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10 tasks to keep your IT department productive during slow times

When work slows down, it's smart to catch up on back-burner tasks. You can keep your techs busy and get some necessary (but neglected) chores out of the way.

Every minute of every day isn't filled with emergencies, data migration, backup cleanup, and end-user babysitting. Sometimes, you find yourself faced with engineers who have nothing to do. Naturally, you don't want those brilliant minds idle -- or else you'd have World of Warcraft parties breaking out in the department. So what can you do when slow times strike? Well, it's simple. You tackle the tasks that you're normally too busy to get to. Here are 10 chores that will keep your department humming, even when there are no front-burner issues to deal with.

1: Clean up the shop

The shop (or departmental offices) can get out of sorts when life is hectic. But a clean environment is much more conducive to efficient work. When things are slow, why not take a moment to clean up the office? This could be as simple as a good sweep, dust, and shine or as involved as getting rid of older and dead tech and completely rearranging the furniture for a better layout.

2: Make patch cables

You can never have enough patch cables. And although it's simple to order 3-, 5-, 7-, 15-foot cables, you don't always have the perfect length. Buying spooled cable in bulk and RJ45 connectors is a heck of a lot cheaper than buying bags of precut and pre-terminated Ethernet cables.

3: Get cables under control

Open up that server closet. What do you see? A minefield of thick, worm-like cables ready to tangle your feet at every step? Downtime is a great time to bring order to that chaos. It goes without saying you must do this without disrupting anyone's work, so this could be a job for early morning or after hours.

4: Learn something new

IT is an ever-evolving field. That means education. Slow times offer a perfect opportunity to have your engineers learn something new. They don't necessarily have to take classes. It could be as simple as having them work with a new coding language or having high-level admins teaching lower-level employees their way around more complex systems. Any knowledge employees can share with one another is a good investment in time.

5: Clean up your code

Sometimes, when things are crazy, we don't write the cleanest code. Or we may forget to comment it. We all know the benefit of clean code -- easier debugging and rewriting and, in some cases, more efficient execution. We also know that when code is written poorly, it can be a real pain to clean up -- so slow times are well suited for taking on this sigh-inducing task.

6: Test new systems and software

We're all, always, looking for new systems to use. The thing is, we rarely have the time and energy to actually test out new systems. What about that new open source CMS you've been dying to give a go? Or the groupware? Slow times give you a great opportunity to get those systems up and running and hammer them to see if they'll do the job you need them to do.

7: Document systems and software

This is one of the last tasks that ever get done, but it's one of the most important. Without documentation, your systems rely upon your engineers to remember everything. Unfortunately, employee turnover is inevitable. When people leave, you still need to be able to log on to those mission-critical servers. Take this opportunity to begin the process of documenting your systems, software, users, etc. In the end, you'll be very glad you did this.

8: Audit your network

Do you know every piece of hardware on your network? You should -- or at least you should have it on paper. Downtime gives you a chance to audit your network and create both digital and paper maps of that topology. At some point, you will be happy you took the time to do this. Just make sure that if you include passwords in this map, you place it in a secure location (like a safe).

9: File paperwork

Your company might still do everything on paper. Or you may have already gone digital. Either way, there is most likely some form of paperwork to be done. And if you're like many IT shops, you're already way behind in the paperwork department. Now is the perfect time to catch up... and maybe even get a bit ahead!

10: Run a security audit on your servers

You never know when you're going to get hit by malicious hackers hoping to make you another notch in their belt. Now that you have some downtime, this might be the perfect moment to run a full-scale security audit on your servers. Armed with this kind of information, you can harden those systems so you don't have to worry about security when you don't have time to worry.

Other tasks?

If you take on these tasks, you will keep your techs busy and push your department forward with efficiency, security, and skills development. What other projects do you tackle when there's a break in IT's regular workload?

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

14 comments
RMSx32767
RMSx32767

When you have "cleaned up" your code, don't forget to begin the testing cycle from the beginning. Only God knows what new undocumented features your cleanup introduced.

gabbynizri
gabbynizri

After you have tested, documented and made some audits i would recomend you Automate what ever you can! its time for taking these manual, daily repetitive tasks and automate them so when your business get out from the slow down, you will be ready to make it happened very fast and efficient - see what you can automate quickly and you and your company can benefit from it 5 IT process Automation Challenges and how to overcome them http://runbook-automation.com/5-it-process-automation-itpa-challenges-and-how-to-overcome-them/

j2will
j2will

Don't forget the need for training techs in new software, hardware, and other technologies that have recently been adopted by your organization. It also helps to cross-train techs in the basics of every technology used by the corporation to incluide telephony, wireless, ITV, and video conferencing.

bobijub
bobijub

so you're a neat shop, have recovery plan, regular, tested backups for the really important. but even in a neat shop there are other things to backup. you can do some "irregular" backups for the not so importants, plus review and clean up outdated, details-forgotten temporary copies created in emergency situations if only the first part of the first sentence is true, than just simply do irregular backups, test them, and so on.

jamesbrummel
jamesbrummel

11) Clean yer drives. Bloated network drives full of junk are fun rummage through and delete. You can make a game of it, play dress up or maybe have a yard sale with those 10GB crash dumps you've been "meaning to look at" since 2007. The kids love being handed a bunch of directories labeled "Backup" no one remembers. You may even find some cash! 12) I agree, documentation is not a rainy day past time. It is an essential element of fault tolerance.

Dyalect
Dyalect

Agreed. You shouldn't wait until "quiet" time to document processes / procedures.

jtwigg
jtwigg

I would promote documentation to item #1. documentation is something that is always behind

michaellashinsky
michaellashinsky

No, you chouldn't, but if you already have fallen behind, quite time is the time to get caught up. I think that was the point of the article.

MikeGall
MikeGall

I try to document as I go. It sometimes takes twice the effort to do it later. Things like: what IP did I give that database server? Add it to a wiki or something while you configure it rather than wait till later and have to run a nslookup or whatever to find it again so you can add it. Once it is documented it is a lot easier to configure clients properly because again you don't have to look up the ip from a console every time your setting up the connection. Next up why this is good: hardware/software installed on clients leaving the lab. Heck half the time you'll forget what you called that system. You end up having to go to the persons office to get the computer name then fiddle around with it to see what all you installed on it and document it etc. Much easier to add the computer name/location and stuff on it when you actually have it in the lab to play with. Most times the user won't know you spent an extra 10 min with their new machine before giving it to them anyways.

Pete6677
Pete6677

Undocumented systems give you job security :)

syftkog
syftkog

In this age we are in due to economic woes, documenting everything might not be too good of an idea . Yeah ! Be careful !

Worth2Cents
Worth2Cents

Economic woes may mean the now over-paid guru gets the axe, leaving the dime-a-dozen noobs left to figure things out. To the bean-counters, two 40K new-hirers is better than one 80K Zen Master.To them, IT workers are replaceable minions, while managers and execs get to count on such subjective concepts as intrinsic value of knowledge and experience. Case in point, my company found it cheaper to migrate a system to a brand-new platform, rather than to keep maintaining the old one and the only guy left who knew how to fix it. Being a very, very expensive core business system kept him employeed for over 30 years, then all of a sudden, that couldn't save him anymore. (He was 58.)

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