranking, that opens the choke fully as well as the secondary butterflies and it will start almost instantly. Pumping the pedal will actually cause most carbureted cars to flood, again though, (contary to popular belief) holding the gas to the floor will rectify the flood and start it very quickly. Win2K is much simpler interface but just as capable as XP, unlike the Fisher Price look of WinXP which was actually the most bug ridden insecure OS Ms has ever released, which took four years to stabilize. I had a Dart with a 360 in it too, you could get the front wheels off the ground in a fast start, I rebuilt it in '93 and sold it for a good price, with oversize intake valves, flowed, ported, balanced and blueprinted etc. Nothign wrong with Darts or Econolines, just like computers 99% of the time it was user error. As the help desk says, it was a PICNIC case...[b]P[/b]roblem [b]I[/b]n [b]C[/b]hair, [b]N[/b]ot [b]I[/b]n [b]C[/b]omputer.

Bahooalooi
Bahooalooi

The Dart is the same machine as a Lexus like the musket is the same as an AK47. The Dart was, like most cars of its era, a rattletrap in which 100,000 miles was a major accomplishment, and this was achieved only if you babied it and were willing to repair and maintain it almost constantly. It did have a simple, sturdy engine, but the rest of the car quickly deteriorated around it. I remember those times all too well. We actually believed that was normal (and acceptable)! In the automotive world the bar has been raised and the japanese certainly raised it. When I go back to Win2K (which I once thought was the best thing since ENIAC)I can't believe how primitive it seems. A bit like getting into my '81 Econoline and pumping the gas while cranking the engine for 10-20 seconds before it "catches".

paladin2
paladin2

The Dart has an engine (slant 6) that will be remembered historically as one of the toughest most versatile motors in history. And an old Dart and a Lexus are still basically the same thing. Internal combustion powered 4 wheeled vehicle. With all the new computer operated motor, power curve and torque output it's still basically the same machine. Aside from comfort options the Lexus can do nothing that the Dart can't. And the same holds true for XP and Wista 7. The ride may feel smoother or more comfortable but aside from that the Lexus is no better than the Dart. Now if the Lexus flew or required no driver or something then it would be a different machine. But it doesn't do those things. It just does what the Dart does, but it's prettier.

Techneer~O60
Techneer~O60

Bunkrupt is more like it, if the Reproblicants and Dumbocraps would get off thier AXX and stop screwin' with the hoi polloi, uhm thats us, it would 'nt have happened; but consider furthur: if MS didn't overcharge for software, perhaps all of us would be getting better hiways or health care or..just think about it. Consider how MS has produced PDG software for Business and Home use. they just charge too darn much for it, and then there's Vista, hmmmm, is it possible to see a similarity here, repos and vista. Eureka!Just have a clunker trade in for Vista, give em XP! LOL folks!

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...still won't buy you anything at Starbucks.

greatnewproducts
greatnewproducts

What is wrong with getting paid with IOUS??? I just collect them and use them as tender... Pay the rent, the utilities, the grocer... They are good as cash right??? ;-)

gregrocker
gregrocker

You MIGHT see a Dodge Dart a few times per year here in car crazy SoCalif and it is clear the driver is taking his restoration project out for a Sunday spin. Nobody drives them regularly any longer here, at least. I'm no more than one year behind in my anaology. You are in your Model T shaking a fist at them fancy aeroplanes, in this case the greatest invention since the p.c.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

:) I agree though. Lexus schmexus, they're over-rated. There's something to be said for steel and a cast iron, bullet proof slant 6 or a rumbling big block piece of iron with eight big honkin fire holes in it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

One of the top three mistakes in my life was letting it go. I'd rather have it back and in running order than three Lexus.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

It would blow the doors off of any Lexus made. But there was no leather, ac or radio. :)

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