Education optimize

10 signs that you aren't cut out for IT

IT pros often complain about the downsides of their jobs. But what if you really AREN'T meant for an IT career?

Holiday rerun: If you're taking stock of your future as the New Year arrives, consider one big question. Is IT really where you want to be?

It's a tough world out there. Anyone who's ever worked in IT knows just how tough it is. And if you're not totally up for the challenge, there will always be someone else who is. But for anyone considering getting into the world of IT, or for those considering getting out of IT... how do you know? How do you know whether you are really cut out for the career that chews up and spits out its young? Well, I have a handy list of signs that maybe IT isn't the best fit for you.

1: You lack patience

Patience is most certainly a virtue in IT. When some problems strike, they strike with vengeance and most often require a good deal of time to resolve. If you are without patience, you'll either give up, lose your mind, or pull out all your hair. But the need for patience doesn't end at dealing with problems. Many times, end users will test your patience more than the technology will. If that's the case, I recommend that you either get away from having to deal with end users or (if that's not possible), leave IT immediately.

2: You have no desire to continue your education

IT is an ever-evolving field and without the desire to continue learning, you're already way behind the curve. This is one of those fields where you must be okay with constantly learning something new. That might mean taking a class or attending a workshop or just hitting the books on your own. But no matter how you slice that education, you must be willing to continue to learn.

3: You refuse to work outside 9-to-5

Technology doesn't adhere to a set schedule. Servers go down whenever they want and business must go on. So you must be willing to wake up in the middle of the night, work long hours during the week, and work weekends. If you're someone who refuses to let your workweek interfere with your personal life -- well, the writing on the wall is pretty clear.

4: You don't like people

Do I really need to expand on this one? Yes? Fine. The reason IT pros have jobs is to support end users -- aka people. If you don't like people (and I know plenty who don't), you really shouldn't consider a career in IT. The big irony of this is that I also know a lot of people who have been driven to dislike people BECAUSE of IT.

5: You give up quickly

How many times have you had an issue really test your abilities? Did you give up or did you forge on until you managed to best that problem? If you gave up, you did so knowing that you left something broken. That is not an acceptable work ethic in IT, and if you're okay with that, it's time to reconsider. Oh sure, there will be times when something is beyond repair or an issue goes above your skill set. But if that's the case, it's your responsibility to replace the broken tech or hire someone in to fix the issue.

6: You're easily frustrated

This is an industry that can frustrate even the most unflappable. But if your frustration boils to the surface right away, you will spend much of your day with high blood pressure. Although IT is a rewarding field, it can also be a frustrating one. If frustration often gets the best of you, you might want to consider a new career or stock in a therapist.

7: You can't multitask

At any given point in a day, I am doing three or four things at once. Sometimes, this is the only way I can actually get everything done in the given timeframe. If you insist on sticking to one task at a time, IT is going to be a tough career for you. That is not to say single-minded people can't succeed -- but they will have a tougher time than those who can multitask.

8: You have dreams of climbing the corporate ladder

There isn't much room on the ladder within the IT department. If you have dreams of climbing up and perching yourself on top, you might want to consider a different field. Some IT departments do offer promotions, and maybe you can even climb your way up to CIO. But if CEO is in your dreams, IT is not the field for you.

9: You hate technology

This one should go without saying. But strangely enough, I know people in the IT field who actually HATE technology. If you consider yourself a technophobe, maybe being around servers, desktops, switches, routers, and other IT-centric hardware might not be the best place for you. Although it's perfectly possible to work in a field you despise, the added level of frustrations you will experience might end your time on this good green Earth earlier than you expected. Take a pass on IT.

10: You turn off your phone at night

This relates to your work hours. Many IT pros I work with are on call 24/7. Their lives completely revolve around their networks, and if they weren't willing to have such a life, they probably wouldn't have the jobs they have now. The IT job doesn't go away -- it remains in the background all the time, waiting to pull you from sleep, family gatherings, the birth of your first child. If you're one to turn your phone off when you leave work, or even ignore those calls from the office (even when said office is blowing said phone up), it might be a good sign the that you and your career are not a good fit.

Tallying up the cons

Just because you suffer from one of two of these traits doesn't mean you should jump off the IT train and start flipping burgers. But if you recognize quite a few of these signs, you might want to call it a career and head back to school. To help balance the pros and cons, I'll follow up soon with a list of signs that IT is exactly where you need to be.

Additional reading

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

373 comments
discreteness4me
discreteness4me

Maybe when you're new to the work force and have to pay some dues. Or, maybe when you're so desperate for a job that you'd take anything, no matter how degrading and soul crushing. Otherwise, do not walk, RUN from any such "job". Rejecting 24/7 duties doesn't mean you're not cut out for IT, it means you're not cut out for a lousy job at a lousy company. Even Dilbert has it better than that....

andy.tomasuolo
andy.tomasuolo

let's call it what it really is, "TASK SWITCHING" even CPU's don't multitask, let's all get off this high horse of "I MULTITASK" . Whenever you take your mind off one thing you have to checkpoint where you are and then go back. So enough of this MULTITASKING BULL!

PockDave
PockDave

Disagree with 3 & 10. Companies need to employ enough staff to do jobs at certain times.

mheartwood
mheartwood

http://xkcd.com/705/ I work at a rural ISP. We promise uptime from 8:00AM to 10:00PM Eastern Time. Our UPSes will keep the network up for 4 hours. The back up generator will keep it going for 12 hours. But what happens when you have a 3 day power outage due to a snow storm? I got up at 6:00AM, packed the sled and snowshoes into the Jimmy, along with several cans of gasoline and 2-stroke oil, drove as far as I could, snow shoed the rest of the way, refilled the generator, and got it going. But between 10:00PM and 8:00AM, you'd better believe I turn off my phone. I need to get some sleep sometime.

NickP2012
NickP2012

i like this a lot i printed it out and gave it to all my IT friends

just.a.guy
just.a.guy

I keep seeing this article. Why? So to have fun, I thought I might turn it around. Here is my first shot at it. I am sure readers can do better. 10. You hate ties and white shirts, but think pocket protectors are neat. 9. Spaghetti is your favorite food. 8. You like playing with all of the latest toys. 7. Working at 2:00 AM, weekends and holiday are your idea of a good time. 6. You love inventing and decoding cryptic error messages. 5. You love baby--sitting adults over the telephone. 4. You enjoy reading books with no plot, characters, settings, or adventures. 3. You want to be remembered for creating something that people will curse for decades. 2. You were never good a spelling words. And, 1. If a two-year old baby can help granny, it can't be that difficult. Happy new year!

diek11
diek11

The never ending myth of multitasking, the term is a buzz word that refuses to die.

techrepublic
techrepublic

Asking to give up critical family events or be on call 24/7 by default it is an obsolete way of thinking, I agree still much in use and It may be a need, to a point, for small companies or companies in poor economic and social environments but, in my opinion, a well-managed company, that care about its workers, will have processes in place to avoid these. If a company care about its workers, and shows it, they will be voluntarily on call any time if there is a real need. Otherwise the workers will show the same lack of care about the company and the best workers will leave as soon as they can.

gcorbo
gcorbo

From the perspective of someone in the IT field over 20 years - and currently pursuing a degree in a different field: Point #10 - I agree with several others who responded. This is ridiculous. I have worked with doctors professionally, and as patient - and even they rearrange work to attend to large life events. Additionally, IT is really not so different from many other business function areas. Companies MAKE it more pressure-filled and time specific than it need be, because of things such as cheap ways (read as: "tight budget"), poor management, and conflicts of interest.

uftr
uftr

Women don't have a choice to "miss the birth of their first child", so point 10 excludes women, who statistically are doing better in math and logic type classes than men these days, and point 8 excludes the brightest, most ambitions people who might make the biggest contribution to your IT efforts. I'm retired now, but when I was working in IT, I had to bank a lot of overtime, but there was no question that I could take 3 months off to help take care of my daughter... using that banked time. If your IT department is so understaffed that no one can take time off for family priorities, you are just asking for a big, unresolvable, potentially company bankrupting IT emergency.

meister2681
meister2681

As a doctor myself, I used to have the same ethos as mentioned by Jack. Now, I certainly disagree with point 10 (the rest are fine). My work phone is switched off when I leave the hospital - big organisations will not grind to a halt because a small cog is being rested.

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

Isn't this list from the Management's point of view? Management expects all this and to be worshipped at the same time as Lords of the Universe, while IT workers are personal slaves, not for the good of the company / agency, but as part of Skeletor's Snake Mountain. I loved my job as IBM Mainframe Systems Programmer. I was good at it. The long hours didn't bother me. Being on call was sometimes annoying, but because I was helping people by insuring that everyone in the County got their pay, including the Sheriff's Deputies when Payroll / Personnel and Budget / Finance was run, I counted it a joy to be able to do something mission critical to help the people I liked. But then the two evil Managers who were married to each other in violation of County Law against conflict of interest took over and ruined everything. The IT Director didn't help either. We went from the minimum 5 to maintain the IBM Mainframe to just me. Management was not just too cheap to pay for adequate disk (necessitating that I work long hours and be called at 2AM every morning to manage space), but they robbed the budget to fund their lack of planning (dear, I need another server and didn't put it in my budget -- could you get me the money). With this arrangement, I was downgraded and actually prevented from doing my job -- which I did so very well, they decided they needed absolutely no one to do it and RIFfed me. The last words of the Director to me about herself was, "I don't know what I'm doing". Everyone in the United States is paying for this, seeing as how a Federal Grant is paying $7 million to redevelop the Sheriff's LINKS system into a new platform with absolutely no enhancements. Next year's IT Budget has to be cut 3% and the IT Director hired 12 managers this year to supplement the two she had. She's hired some high concept employees who had to be fired because they weren't doing their job. Meanwhile, not only are the developers and techs who do the job being laid off, but the Development Manager is going to be writing code (while retaining his title and drawing his pay). He and his wife have a yacht where she undoubtedly entertains people from the Chihuly Glass Museum for the which she is a board member (no wonder it's losing money). Time does not allow me to give you the details of how a developer was told to lie to the Sheriff's Department by her IT Management. This nightmare scenario may seem like an aberration, but if it does, you just don't know what goes on in Corporate Management: Go read "Moral Mazes" by Robert Jackall and "Snakes in Suits" by Dr. Paul Babiak and Dr. Robert Hare. After you read the books, then you can answer for yourself just what it takes to do your job AND satisfy management. Good luck. Just remember: It's impossible to be competent in a dysfunctional environment.

likov
likov

What IT means author? My career started as IT guy in small companies, and it was diffucult to me because I dislike dumb and asshole people, prefer to sleep from six to noon and can't really multitask. I spend years to realise I love tech, not people. Now I work with servers. No p.3 (shifts), no p.4 (support guys), no p. 10 (associates).

WMDH
WMDH

1) Along with patience it is sometimes necessary to be a bit firm. Instead of simply solving user problems every time they come, why not help users to solve their own problems where appropriate? 2) Continued learning is a given these days in just about every field: I don't see that it applies particularly to IT. 3) + 10) Even on operational support you need to have some roster system. The same person can't expected to be on 24/7 call all the time. 4) I'm not sure that IT is that particularly a people-facing job. Perhaps for the business analysts, and yes, sure, you need good communication skills. But overall? I'm not that sure the head-down concentration and focus needed to write low-level software are found in the extrovert and people-focused person, who might be ideal for sales and marketing. 5) Sometimes you just don't have the time to re-create every production problem on a test system. That is the reality outside academia. Sometimes a particularly obscure permutation of data, applications running, software versions, machine load etc might not be possible to simulate. And if the error is not occurring on a regular basis, then it might be better to cut your losses, document what you've found out, code in some more logging and instrumentation to help you if the problem does arise again - and then get on with more high priority work. 6) Frustration can also be a good thing. It allows you to sit back and think what you are doing wrong. Why are you banging your head against a particular brick wall. What could you do better? 7) Multitasking is fine, but jumping aimlessly from one task to another is no substitute for good organisation and planning. 8) There are career paths in IT both for techie people and for those looking to get into management. In some organisations the CIO and CTO are among the highest-level people there. 9) Hating technology? Well I hate Microsoft with a vengeance and have still managed to stay in IT for all these years :-)

vampyreapocalypse
vampyreapocalypse

#3: yes, the job comes with some odd hours and long days. EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE. If you're constantly working 14 hours a day, 6 days a week, then maybe you AREN'T cut out for IT. The sign a good IT Pro is one who keeps the users happy and the systems running smoothly. You can't do that? Get outta here! #10: Screw you pal. My personal time is my personal time. Specialize, educate yourself, and the gigs that allow for the "don't bother me attitude" that I have will follow. It took me 13 years to be able to NOT answer the phone at 11 pm on a Friday night after I already worked 15 hours that day, but boy ws it worth it. Constantly on call? Learn to specialize and become the best in your field. The calls will stop. But this guy has no clue about IT, maybe HE should get out of IT.

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

1) We hired a new receptionist recently. The ad specifically said that PC and MS Office skills were required. When I gave the new-hire her user ID and Password she looked at me as though I grown a 3rd eye. I should have patience with this?! 3) I don't mind working outside of regular hours - many tasks MUST be performed after-hours. But I expect to be compensated for that time. Just saying that I'm "on salary" doesn't cut it. When I spend a 3-day weekend in the office, re-working something that couldn't wait, I expect some comp-time. Sadly, that's a foreign concept here. 4) Individuals can be OK but people are jerks. 9) I hate BAD technology. Windows ME, Vista, 8, the Ribbon Interface, Nero's code-bloat, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, etc, etc, etc... 10) Fortunately, there is no one in the office over night that would likely have an IT issue that couldn't wait until the morning. But it is critical to set limits. If the boss wants me to be on-call 24/7 then my compensation package would need a dramatic overhaul. Notice I didn't say just salary.

BitHammer
BitHammer

Are all basically the same. As for liking / disliking people; If you like people, work the help desk. If you dont, write code.

bjtrexel
bjtrexel

IF you like your work and where you work - AND - can eat at the same time - you have a "pretty good" deal. . . I knew/know too many who were 'in it' for the money - AND - MISERABLE! I refused to "carry" free-loaders! (I have, also, retired Twice). . .

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

I like people. I loathe managers. We need a new book: "Vampires in the Workplace" to supplement "Snakes in Suits". At some point, if we work in IT, we should ask "What's in it for me?" not "How can I make my manager's career to the detriment of my own life?". Think of just who benefits from these rules.

oz penguin
oz penguin

You just described most IT managers that I have wroked with, and I mean on most of the points. Therefore I deduct that these are the points to succeed for IT working class and not IT in general. Management will ... 1: lack patience 2: have no desire to continue education 3: refuse to work outside 9-to-5 4: dont like people (at least not the ones they have to work with) 5: give up quickly 6: get easily frustrated 7: be unable to multitask 8: have dreams of climbing the corporate ladder 9: not hate technology, but not understand it 10: turn off their phone at night (especially at family times)

robertemartin
robertemartin

In 1980 I was working for a company that was located in the Washington, DC area. On Thursday morning, I told management that I was taking off that weekend to go see my father who was having serious heart problems (he lived near Charlotte, NC). I was fired Thursday afternoon. Thursday evening I got a call that my father had died.

EnEm1
EnEm1

The reasoning offered in 3 sucks! I am a free-lance consultant and even I don't want to work beyond 5 PM. It's statements like "Technology doesn’t adhere to a set schedule" that justify the slave pens run at places like CISCO. During the hirng process the hiring managers at that "corporation" tell you that they will pay you for 40 hours of work but expect you to work 60; like it's the given! "If you’re someone who refuses to let your workweek interfere with your personal life — well, the writing on the wall is pretty clear". If you _don't_ refuse to let your work week interfere with your personal life, especially if you'e married and have a family then you're staring divorce right in the face! So Mr. Wallen, the writing on the wall is pretty clear to me; You shouldn't be writing at all witohout proper research. Number 10: "This relates to your work hours. Many IT pros I work with are on call 24/7". Well, their lives suck! And if see that as a justification, then you're aiding and abetting in the creation of Morlocks. Number 8: Who says you can't climb the corporate ladder in IT? Mr. Wallen, you come across more and more as an amateur, so tell me, ever hard of Steve Jobs? All the other numbers apply to any individual in any and every industry and if the reasoning behind them is correct then we should all be unemployed.

techrepublic
techrepublic

The 24/7 is good for grandma/grandpa shops, bigger companies have to have some kind of rotating duty if needed. I always turn off my office cell phone at 11pm -- and nobody's gonna disturb my sleep, unless this is part of my contract and I am paid for doing it.

Dr_Zinj
Dr_Zinj

A slave mentality. Your list is easily summed up as your job owns you, not you own your job.

JPVan
JPVan

Sweatshop conditions serve no useful purpose and from different disciplines you can find a better way. The best medical advice; or expect physical and cognitive strain, is that "a 40-hour work week is about right but for limited duration you can move it to 55 hours. Working in non-IT project management, I know what it's like to exceed those guidelines by half and it's not worth it. You'll get to the point where the extra time is counterproductive. Something else I've carried with me for years. The large organization I was with back then brought in consultants with expertise in staffing levels, time and motion studies, etc. Their ideal scenario is a workforce operating at 80% of capacity to avoid mistakes, allow for better working conditions, and produce better results. The article here is 'me, myself, and I' directed when proper teamwork and a good organization would jettison the 24/7 superhero model as unrealistic and not at all sustainable. If that's the way things are where you work, it's time for a separate IT project to build a dynamic knowledge base that would enable well-educated less than X years of experience staff members to share the ready-response responsibility. I may be wrong but these conditions where they exist may be in the realm of closely-guarded secrets to reflect job security concerns. That's a problem in and outside the organization with work/life balance out-of-whack.

BarryM1105
BarryM1105

Well, I suppose the learning curve concept may not be as severe in many jobs. But into todays job market and economy it's all about how much money the owners are making on their investment (your job/salary being a part of that investment) and regardless of individual performance, loyalty, commitment and ROI, if the owners aren't making what they consider to be enough of a profit the employee should be looking elsewhere for employment. Employeers seem to make all sorts of promises which get broken and yet if the individual does not live up to the expectations of the employer it is on to the next job should there be a next job.

dinotech
dinotech

IT exists even when we are sleeping or busy doing other activities. The author certainly didn't write missing the birth of a child as a direct result of being in IT, he wanted to show that we are on the clock for any IT related issue. The first comment by Nat Hansen talked about management. It is important to our profession that we manage our time. If you are the only IT person available to your company it would be a good idea to implement an internship so that way you can have people to fill in when you need to. Of course, we all need time off to regroup, recharge, and reconnect with what is important to us. However, we also need to understand that work needs to get done; it's managing and balancing what needs to get done with what is important. P. S. If you do not perform due diligence in an interview for a job, take the job, and then find out later that the job owns you due to contract obligations, you have no one to blame but yourself. Am I off base here?

Ricky Tandiono
Ricky Tandiono

Career in IT ranging from Executive, Managerial, Sales, Analysis, Development, Support, Research, etc. Not all has similar job scope except that they are in IT related work/industry. Whether you cut it or not in that career is really depends on the job scope. While some of the reasons are not really correct. It depends on which IT career you are refers to, Some of the reasons are quite generic for other career too. For example, you don't like people or dislike multitask, some people in pure development area, they don't necessarily need to talk to people, they have others (e.g. system analyst, tech support) to deal with end user. While reasons like no desire to continue education, give up quickly, easily frustated are quite generic. You need to overcome these issues in any area of career.

rbles
rbles

If you fit the 10 signs you should probably look for a job with a company using Scrum/Agile methodology. You won't need any programming skills.

derasa
derasa

10 signs that you aren't cut out to be a CIO (Wayne Anderson, December 4, 2007) #10 reads: many CIOs are progressing to the CEO position within their company. 10 signs that you aren't cut out for IT (Jack Wallen, December 21, 2012) #8 reads: if CEO is in your dreams, IT is not the field for you.

BillGates_z
BillGates_z

Sure the CEO is ready to jump in 24/7. Don't worry, he'll be right next to you ready to pass the torx.... BWAA HA HA!

markdean
markdean

One of the reasons why I like IT is because I don't really like dealing with people (and by people, I'm talking about end users). I've been fortunate that I've never had to work in Help Desk or Desktop Support positions since I started in the server world. That was one of the things that drew me to those positions. I rarely deal with people as a Systems Engineer. Sure, I'll deal with DBAs, programmers and other consumers of infrastructure, but not the sniveling, whiny end users. If I had to, I'd be leaving IT and do something else. As for _never_ being able to be away or turn you phone off for a period of time (you are correct, turning it off _every_ night won't do), that's simply not true. My life does NOT revolve around my network or servers-and I'm a Senior level engineer for a major company. In every place I've worked, although you are required to be on call 24/7/365, if you are going to be "out of pocket"-completely unavailable-i.e. your wife goes into labor, you are out in the middle of nowhere camping etc., all you do is let them know you are going to be out of pocket and simply unavailable. You won't get fired (and if you do, then you should consider it a blessing-no job is worth that kind of crap). I've been doing this for 25 years now and I've never missed anything important like births, school functions, graduations, anniversaries etc. and I go camping every year where cell service is spotty at best.

backthatthingupyoyoyo
backthatthingupyoyoyo

Allow them to, and they will take every last drop of blood, leaving nothing but an exsanguinated corpse! If they want me in after hours, the damned CIO had better be willing to be there as well. PERIOD!!!! And don't even get me started on the subject of MULTI-TASKING. In my experience, that word is simply an OVERBLOWN way of saying get-it-all-done-at-the-same-time. I've observed MTs time and again; instead of doing 1 thing well, they do many things poorly. So, JACK-o, perhaps you only THINK you're MTing well. While it appears to work, people are NOT CPUs. When human beings switch "context", invariably something will eventually be overlooked. Like surgeons who leaves SPONGES in a patients body during operations... OH YES, IT DOES HAPPEN! Don't know where you get your information, just don't quit whatever burger-flipping, day job you have!!!

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

I believe it was the Senior George Bush as President of the United States that changed the salaried exempt law from applying only to supervisory and management jobs to include anyone over a certain salary range -- with the caveat that if you were considered "vital" to the business / agency you worked, you were also exempt (and I don't know what the $ breaking point is now, but I think it was $38,000 per year at the time). Now as for this list, except for one or two of the items, this is a list which may have been valid 30 years ago, but in today's modern world, truthfully, if you aren't a political animal with "Executive Ability" (which means you lie effectively and convincingly) as some smarmy psychopath, your career probably isn't going anywhere and you will probably work long hours for low pay, if you even have a job at all. You are a disposable resource in the dysfunctional chaotic confusion which can, in all probability, particularly in the eyes of really rotten incompetent narcissistic management, be outsourced to contractors or to overseas. And in the United States with Obama Care (better known as the very expensive heavily taxed Heath Care Rationing Program), it is likely that you will have your hours cut so the company doesn't have to pay for your health care. You'll work long hours at strange times, but you'll still be classified as "part-time" with the caveat that some how -- darn it all -- you'll still be "exempt". That friends, is where we are going. My opinion (based on current facts and obvious trends) is that Washington D.C. is an open air insane asylum and our elected officials are all crazy. This is a business assessment and not a political statement.

shahjs2002
shahjs2002

in this case i am suitable for IT Field because these all things i already face and still in the field. with new fresh and exited mind.

greg.dargiewicz
greg.dargiewicz

I don't think it's fair to single out IT as being responsible for "a lot of people who have been driven to dislike people because of IT." I have yet to have a job that didn't increase my dislike of people! I like individuals well enough, but as Agent K says in Men in Black, "A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky, dangerous animals...." That fact gets more stark with every passing year!

varun_vkg
varun_vkg

its like eye opener for me if i think about my last 5 year nature of study and work it is very clear that i m not the one who relates to IT 1. You lack patience - yes ( i dont have patience to stick to one problem , i always skips not go for solution ) 2. You have no desire to continue your education - > exactly 3. You refuse to work outside 9-to-5 ------------- i want to work only in fix hours 4. You don’t like people ---> i like to interact people 5. You give up quickly --> again yes like point one 6.You’re easily frustrated --> yes being impatience 7. You can’t multitask --> yes one thing at a time , thats how i my life goes , at that time of stydy(MCA) i havent tried to get job 8. You have dreams of climbing the corporate ladder - i dont have any dreams ( just a stable and growing earning thats what i want from my career ) 9. You hate technology - i dont hate but yes i dont like to use it 10. You turn off your phone at night - like point 3 , dont want to work other then shift now what are the option in front of me .

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

Companies and agencies will take advantage of people any way they can. A recent poll showed Dish to be the worst possible company to work for: Low wages, long hours, not much in paid holidays (can't get the day after Thanksgiving off). The owner is a billionaire. People who work for the company are there to make him rich. People who leave the company look better after they are gone awhile and probably will live longer better lives. Morale is low. People never know when the next 'culling' will take place. Customers complain of rude service. This seems to be the modern corporate model. It's great to do something you love and provide service to people and feel good about it. It's quite another thing to be used up for the narcissism and profit of sociopaths and psychopaths -- and there are more and more of those in management every day that goes by. In management, integrity should intersect with competence. The trend is the opposite direction.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

That would be one that wants them healthy so they are doing what they are paid for, instead of lying about in bed. That would be one that wants to retain its people, because recruiting and training are expensive. That would be one that wants to treat them properly, because even if you win in the court or tribunal, lawyers are expensive. That would be one that wants them to work safe, because insurance is a significant overhead, as are lawyers and damage awards. If none of the above were true, our wives would still be blowing the owner so we could keep our jobs, and we'd still be shoving "our" kids in to the machinery to keep it running. "Cares"...

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

on point 10. I didn't specialise to do it, but having spent a good deal of time as a one man shop one thing I Iearned to do was to make sure call outs were very infrequent. Robust code, good help, preventative maintenance, good training, monitoring and auditing. Saying that, I got paid for being available for call (10% of my salary), not for being called. A lot of firms shoot themselves in both feet with that one, reward performance not failure. Now I'm not saying a bloke looking at his next set of bills, a pocket full of loose change and a couple of kids in last years clothes would deliberately engineer a failure, but maybe, just maybe he won't try real hard not to have one. One sign you are not cut out for corporate life, you can't smile when being managed by idiots...

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

as well as on management's ability to assess support requirements...and hire replacements when needed. .When your customers work 24/7 and you're shorthanded, the long days and weeks are a regular occurrence.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

Before we hire someone who needs basic Office skills, we give them a test. The HR gives them a printed WORD document with all sorts of fonts and formatting and they have to create one just like it. For EXCEL, there's a spreadsheet and we ask them to put in some fornulas with conditional formatting, subtotals and stuff.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

Sorry to read that. However that is an extreme situation and your company was cruel. I got two weeks off as bereavement leave when my mom died.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

The final determinant is still the duties test. Developers and the like most likely fall under the computer professional exemption, but most IT support, regardless of pay rate, will be non-exempt. . http://www.flsa.com/computer.html

Adam_12345
Adam_12345

"a lot of people who have been driven to dislike people because of IT." I think that in every profession you will find nice or arrogant people. In IT there are many arrogant people because they think that they have a sort of control via keyboard which in real life is a illusion. As someone said once: "sometimes you need a man that pulls the trigger". :). People who deals with IT in every day life are not knowledgeable in every direction, subject etc and they are just people who makes mistakes. You will be always able to find the errors in their deeds because of your curiosity or accidentally and that makes their arrogance very vulnerable.

Adam_12345
Adam_12345

my opinion is that you need a simple job (because you're bored) with higher earnings that allow you to make a regular living and then you can roll back with your interest, memories and hobby to your early life and decide what your real interest are.

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

County rules: All the developers and all the systems people were exempt. The admins, data control and operators were hourly.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Developers and systems people fall under the "computer" exemption, but admins, data control, and operators don't.