IT Priorities

10 tech products that belong to the walking dead

Deathless, slow moving, yet relentless, the walking dead are among us in the form of scary, disintegrating tech bits that refuse to die. Here are 10 that need the double-tap.
iStock_000026815344Small_spooky_johnnorth.jpg
 Image: iStock/johnnorth

 The zombie horde has nearly reached critical mass. Other than not nomming my gray matter, the only thing I would ask is that they take certain technologies back to the grave with them. There are some tech products and services out there that simply refuse to die! Why? Because some users and companies are frightened to give them up!

Well, I'm here to say it's time to let those pieces of technology amble off into the sunset with the walking dead. Which technologies? I have ten of them...here they are.

1. Windows XP

The death of Windows XP will mean a lot of companies are going to have to make a major choice: which platform to migrate to? In all honesty, it's time for XP to go away. It's been around for as many years as the "Friday the 13th" franchise has entries. And like Jason Vorhees, Windows XP has had its time and should be buried. The biggest problem with the death of XP is the massive amount of hardware that will go with it. That hardware could be re-purposed (with Linux) or recycled. It should not simply be chucked into the dumpster to find its way to landfills. That is a ghost story that will come back to haunt us.

2. AOL

I cannot tell you how many times I've had to troubleshoot a problem on a client machine, only to find out they still use AOL. Can you imagine my horror when I see this? Why? Why? Why?!!! AOL should have died a tragic death long ago. And what's worse, some of these clients are using AOL for their business communication. For the love of Clive Barker, Gmail is free and considered far more respectable than AOL. Leave behind the Grand Guignol trappings of AOL and live!

3. Blackberry

This one is a tough one. Anyone that travels frequently will tell you how desperately they cling to their Blackberry. It's cheaper to travel with. But the truth of the matter is, the technology is as dated as Full Moon Videos. Supporting Blackberry can be a nightmare and most administrators would rather users make the move to Android or IOS.

4. Dot matrix printers

Seriously...they still exist. I'm fairly certain Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly used dot matrix printers to print the first edition of Frankenstein. Why are they still around? Is it because some grave-robbing company still has tons of paper for the devices and doesn't want to part with that profit? Those printers should have died years ago. Let them go...please.

5. Fax machines

These are the stuff that drove the machines of torture during the Marquis de Sade era. They smack of mimeographs and modems. Technology has come so far – to the point where we can actually sign documents and send them with more reliability and security than the fax allows. Although there are plenty out there who would argue that the fax is too far ingrained into the world of business to go away, the ability to sign and send PDFs have clearly made the fax a ghost in the machine.

6. Internet Explorer-only web sites

Why are there still those out there coding websites to only work with Internet Explorer? Those sights are zombies in the world of business – slow moving, refusing to give up their narrow-minded scope, and causing no end of frustration and horror to those that have to interact with them. Companies need to come to grips with the fact that IE is not the juggernaut it once was. Developers need to create sites for every browser – including mobile browsers.

7. Internet Explorer

The Microsoft browser is riding on the coattails of it's former glory. Now? It's unsafe, unreliable, and as buggy as a rotting corpse. With so many other, superior, browsers available, everyone on the planet needs to stand up to the face of death that is IE and hold up the Chrome cross and the silver bullet of Firefox and back that sub-par browser back to the crypt.

8. Pagers

Hello? The original version of "The Evil Dead" called and wants its technology back. Pagers were cool in the 80s. Pagers were necessary in the 90s. Now? Pagers are simply a holdover for industries that simply don't want to acknowledge the ever-evolving scope of technology. Yes, it would mean setting aside an investment made decades ago, but it's time to make use of smart phones and give up the pagers (aka “beepers”).

9. VHS

There's a “found footage” horror film called V/H/S. If you can get beyond the found footage format (and the brutality of the film), it's not that bad. There was also a little title called "The Ring" which foretold of your death within seven days of watching a video on VHS. That premise wouldn't be possible today because they only people with VHS are convenience stores and businesses holding on to old-school surveillance tech. VHS is dead and buried. Let it go.

10. DSL

Connection speeds continue to shoot through the roof...at least with some forms of technology. DSL? Not so much. If we were back in the 90s, the speeds and reliability of DSL would be unimaginable. Now? Comparing the speeds of DSL and cable is like comparing the walking speed of zombies from "Night of the Living Dead" and "28 Days Later." There is no comparison! Period. On top of slow speeds, the technology used to deliver DSL is as ancient and creepy as Vincent Price in "The Abominable Doctor Phibes."

There are so many tech products that should be in the grave; but for whatever reason, people hold on to their tech like their lives depended upon it. I say it's time to let the beast free and embrace the light of evolution and superior technology. Anyone refusing to upgrade is nothing more than meat for the walking dead.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

103 comments
Treknology
Treknology

Dot matrix printers are cool. When loaded with a long-life carbon ribbon, they are excellent for event logging. Power failures or other interruptions mean only a line of data is lost, not an entire buffer.

Fax machines will stick around because even the CEO can use one (at least the older kind).


VHS or Beta? I paid $900 for a CLOCK! I must keep a VHS machine running for several more years until I have finished format-shifting much archived material that will never see the airwaves (or other form of distribution) again.


DSL? In Australia, many of us are extremely lucky to get even that!

Ebyau
Ebyau

Any seriously using the floppy drive?... It ought to fall in the hall of past technologies! Probably, that is why no one has it mentioned here. Still, I see new Desktops bundled with floppy drives. Even for making boot CDs, one can simply make a floppy image using software like WinImage and slip it into a  boot menu etc...

courtneytrautweiler
courtneytrautweiler

With data caps on Wireless and Satellite internet, and Cable & Fiber non existant in rural areas,  DSL is usually the only game in town.  So a 6 mb unlimited data DSL connection is better than having to pay out of the nose for higher speeds or counting your Mbs.  I have three computers, two iPads and two iPhones on that connection with no problem.  Netfix streams great too. 

Trilln451
Trilln451

I will continue to use XP as long more current versions of windows will not run the CAD software that I use to make money. To those who think I should bite the bullet & upgrade, I say that's thousands of dollars, just because software companies need to find new ways to suck money out of my pocket.  No.

I will continue to use fax machines as long as I need to deal with people & businesses who don't have email addresses. I'm referring to people who Make Stuff.  Many people who are really good at making stuff are older & just not hep to Teh Interwebz.

DSL - this is going to be a Battle Royale. I live & work from an older house, & we chose DSL in the first place because of my husband's objections to cable installers drilling holes, plus I personally don't care for cable companies' business model "We provide a service, you pay lots of money every month. If something goes wrong, we'll send someone out at some point who may or may not solve the problem. Remember in the contract you signed we clearly stated in 4-point print that we aren't promising the service will work reliably. And we reserve the right to crank up prices whenever we feel like it, but you are locked in for the period of time you signed up for."  We went with DSL because we already have a land-line, & the start-up process was relatively painless.  We're happy with the speed, reliability, & the price. We DON'T CARE about being able to watch 154 channels, because we don't watch TV much - I watch most of the shows I like on the Web.  I DON'T WANT CABLE.  DEAL WITH IT.

Anyone here read "Snowcrash"?

tomi01
tomi01

At least one company has got it right even if MS can't seem to get it straight.  XP will be continued after the plug is stupidly pulled by MS.

If MS had a subscription based revenue stream for supporting XP instead of creating insane OS's nobody wants, the following company would not be necessary.   However, thankfully where there is a need there is a market.  So this company is now getting ready to fill that need: 

http://www.arkoon.net/en/stormshield-2/arkoon-annonce-son-offre-de-service-extended-xp-pour-assurer-le-maintien-en-conditions-de-securite-des-postes-sous-windows-xp-apres-avril-2014/

Marc Erickson
Marc Erickson

4.  Dot matrix printers - are still used in industries where multiple copies of a document are needed quickly.  I had an auto parts store as a customer in Edmonton, AB that used them to make 4 or 5 copies of an invoice at the same time.  one copy would be a pick list for the warehouse, one a shipping bill of lading, etc. Okidata still manufactures dot matrix printers.


7.  I agree about Internet explorer - but Firefox ain't so great these days.  Have you noticed the memory leaks?  No?  Open some more tabs, and you will.

Obdurodon
Obdurodon

Others have pointed out what's wrong with including DSL on the list, so I won't bother.  Let's take a look at what's missing.

  • CRTs.  Energy- and space-hogging monsters.  Fortunately, they do seem to be going away on their own.
  • POP email.  Like many people, when I first had to deal with separate machines (work+home) I learned the joys of having inconsistent mailbox views and messages "stranded" on one machine because POP just can't handle multiple clients gracefully.  Then I switched to IMAP, those problems disappeared, and I've never looked back.
  • Adobe Flash.  The update frequency is up to about one a day, and still can't keep with the security-hole frequency.
  • Email lists.  I was on Usenet in 1983, because even then it was a better way to deal with group communication.  Here we are thirty years later, with so many better tools (like this one) at our disposal, and some people still insist on doing things via lists.  Worst of all are the Linux kernel hackers - people who are supposed to be technically adept - who still use it not only for conversations but as a poor man's code-review tool too.  What Luddites.

Special bonus item after having to log in to post this:

  •  Sites that require their own special log in instead of integrating with an established identity provider.  Extra bonus Stupid Points if the login process is slow, flaky, and has "unique" password rules that have been proven to do nothing for actual security.
Cuntspicuous
Cuntspicuous

Writing about the death of Windows XP, is like writing about the death of Jesus Christ, it ain't gonna happen; ever. Computer manufacture and software mafias extort money, preventing our old software from running on newer systems. (;-)}

willis0966
willis0966

I visited a supplier the other day and they printed a 3 part form on a dot matrix printer.  I asked what they were going to do when it broke.  They said, "We have three spares..."  One of these days, I suppose they will run out of spares.  

Microsoft will stop support for XP but it will still continue working.  If anyone has a problem that can't be handled internally, I suppose they will have to do something.  I'd bet XP will be around 10 years from now.

alwaystherecomps
alwaystherecomps

All my tech minded and scary friendly friends need to read this.

Heie
Heie

If  XP is dead. Then attacks will not be targeted at it. So, it may be more reliable. The problem i see is perfectly good hardware and software that does not work with newer MS systems. There seems to be a fundamental change in philosophy since Bill left. MS became #1 by producing better product for lower cost than the competition. 

NickNielsen
NickNielsen moderator

1. Windows XP.  Maybe.  I'm still supporting it for now, but we'll see what the next POS equipment upgrade cycle brings.

3. Blackberry.  If you're an international business traveler, nothing else is as versatile and reliable for the cost. End of line.

4. Dot matrix printers are the only available means of simultaneously printing multiple copies of a document and will be for the foreseeable future.

5. The fax is acceptable for certain purposes under law.  Signed PDFs, not so much until the laws are changed.

10. There are areas of the country that would welcome DSL, because they still don't have anything faster than dial-up.  Too many other areas only have access to a single high-speed option, cable, from a single over-priced provider.  For example, AT&T finally made Uverse available in our area; DSL gave us a usable connection for about half what TimeWarner charges for RoadRunner basic. 

fritzrichter
fritzrichter

#6- Site and sight.  I think being a grammar cop is OK if the error is in the article.  If it's in the comments, I'm hands off.

wossler
wossler

Another example of a Microsoft hater......Doesn't want to admit that the technology age we live in is very much based on Microsoft's success.  Wants us to believe we would all be better off if you used his favorite toys.  I wonder if he realizes he's playing with a variation of a theme that's been around for 40 years. However, due to the "open source" nature, an inability to create a stable consistent product has stopped if from ever doing what Microsoft has done.  Microsoft may not be the Rolls Royce you want, but like McDonald's it's consistent, you can count on it being there, and you can find it (and help with it) everywhere.

Billb114
Billb114

I'd say it appears that the relative success of a column here is measured by the amount of comment it generates - so of course, bashing some perfectly usable old favorites is going to produce a "successful" column.  'nuff said.   

hanekwj
hanekwj

This article is very much "We're all living in America" like:

Steve, in some countries, outside of Europe and America, 100MB or faster fibre connections are stil 40+ times more expensive than ADSL.

One technology that you should address is probably JAVA or software companies that use it and dont port to later versions!

Who has not had a problem with some version of JAVA? How often do you have one application that needs 1.6 and onother that needs 1.7 and neither applicaions run on the other version and its third party apps so you cant change it. And this is quite rethorical; how often do they have to plug up security issues?

And since Mozilla introduced plugin blacklisting we have to use something else because those JAVA 1.6 apps wont run in Firefox anymore because 1.6 is... BLACKLISTED! So in that regard IE wins, atleast the user can still decide what version plugin to use.

Keith1958
Keith1958

If  Jack thinks windows XP is old then what about OS/2, I still support 100s of machines running that, along with the legacy hardware that goes with it :-)

ahanse
ahanse

Hey Fellas

I think techrepulic web site should go to the top of the list... 

Due to the outrageous claims put forward, I wonder if Jacks just jossing with us...

PhilippeV
PhilippeV

DSL is defnitely not dying and continues to progress. In many places it is even faster and more cheper than cble or now even optical fiber !

DSL now exists at 1 Gigbit/s in places where cable or old fibers cannot even deliver more than 200kbit/s (and there are not any plan before long, to replace or upgrade those old cables or fibers whose problems are worsening over time; operators prefer building new networks elsewhere where they need most of the money for the getting the underground infrastructures, or to buy new licences for 4G/LTE frequencies, and locations for wireless antennas, and it makes sense for these operators because they have far better and faster financial ROI for these investments to continue competng to the run for speed for most users that don't want to pay more).

I can't say that DSL is good everywhere, it will still be a companion tehcnology that helps filling the whiteholes. But zapping the technology with nothing else still available to replace it at reasonnable cost would definitely be suicidary, you cannot compare these technologies globally when there are many complex situtations on the map where one wins over the other one.

You absolutely don't know which other techology will replace old DSL: this could be fiber, or cable, or wireless 4G, or electric wires, or some publicly coordinated fast WiFi network. We can get fast global imporvements only when you combine the techologies and use them where they can be delivered rapidly at smallest prices.

They are only replaced when they start costing more to maintain than to replace (the same will be true for Windows XP, IE, or all the listed items above). When things are working quite well and have almost zero maintenance cost, why will you replace it by something new which costs you lot of money to rebuild and maintain and that will fail more often?

Don't be so religious about technologies. Militate for technical neutrality and if thinags are working for what people need, people will definitely not be likely to replace it. The inverse situation is where new technologies are built specifically to fail (programmed obsolescence, such as small pieces of plastic preprogrammed to break and used ina printers to support important mechanical constraints, such as paper feeders, chemincal condasentors with cases that will start leaking after less than 2 years of use, soldered batteries in smartphones when we all know they will stop working reliably after less than 2 years, and so on)

Those things to refuse to die are inafact those products that have proven beinag usable for the longest time and that now cost youa almost nothing (they may stiall have problems, but not more often than the new products supposed to replace them, and that have still not reached the same level of stability).

=========

One bad product refuses to die : CNET bad javascripts full of bad trackers that make THIS forum more and more unreliable (or take infinite time to process input, due to its very LAME unsecure scripts or required permissions for LOTS of cookies, and many compatiability buags in their taoo complex / uantested javascripts).


sourav_dey
sourav_dey

Not totally agreed with the list. I used Internet Explorer 10 while commenting.

symowallo
symowallo

As always, Jack Wallen can't resist taking a stab at Microsoft.  I long for the days of UNBIASED reporting.  Obviously this guy is so tainted and so bitter that he can't see the world for what it is, a REAL WORLD.  IE9, 10 and 11 are quite good, but he will dislike anything coming from Redmond just... because... He hates them!  Did Bill Gates eat his first child or something?

b2btechcopy
b2btechcopy

You need to do a Google or Bing search on browser usage.  You see the most recent month and year browser usage, statistics, shows IE usage around 30 percent.  Google Chrome and Firefox take up approximately similar percentages.  So IE is not going away anytime soon.  But I use the above 3 browsers and add Opera to the mix.  I use IE only when needed.

DSL?  I think ATT Uverse has DSL in the hardware mix somewhere and it's very popular.

Folks will give up XP when the security updates and support goes away - only a few months away.

I only use the AOL mail, which works just as well as Gmail, Hotmail and Yahoo.  I do have multiple email accounts and AOL is one of them.

I won't  touch a tech product where the company is struggling financially.  I'll stick with Android and Samsung, but I have no bias against folks who like IPhone and Apple products.

Dot Matrix printers?  Just check if Amazon and Walmart still sell them and it will address their continued use question.

VHS is too bulky for me.  Don't know why they still hang around.
tvmuzik
tvmuzik

The writer hates XP for the obvious reason that XP is still kickin azz to this day.  I intend to use XP for as long as I can; followed by Win7 Ultimate as a backup OS.

As for VHS, I have the original "Godzilla vs Megalon" VHS movie as a collection item, and its original Japanese language version; and I'm not gonna part with it. I'll have it transferred to DVD, but I'm still gonna keep the VHS version.

But I must agree that AOL and Internet Explorer has Gotta go.

cityboy3
cityboy3

Is this just a Microsoft hate site?....WTF

bgoodgion
bgoodgion

DSL ???? Are you joking - I have 12mbps vdsl2 that works great, thank you very much.  It's more affordable and reliable than the cable alternative in my area.  I don't believe it belongs on any list with dot-matrix printers! 


psengr_techrep
psengr_techrep

"Wallenite: a person who does, just because he can, eagerly adopting whatever is new, and condemning whatever came before regardless of utility, simply because of age". 

Unless a person must be in constant contact with "friends" Twittering his hours away, and/or has so little self-worth that he must bolster it with new toys,  there's no rational reason work "fixing" what isn't broke.

Put Windows XP at the top of my personal list for "What isn't broken enough".    If Jack had listed "Windows", not "Windows XP", I'd be more willing to agree with him. The reason that XP is still around in force is that it took Microsoft to come up with a viable alternative, but one which REQUIRES 10X the hardware, and still isn't secure.  

Yes, if you can't resist opening emails from people you don't know, have to download every new free mallet that offers a new and exciting worthless and unnecessary functionality,  need to carry a "smartphone", "x-pad" or phablet so you can work 24x7 for 8x5 wages,or just don't know what to do with excess earnings (hint- try saving/investing  for a 40 year retirement) then you can plan to be like Alice in Wonderland - running faster and faster after "upgrades" that are as insecure and unreliable as what they claim to replace.

If you can devote a few hours to mastering a personal firewall, obtaining a pop3 email client that supports filtering rules, and can live with a basic web browser, a decent open office suite, and a very few open applications, there's no reason to abandon XP or Windows 2003.  If you need more capability, there's a wide spectrum of stable Linux releases that will run fine of the same hardware.  Rather than making an open-ended investment in applications which require Windows and an escalating amount of hardware resources,, make a lesser investment in alternative applications which don't.

Some of doesn't-know Jack's other nominations are more valid, though his rationale isn't.  The costs involved in replacing a pager system with celphones is open-ended, and unless implemented with a business-provided system and equipment, highly susceptible to abuse, malware, theft and intrusion. "Smart"phones  may be a replacement for some laptops, but not pagers. 

The only reason to give up pagers for celphones is if there is a business need.   I'd argue that if a business requires 2 way communication, employees should not be required nor allowed to use personal devices or services for that purpose. The business should provide a business-only celphone, and pay for its usage.

Pagers are ideal for local temporary paging, such as in a hospital, and unless a carrier must be involved to extend the service area, the only cost is maintenance and repair. If a paging system has to be replace with a phone system, it should be with basic celphone instruments, which are capable of SMS messaging, not with "smart"phones.  

If Jack and his ilk would promote learning how to effectively USE and APPLY techology, I'd be more open to his arguments.

PS  a typewriter repairman can make $50K/year.



Saud Hassan Kazia
Saud Hassan Kazia

1. Windows XP Everyone should upgrade to Windows 7 and Microsoft should rethink strategy to allow users with non-touch screens to opt for windows 7 while give users choice with a touch friendly of windows 7 or windows 8.1 2. AOL One of the legitimate ones that needs to be either upgraded bought or disappear. Do people still use this. 3. Blackberry Blackberry is truly amazing for those that use it for enterprise email and the reduced telephony costs apologize for not having useful apps or games or most of the stuff android and ios have 4. Dot matrix printers many companies require this for printing multi-colored page copies so each hop of the work flow whether its for invoice, delivery order or purchase order has its control 5. Fax machines some companies in UAE refuse to use email and will only accept fax 6. Internet Explorer-only web sites Internet explorer is the king of browsers. no matter what anyone says Internet explorer only websites interact with the system so you can use devices connected to the system like scanners. active x is amazing in functionality that has no suitable alternative 7. Internet Explorer Still the best and most compatible browser in the enterprise 8. Pagers this can go except for doctors and those who need to be on call all the time 9. VHS this can go 10. DSL a lot of countries cannot afford the technology to go fiber so DSL is the cheapest and best alternative

mikef12
mikef12

Jack seems to be something of a dipsh*t.

keyboards
keyboards

Join the real world Jack....

XP is still a valid OS for the PC  It works, it's a HELLUVA lot easier to deal with than Win8, you could throw almost any piece of hardware on it without having to play 'catch the pickle' with special drivers, and it was stable.  But obviously that's not enough for M$ shareholders.

Dot Matrix printers?   SERIOUSLY?!?!  There are myriad companies out there that still require mutli-part forms to be printed rather than pumping more ink or plastic onto individual sheets.

DSL is still viable for those who CAN'T get cable (yes, there are still places that don't).

I'll agree with you completely (so you don''t go off whimpering somewhere from all the flaming you're getting here) on AOL & VHS.  As CSNY once sang "Shoulda been done long ago...."

Just because YOU don't want to use the rest of these doesn't make it incumbent on everyone else to give them up
........................for right now, let's leave them 'undead'......

j3hess
j3hess

What do you say to someone when it is obvious that zombies have been eating pieces of his brain? We so sorry for you, Jack!

gke565
gke565

IE unsafe?  Wow, you should do some research before making the same troll comments as a fanboy.  Chrome and FF had more CERT security alerts each in 2012 than almost all MS products combine.  Oh and MACs don't get viruses.  Chrome is not an Enterprise application by any valid definition, so it should be nailed to its cross.

peterharding
peterharding

Used to think you knew what you were talking about, Jack, but not too sure now! Get some real world experience in business and you might learn the facts about why people use these technologies and don't want to change at present.

TRgscratch
TRgscratch

Need to keep at least one dot matrix, continuous-form paper printer.   Can't print those long "Happy Halloween" banners on some little cut-sheet printer

unity100
unity100

XP has to go away ............ and WHY ? 

It is lightweight, it works well, does the job. 

Companies are going to move out of an os that just works and does the job, to something more demanding, resource hungry like windows 7 or hell, even worse windows 8 for ........ what reason exactly ?

Because microsoft havent been showing good quarterlies recently ?

who cares ?

Well, looking at how commonly used xp is, apparently noone. But random bloggers on internet.

Judging by your comment about fax machines being unnecessary, it is easy to tell that you dont have any real world experience in most of the stuff you talk about. 

A faxed document still has more legal weight in many of the world's prominent countries than an email or electronic document. You dont have the option of saying 'hey, my fax was hacked, someone imitated my signature and sent you the contract'. But you can, with email.

.............


Jack ... next time before writing incendiary pieces, please write on stuff you know jack about.

alexisgarcia72
alexisgarcia72

Matrix printer is still heavily used where multi part forms are required. Epson is the option 1.

Windows XP is still in use in most factories with PLC equipment. I see lot of access control systems in use with windows xp since 2002 without any single problem. Computers not connected to internet, old hardware, pretty reliable. They will not update this machines for sure.

I prefer Chrome but IE works well for me. I don't have any issues and if I found a compatibility issue, I turn on compatibility mode.

Fax is still in use for many bussiness out there. As an example: During a credit card clone problem, Bank of America first option to request documents is by fax, no email option available. (But I hate fax! I was unable to send a 2 page fax during 30 minutes). But is still necessary.

Cable and fiber is not an option in some many places. So DSL have sense. You can have a good 2,4,8 mb connection. If no DSL, you can only have dialup 56kb!

VHS can go now with so many digital recorders available.

Pagers are still in use in hospitals a lot.



SSGGeezer
SSGGeezer

@courtneytrautweiler Very true for those of us who live in rural areas. We didn't even have DSL available until about 10 years ago!  And I would love Gigabyte speeds, I can live with 12Mbps consistently. (for less than a monthly Cable or DTV TV only bill.l

This isn't Korea where High Speed Internet has been available for many years.

Trilln451
Trilln451

@Heie Actually the idea is, if XP is no longer supported, hackers will target it more because MS won't be issuing security patches anymore.  This is a valid argument, & I plan to be on my toes & ready with 3rd-party security software as best I can.  I personally have not had any problems with hardware not being supported, but I don't have any dot matrix printers, & the one serial peripheral I do have (my old Spaceball) has been taught to speak to a USB port.

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

@NickNielsen 
I was in an old store the other day, one of those preserve/restore deals...bare bulbs hanging from 12 foot ceilings, plank floors, ceiling fans...and a hundred year old IBM cash register, still working fine.

And somewhere out there, there will be a restored county courthouse, with worn marble floors, globe fixtures and a green screen crt on a friden terminal with huge coax couplings hanging off the back.

Next scenario will be the concrete plant office, with a low-band two-way radio, file cabinets galore, and a status system running on XP.
 Memories, memories...

ManoaHI
ManoaHI

@PhilippeV yes. Where I used to live, ADSL smoked cable. Cable was at a measly 20Mb and DSL was only at 50Mb at the time. Back then, I had 100 Mb 10 channel fibre. Then DSL came and passed fibre, just as you say. I switched during one of those special offers, it was cheaper, faster, . That is the problem with sweeping satements, there is always something somewhere that makes such a statement seem lame.

Sort of the same things regarding FAX. While I am a rather paper hater, not all forms of language are eaiser or faster than writing and FAXing. Examples are the Asian language, yes, I know that modern OSes handle Asian script, but have you ever had to go to an Asian country and how much a colleague writing out the directions to the hotel and/or office so that the taxi driver could take you where you needed to be? Would you be wiiling hand over your phone/tablet/laptop to the driver?


bobc4012
bobc4012

@tvmuzik Hey, I still use VHS for taping shows! Had a DVR on trial and the flipping thing kept hanging, pixils would freeze and everything else under the sun. Took it back to my cable provider and told them it was a piece of crap! I am not one who has to see what is inside the pores of actors on TV, just give me a good story context. 

whitewolf60
whitewolf60

@psengr_techrep My first PC came with XP (I was a late adopter...it is a SONY laptop manufactured in 2001 which still works like a charm today!), and my primary workhorse is a SONY R Series desktop with XP MCE 2005 purchased in 2004.

My plan for XP? Right before the end of support, I will do a clean install on each XP system I own, download all the latest desired updates, then clone the hard drives. The clones will be stored should I ever encounter the need to "re-install" (i.e., "re-clone" the stored drive). For systems which may come around after the end of support, I plan to download a library of updates from the Microsoft Update Catalog for later use. 

Just as an aside...the last couple of XP installs that I have done (in the last week or so) have given me HELL during the update process; issues that have never occurred before (in over 100 installs on various systems) and that were resolved with some effort. Has anyone else encountered this? Could it be that MS is trying to make us throw in the towel early?

I rarely have any malware issues, and don't expect the purveyors of malware to suddenly begin stepping up targeting of XP just because MS ends support. In fact, I believe that many who have no use for Microsoft probably have a soft-spot for good ol' XP. Hackers seem to revel in targeting the "latest-greatest".

Note that I currently have machines (virtual and physical) with XP, Vista, 7, and 8, as well as various Linux distributions installed, yet still prefer many aspects of XP.

Certainly, in the business arena, the end of support for XP will raise liability and compliance issues; my opinions above relate to my personal use of the OS. And yes, common sense goes a long way, plus I don't "twerp" or whatever they call those ridiculously short messages! : )

bmerc
bmerc

@gke565 

Measuring security by counting CERT advisories is completely meaningless, please don't resort to that tired old nonsense.

That said, it's pretty obvious that this article is clickbait, pure and simple. IE has made tremendous strides in terms of both security and standards compliance in recent years. 

trevora
trevora

@peterharding "Get some real world experience in business". Hah! Surely you jest.

"Journalists" - and I use that term very loosely - thrive on hype and F.U.D. It's their living. Our is supporting the real world of I.T.  Kind of like a marketing department - basically useless - but we put up with them anyway.

JJMach
JJMach

@TRgscratch 

You'd be suprised.  A functional dot-matrix printer is worth big bucks now, since there are still some ancient iron systems in the field that can only interface with something that primitive.  
They're usually '80's era control systems, like, say your local sewage-treatment plant.  The ancient iron still works (with a liberal application of spit, bailing-wire, and hope) and there is no budget to replace it.  If the printer konks out, then you can't have it spit out the report you need to send to the home office...government regulators, etc. so they're absolutely critical.

I know there are Parallel-Port to USB cables, but does anybody embed them with an emulator so you can take the old iron parallel port output and send it to a modern printer?

JJMach
JJMach

@alexisgarcia72 

Clarification: a lot of people refer to "multi-part forms" but I think what we're really getting at is: multiple-copy forms (carbon-copy, pressure sensitive, etc.), where you  need the dot matrix impact to transfer to the lower copies.  

Think back to the last time you went to rent a car or some such.  There is a triplicate form that they grind out on the dot-matrix printer, and then have you hand-write the rest.  They need the carbon copies of your hand-writing, so it just saves time and effort to have an impact printer type in the rest.

bobc4012
bobc4012

@tvmuzik Should added that I had a DVD/VHS recorder combo. The DVD recorder crapped out but the VHS recorder still works like a champ! It was great for a while as I could record 8 hours on each. 

SirWizard
SirWizard

Your comment about 80's era control systems that keep sewage treatment working is just the tip of the iceberg. Ancient control systems run buildings, air conditioning, lighting, bridges, tunnels, subways, harbors, and on and on. Many still run DOS because it's so reliable at doing a set of stupid tasks very effectively. A system doesn't need to deal with email, web glitter, or a GUI to reprogram a gigantic fan's PLC (programmable logic control) for the right speed to hold a tunnel's vehicle exhaust ration below a fixed point.