Software

10 things end users do that drive me crazy

Annoying users come with the support tech territory, but sometimes a little venting can help. See if these scenarios sound familiar.

As a member of a local consultancy firm, my primary jobs are remote support and backups. Because of this, I deal directly with our clients a lot. Although I am fond of many of those clients, most of them still display behaviors that drive me, as a consultant, crazy. And maybe it's the excessive rain and storms we've been having, but these behaviors have escalated lately. So I thought I would share some of these things with you to see whether you've run into them -- and whether you've encountered other behaviors you want to share with your fellow readers.

Please understand, I do this to lay down a bit of humor so we can all commiserate, cope, and (I hope) laugh at the follies we deal with day in and day out. I do not, in any way, mean to suggest that I think people are horrible or that I don't like to deal with them.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Take control of remote sessions

I do a lot of remote support. For that support, I use either LogMeIn or TeamViewer. Inevitably, I run into clients who constantly want to "show me" what's going on, take over the mouse to point out something different, or even use their machine for something else (like replying to an email that should be able to wait). Outside of annoying any support tech, this does one thing -- extends the length of time needed to do a job.

Sometimes, it seems clients don't realize that other clients are actually waiting for my help, so they think they can take up as much of my time as they want. But beyond taking up time, this type of behavior often can lead to an environment of mistrust, where techs feel the client does not trust their work. No one wants to work under these circumstances.

2: Give too much irrelevant information about an issue

What I really want to know is that you clicked on an attachment that was in an email. I don't care to know the email was originated by your grandmother on your father's side and the email had the most darling picture of kittens and puppies playing together in a field of daisies. I also don't care that you were sitting at your desk, having your usual lunch of yogurt and sliced apples dipped in caramel when everything started to go down the drain. Get to the point, give me the facts, and I will do my job to the best of my ability.

3: Blame the issue on something I (or another tech) did previously

Yes, I've worked on your machine before. No, what I did last time to help you remap your K drive had zero effect on the fact that now you can't get a network connection. Although they may be related, they are not directly cause and effect. Trust me on this. I'm not trying to pull a fast one on you, and I am 100 percent sure that the K drive issue is not related. But on the off chance that you simply will not believe me, I will do everything I can to show you the two are not related in any way. If you still don't believe me, I have a list of other consultants who will be happy to have your work -- until they're no longer happy to have your work.

4: Lie

This one should not need any explanation. But for those who have yet to experience the liar, let me set the stage. There are times when you log into a user's machine and discover that something obviously has been done -- a profile or program deleted -- that can be done only by an end user. When an end user has made such a mistake, he or she will sometimes try to deny doing anything to cause the problem. That's fine. But most support professionals can see through the thinly veiled lie. We know the truth... so it's okay to admit it.

5: Take control of conversations

When I'm trying to explain an issue to an end user, it really bugs me when that user takes over the conversation, preventing me from being able to effectively communicate either the problem or the solution. Generally, these people tend to have more to say on the issue than necessary and assume what they have to add to the situation is far more important than what they have to learn. If those end users would stop and listen for once, the reoccurring issue I am trying to help them with might not reoccur.

6: Ask the "quick question"

This one really bothers me. Without fail, a client will call me with a "quick question" that inevitably winds up being a 30-minute phone conversation. My time is valuable through the workday and those quick questions add up. Not only that, but many clients use the quick question to avoid having to pay for support on the real issue.

7: Chat while I'm concentrating

This goes along with dominating the conversation. Many users, while in the middle of a remote session, want to chat. Sometimes that's okay, as we are simply waiting for a download or waiting on the progress of a service or application. But when I'm elbows deep in the dirt and grit of trying to resolve a crucial issue, don't try to chat me up about the weather, the royal wedding, or the price of gas. Please let me resolve the issue at hand (especially one that requires my concentration) and then I will happily chat about whatever (so long as I don't have a pressing appointment after yours).

8: Insist what their "cousin" told them was true

I get it. Some companies enlist the help of "Cousin Joe," who happens to owe the secretary a favor and "knows a thing or two" about computers. Well, Cousin Joe didn't do you any favors when he caused even more problems doing what he did. Not that I am going to slam your cousin. But when I say that although Joe's intentions were good, what he did was counterproductive to solving the issue at hand, please don't insist that the cousin was in the right and that I am only trying to bilk you out of more money. Of course, if it ever comes to those kinds of words, you will most certainly be looking for a new support specialist.

9: Undo my work

Raise your hand if you're guilty of undoing all that work the support techs did the very second they left. I've seen this happen plenty of times. I've had clients actually confess to doing this. What those clients don't realize is that I will more than likely have to come back and redo what I did prior to this visit -- and I'll also have to fix problems they caused by undoing my work. Do us both a favor and don't undo my work. This is rarely going to be a smart choice, and the possibility that you'll be able to resolve the issues created by your tampering are nil.

10: Lack the necessary information

When end users call for help, 75 percent of the time they have all of the information necessary for a successful appointment. The other 25 percent? Not so much. In fact, a large portion of that 25 percent require nearly double the normal job time just for fact gathering. So... when you call, please make sure you have all the information needed to complete the appointment. Otherwise, you are wasting my time and running up your bill.

Other peeves?

Do these users sound like some of your clients? If not, you are one lucky consultant/support specialist. If these clients do sound familiar, you have my sympathy. What other user behaviors do you run into that annoy you or impede your work?

Additional reading

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

276 comments
tekitup
tekitup

Some clients/users think just because they hired you 3 or 5 years ago to install their network printer that entitles them to "free" support and unlimited phone calls/emails with the likes of "hey just a quick question, how do I migrate my 150 employees to Google Apps? could you walk me through over the phone"...

desert_dweller5
desert_dweller5

You'd think that a tech would be happy to bill for this kind of idiotic behavior. Sometimes it's all about the Benjamins. I'd hope for the 25% who aren't prepared. More money for me! You gotta put on your tutor hat with the illiterate ones. My pet peeves: Not enough Info.-just as a bad as too much information is not enough. Client: I dunno it's just broken! Me: What's broken? Client: {angry & annoyed] can you fix it or not? Me: How can I fix anything if neither of us know what's broken? Just do the voodoo that you do so well: I was working at an inbound call center and I had a client who told me and I QUOTE, "Just do whatever it is you do! Just work your magic and fix my phone!" --- I know I had a magic wand around here somewhere. :D being forced to conceal the truth: worked at a place where they told us explicitly not to recommend or even mention third party solutions. Me: But what about when that's their only option? Can I tell them to go do some internet research? Company: no. Me: so you're telling me to lie. Company: No, of course not. Me: but It's lying by omission. Not having the whole truth is just as detrimental as misinformation or outright lies. Company: It's bad for the company. Every time a tech recommends a third party solution, invariably they come back to us claiming that a tech told them to go to a third party and that the third party broke their device even worse and now we're in a lawsuit because we told them to go research it on the internet. Ever hear of the starfish story? I walked on the beach after a strong storm. The beach is littered with starfish. As I walk down the beach I spot this little girl throwing starfish back. Me: "Why are you throwing them back, little girl? most of them are going to die anyway. Out of the thousands on this beach you might save only one. Why waste your time?" Girl: "But to that one, it matters. Even if I save one, I save a thousand because that one will make a thousand babies and grand babies and great grand babies. He'll tell those babies all about how one day, while washed up on a beach gasping his last breath, because there was no water, he was picked up and put back in the water and he was saved. and how all of starfish kind owes its existence to me. That's why I'm throwing them back. So that I can matter." I hope you understand the analogy. it's frustrating when the only solution out there is "against the rules." it's like knowing about a treatment that will cure a life threatening illness but not being able to even talk about it because it's illegal and even mentioning it to patients will get you fired and your medical license pulled. "we COULD save you from this life threatening illness but we won't because the treatment is illegal." how does that make any sense?? Give me the treatment and to hell with the law! When an employer tells you to do something unethical, or illegal. Worked at a place that refurbished computers. Per Microsoft's rules, we were supposed to install the basic version of office in the computers. My boss told me to install the nicer version and just put the sticker on the side of the computer for the basic one. I explained that it was against the rules. The boss insisted that I do what he said. He claimed that if anyone were to find out he would be the only one to get in trouble. --right... because the cops don't care if you are an accomplice... Boss: "who's going to know about it?" Me:"I will." I'll know I did a dishonest thing." Needless to say I didn't stick around much longer. In case you were wondering, I never installed any version of Microsoft office on those computers. It's amazing to me how much dishonesty, and unethical, if not illegal, activity goes on in well known "respected" companies, that nobody ever hears about. The law, in the USA, incentivizes people to just keep their heads down and never to blow the whistle. if you have a whistleblower case all the expenses for the lawyer are on the employee and it's just easier to find a new job, plus after being a whistle blower you get a reputation that makes it very hard to get a job because employers will look at you like, can we trust this person with our secrets? or is he going to blow the whistle on us too? Nobody likes a snitch, even when that's the right thing to do. Any one else want to get up on the soap box? I'm done with it.

bobp
bobp

User calls me: " I am sometimes getting an error message." Me: "What did the error message say?" User: "I don't remember." Me: "Was there more than one type of error message?" User: "I don't remember." Me: "Well then what were the symptoms? How was the computer behaving different than normal / usual?" User: "Nothing I know of other than the error messages ..." Me: "Call me when the error message pops up again or, if it is inconvenient then, write down what it says and call me later."

m.fioramonti
m.fioramonti

Some year ago i received a phone call by a customer telling me "internet does not work" (meaning web surfing). I'm in panic and i go and check the web proxy but everything is fine. I call him back and ask for an explaination. He answered me he wanted to say "a user cannot access the internet". So i ask him for a phone number to contact the user directly. I call the user and the problem changes again to "i cannot surf on a specific site" Guess what? He mistyped the URL.

bobball1
bobball1

At one point in my career I thought the older the user the more ignorant, just because they did not grow up with compuers and when they started the typewriter was the way you did word processing (and I can say that because it is true for me). I no longer think that way. I work in an environment that hires summer college students. These students HAVE a Bachelors degree and are in law school. Many of them are just as ignorant about how to even add a printer to their computer as their older counterparts. Job security I guess.

bobball1
bobball1

This is a great thread and I am glad someone reminded us all that we are lucky to have a job right now, even helping very ignorant users. Probably many of us envisioned perhaps moving on to the back office, or doing security, or lan/wan support instead of user hand holding but someone's got to do it and apparently we are good at it because someone is paying us for it. I can't seem to escape it because it is what I do best and I treat my customers with respect and dignity....especially the clue-less ones. Kill them with kindness indeed. Believe me they are usually very embarrassed when I have to come over and find a file for them because they don't know how to do a simple search. It is fun to blow off steam and talk about users being rediculous but we've got to keep reminding ourselves we are lucky, in this economy right now to even have a job other than picking avacados.

DOSlover
DOSlover

But which button seems to be a much harder question. This probably falls into categories 4 & 10. I have seen some amazing system 'reconfiguration' allegedly by a single key push!?

Ninja1507
Ninja1507

1. Not too bad, but still annoying yes. 2. Thats no so bad, sometimes if they ramble Its annoying but most of the time its cool 3. This one really bugs me, probably the most of all. Especially when its 3 mixed with 8. 4. Annoying but happens. 5. Yeah annoying but I normally tune them out then lol. 6. Well I advertise questions as free so I can't complain. 7. Again I ignore them and do the "wait till they stop talking then say "Yeah"" 8. I just ignore that too. 9. I make more money that way. So their problem not mine. 10.Thats annoying to me but it happens

Too Old For IT
Too Old For IT

Seriously, even as in-house support, PUHLEEZE do not go on and on and on about how this is "business-critical" or "time-sensitive" (BINGO!!) or "due this morning" or "my manger is pacing in my office". From a tech support perspective, your business-side issues are irrelevant. Do, however remember that In need the service tag number so I can have information on your PC handy and find you on the network!! Oh yeah, and your actual PC problem!

TechRepFollower
TechRepFollower

Having been a Tech Support person myself I can identify with your pet peeves. However, I have been on the other side as well with a tech support guy who spoke to me like I was an idiot. He was in nappies (daipers) when I first got into PC's and was trying to tell me how spreadsheets work. Cut my teeth on VisiCalc and know more about Excel and everything in between than he ever will. The lesson - acknowledge those users who do actually know more than the average joe.

robertlbradley
robertlbradley

How about the user that insists on telling you what the solution to his problem is? He may not even know the basics of IT, but he is confident that he knows the fix. I find the best way to deal with this type is to ignore his demands, do what is necessary to resolve the issue, and then send him an email. Another problem is the user who has a supposed "emergency." He'll send multiple emails, make repeated telephone calls on the weekend, and do whatever else he can think of to get an immediate response. The best approach is not to reward him for his bad habits. Fix the problem according to its severity, but don't cancel your weekend at the beach for this annoying type of user.

dargoth11
dargoth11

1) Users not knowing the terminology - When I say type (blah) in the address bar...they almost always start typing in a search field! It took me 10 minutes to get an (elderly, but good) customer to type an address into his browser so he could download the remote control software. 2) Many people think that downloading and installing mean the same thing for some reason. Can you download this to my computer (while handing you a software CD)? 3) What web browser do you use? Possible user answers: Google; Bing; Yahoo; (fill in whatever kind of wack-o search engine you want...NEVER the name of a browser). Then you have to start asking in pictures- "When you go to the web, what kind of icon do you click?" "A big blue E?", "A semi-circular red fox?", etc. It can be painful, but I try to enlighten them as I go. Especially, because I'm probably going to be seeing them again, and after several (infinity, some) visits they learn how things work and my job isn't as difficult anymore. Which makes me extremely happy!

dgilluly
dgilluly

I find it annoying when people click on every link in every email and facebook message they receive. Sometimes a hacker can get a hold of your friends account and send viruses with it. I advise not clicking on anything you don't recognize especially from a link forwarding service like bit.ly or tinyurl.

jpb_budrakey
jpb_budrakey

I've been doing computers since 1980 (yeah, i'm that old :-) and have been on both sides of the desk. I have a very interesting (sad) experience just last Friday with a tech support from a major software company that illustrates the maxim "A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing." I was trying to install their photo management product on a computer which has an 80 GB drive that only has the OS and necessary programs and 4 TB of data storage on internal drives. I was unable to make their program cooperate with the one of the data data drives so I called tech support as this is often a quick way to solve problems like this. After taking control of my computer and going over all the initial settings and getting nowhere, I asked if we could escalate the issue; she would not agree to do that. After a while, she put me on hold. When she came back, I watched in amusement as she proceeded to attempt to copy 213 GB to my 80 GB C: drive. When the copy process quit (after the 80 gig drive was full - yes we waited while the copy was taking place). After waiting quite a while (the machine was idle because the C: drive was full) She said, lets do a backup of the catalog as it is. She was able to successfully save the backup to the data drive, but she was unable to open it and got the same error message that I had gotten which prompted my call in the first place. She said she would "do further research and get back to me." The case is still open. When I turned on the computer later, naturally it crashed. So tech support from a major company crashed my machine. I watched politely (admittledly with a smirk on my face and only a wee bit of annoyance) while tech support crashed my machine. I did try to warn her that what she was doing wouldn't help but she forged on anyway. The only reason I let her crash my machine was the I knew that I could boot from a rescue cd and delete the offending files (that took me < 15 minutes) and I wanted to see how much touble the tech support person could get herself into (because she obviously wanted to do it herself, she refused to escalate). In the years when I was doing tech support, I would at least try to listen to my clients and if they showed a modicum of technical knowledge, I would try to enlist their help. On several occasions they (my clients) had more technical knowledge than I did but had overlooked some small detail in our software. Occasionally, we troubleshot some difficult cases together. So, what should I have done? Taken control of my computer and cut her off? Try to talk her out of it (I did tell her that what she was attempting to do would not help)? Ain't tech support fun?

alindsay
alindsay

Taking control of a technical problem is the job of the tech. Triage is can cut through some of the things mentioned. Educated end users will always be easier to help and sometimes it is important to let the user get it all out before you start to analyze the problem. If the professional computer person is impatient with the user it usually escalates the issue. Being a good tech is more than simply solving machine problems.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

after cleaning out the mess created by "Cousin Joe", getting the "it's not working again" call only to find that "Cousin Joe" put back the mess you just cleaned out. (one customer made the call-back in 20 minutes, after I did 3 hours of disaster recovery) I told her to call Joe, since she seemed to think he was smarter than I was.

roberts.christinel
roberts.christinel

from female users because I'm a girl. So many times I've been told "but my husband/boyfriend/father/brother said to do it this way" Yes, I'm sure his years of experience behind the counter at McDonalds has made him so much more knowledgable than me but please stop messing with the MY machines. Everytime their guy touches the computer or tells them "how it's really done" something goes wrong but they just don't see the correlation. My second pet peeve would definately be the clicking on anything and everything multiple times. Oh! and "but I read somewhere that It's supposed to be this way" Okay then, you don't really need me. You have Wikapedia. I hope you two are very happy together.

Robiisan
Robiisan

While it is not necessarily my top peeve, it's close. As an independent IT tech, I always try to be fair and honest with my clients. I am willing to tell them, if necessary, that they might be better off financially if they allow me to save their data to an external drive and replace their 12-year-old, hand-me-down-from-their-business computer that is still running Win Me, rather than have me spend hours kluging the thing back together so it takes less than a half hour to boot. In a recent case, I told the client (with an eight-year-old machine running XP on limited, but maxed out, memory) that the diagnostics I had to run were going to take X number of hours (between installation and running) and at Y dollars per hour, her cost was going to be $Z. I also pointed out that a new machine, running Win 7, including my time to re-install all her applications, restore her data, install anti-malware (AM) programs to prevent a recurrence of the problem she was experiencing, and train her on how to use them, would cost her considerably less and eliminate, just by the nature of the new OS and AM programs, many of the "challenges" she frequently encountered. Her response? You guessed it - she "fired" me by hiring someone else (who charges twice what I do) to take over, without giving me a chance to even finish the job. So I guess, to label the peeve, it would have to be "Fix it, but DON'T CHANGE ANYTHING!"

bobp
bobp

Yesterday I had to run an antivirus boot CD to clean up a machine. It takes a while so I left and asked the account / sole proprietor to call me when it was done. He called a while later and said it was stuck in the same place for an hour. I drove to his office to find that the program had found a piece of malware and was asking what to do - with the correct choice being to disinfect and delete if disinfection didn't work (check boxes). All this accountant had to do is read to me over the phone what the message was on the screen and I could have told him immediately what to do! Aren't accountants supposed to be able to read? Scary.

bobp
bobp

I kept getting support calls from an auto repair business that was shared by a mechanic and an auto body shop. They were two separate businesses sharing the same facility with different computers. I first cleaned up the mechanic's computer two different times and, the second time added a comprehensive app (either Advanced System Care or Glary Utilities, I forget). He used it faithfully along with other security software and had very few problems after that. The auto body guy would let his niece come in on Saturday morning and go all over the internet to who knows where, constantly reinfecting his business computer. Both I and the mechanic told him she was the problem, but he wouldn't listen. The mechanic used to joke with me that he was my bread and butter - regular work. I called them recently. The auto body guy said the computer was fine. I called back later trying to find the mechanic who had moved, and got the secretary for the auto body shop. She said the computer wouldn't even turn on. I told her it was probably just a bad power supply and easy to fix. The owner had apparently given up using the computer instead of keeping his niece off of it.

maxxx13
maxxx13

I agree with all of the posted troubles, and yes it seems like people should carefully read the FAQ's and posts before they call tech support. However, people know that they can get answers quicker by asking a question directly than by spending the time reading FAQ's, and they usually don't have corporate goals to maximize the reading of FAQ's. Reality is that people adapt. Now consider the "null hypothesis." If people did carefully read the instructions, achieve baseline competencies with basic software tools, didn't mess up their machines with iTunes...things would run like a Swiss watch. Where I work, that would translate immediately to elimination of support positions (that in time lead to programming or system admin positions). I think there's a golden realization at some point. I used to think I was hired to solve technology issues, which meant the users were in the way. Reality is that I am here to enable the user to do work. I have to treat the whole patient and the user and the PC and the network are all part of one system, That makes me one part technician and one part technology counselor. So, besides being frustrated and venting about these issues, do you have the fortitude to be a positive influence?

HomePageOnline
HomePageOnline

9 times out of 10 the customer will NOT read the error message on the screen. Tech: What did it say?? Client: Oh... uh... I don't know, I just clicked on OK Great!! Too bad my crystal ball is broken.

AllenT_z
AllenT_z

Way too many businesses have the practice of shutting both the end users and the programmers writing (or repairing) a system. Each has to go up three or four steps up and back down the organization chart to express their needs and the proposed fixes; the last couple of steps are usually people who have not a clue about anything that has been passed on to them, but they make the decisions that result in the final product. Then the troubles (and calls) start. There is an easy solution, but it requires that management surrender some of their presumed knowledge of everything everywhere: LET THE PROGRAMMERS AND USERS TALK TO EACH OTHER. Yes, I'm screaming. Allen

bw1234
bw1234

How about a list of things that IT support pros do that annoy end users? My biggest pet peeve is that they don't follow up. I've had many who insist that they simply did not feel it necessary to communicate until they had a solution. That is certainly never true. It is important to call or e-mail a client, even if you don't yet have the solution, just to say 'hey, I'm still working on it, here is a new ETA', etc. It provides the end user confidence that you haven't forgotten about them. Plus, it's basic common courtesy. You'd be surprised how many support people feel that is a waste of time. Or perhaps you wouldn't be surprised.

eileen4571
eileen4571

Being a helpdesk specialist for 12 years...I could have written this article myself. So right on!

tdrane
tdrane

After reading all these comments, as more of an end user then a tech, I have to just say that I take any issues with the network here the same as ordering dinner out...... I dont screw with the cook or the waiter, and I dont screw with the techie...... I may make a funny quip at the Star Trek shirt, but I'm not snide either.

DrEonn
DrEonn

Most of the time I put on my tickets EEUC. This is the biggest problem. They come in and tell me that they hate computes. Computers are stupid. When in reality it is code EEUC. EEUC = Equipment Exceeds Users Capabilities

viking1442
viking1442

#1 Annoyance! People that ask you for your expert help. When you give them the answer they may not want to hear they say no that's not the probelm

scratch4653
scratch4653

People don't (or can't) read! We've got online documentation, processes and portals tweaked to the nth degree to make them user friendly and easy to use. Very frequenly they call for a "quick question". If they had read the content carefully they would have thier answer!!

CLageweg
CLageweg

I think Jack is in the wrong profession.

digital riverrat
digital riverrat

These and others are why at a few places I used to work in the 90's, we used to call them lusers, instead of users.

mmmmpsi
mmmmpsi

REALLY? Do you need a toolbar for every web site you go to? Ask.com, Coupons, Smilely's, Google, Yahoo, BINg.. SERIOUSLY??? ALL need to DIE!!

MaSysAdmin
MaSysAdmin

I've only had this one come up a handful of times in 10 years. "We made X for company B to use but company C is now hosting it on their network for companies D, E but company F cant get access to it. Could you call company B and find out why?"

dan.wildcat
dan.wildcat

I've run into every one of those and, I'm sure, more. My number one peeve? Being blamed for what every other tech or computer company has ever done to any computer any where. I think I have at least one customer a week who wants to (or certainly appears to) blame me for whatever they did to their computer or for whatever minor failure of Microsoft to read their mind on what they wanted to do but failed in doing. Seriously, though, we fix the problem and help them to see the error of their ways. Then we gripe for moment in the back room, turn it into a joke, laugh for an hour, and get on with our lives. I still enjoy what I do anyways. The opportunity to help a person move on with their lives and solve a perplexing problem is worth more than the paycheck. And please, Cousin Joe, stop working on my client's computers!

JadedKnight656
JadedKnight656

I saw many people saying "You're a rude person who doesn't appreciate your customers!" At the very beginning this person points out, specifically, that this is more of a satirical article than a serious and honest examination of the people he deals with. Some people need to take their own advice and learn to read, or at the very least, interpret. ~Justin

jhoughton
jhoughton

what about working on a laptop or desktop keyboard, where you can tell that the EU has been picking their nose over the keyboard, spitting their bitten finger nails over the keyboard, never washing their hands and touching the keyboard, eating over it.. I have seen some laptop keyboards where even the clorox wipes cant get the built up grime off them, and then the desktop keyboards that you hold upside down, only to see all the gross crap falling out... ugh, makes me puke....

Prophocies
Prophocies

10 browser toolbars........speaks for itself.

jhoughton
jhoughton

I had someone drop off their laptop, later that day they came back to check the progress, and somewhere in the middle of the conversations they asked: When did I buy this laptop? I replied, I really dont know, but can you tell me when I bought my car? that honestly happened! unreal.

MiddleTommy
MiddleTommy

It is really annoying when you have to run through the script given to the support guy at you ISP. "Did you reboot your computer?" YES "What operaring system are you using?" Windows/Linux/Mac It shouldnt matter. "Does our internet software on your computer ...?" Why would I ever install your software on my computer to get the internet working. next question please. and so on.. I am going to escalate your situation to our next level support they will call your ... Once after a call like this while I insisted my internet was dial up slow and they needed to fix it I realized I turned on Antivirus Scanning and Website Filtering on the router last week. Turned that off and My internet went back to full speed. Oopps I guess it wasnt there fault after all. Another time a software upgrade didnt tranfer the network path settings to the new version. I was chewed out by the software company owner to always map a network drive to make finding the data easier for them. I didnt remember where I set up the data path two years ago. There sofware kept saying we had corrupt data. I was busy and didnt have time to investigate so my secretary called Tech Support. I dont like mapped drives because then users click on them and see what files they contain. When you are the Techie asking for support it can get embarassing

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You have no choice but to refer to them as the "Helpless Desk"...

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

like that somewhere here. I remember reading it before. Try searching for it.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

Two actually. One from The Original Series, and one from Voyager. I have most of the DVDs as well.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

Two actually. One from The Original Series, and one from Voyager. I have most of the DVDs as well.

bobpeg
bobpeg

At least Cousin Joe guarantees you will have steady work with this client .... :-) (Although it can get frustrating to fix similar problems over and over.)

roberts.christinel
roberts.christinel

One office I worked in there were at least three women who had makeup all over their keyboard and phones all the time. It literally made me gag when I tried to work on their machines.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I have all of the DVD's from The Original Series, Next Generation, Voyager, DS9 and all of the movies but I simply refuse the Enterprise Series it was complete rubbish. ;) Col

pgit
pgit

The wife and I are going through Enterprise atm, we cycle through all the series slowly, here and there, starting over again when complete. Enterprise is actually the first in the series as we go through these in chronological order. We're really enjoying this. Some of the actors are damn good, the Vulcan first officer gets my vote for one of the top 5 characters in all of the star trek franchise. Certainly wouldn't call it rubbish, in fact I rate Enterprise way better than Next Generation, which was a disco soap opera, in my esteem.

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