Software

10 things that will annoy the hell out of your Web site visitors

It's easy to get caught up in the implementation details of a Web site design project and lose sight of the hands-on user perspective. Calvin Sun airs a few user experience grievances that can alienate site visitors -- permanently.
A hard-to-use Web site can be just as deadly to a business as a rude front-line service person. Once a visitor leaves in disgust, getting that person back can be next to impossible. Here are some potential irritants to watch for. Note that in many cases, the issue can be avoided without having to do special coding. Simple changes in text/instructions to the visitor alone are often sufficient.

1: Nonexistent instructions regarding case sensitivity

Tell the visitor explicitly if input must be case sensitive. Having to press that [Shift] key with your left pinky finger may not be a big deal, but it's an effort nonetheless. Such instructions are particularly important if you require any kind of CAPTCHA input.

2: Having to guess at formatting of dates, phone numbers, or social security numbers

Be sensitive to input that is associated with special formatting, such as dashes in Social Security numbers or telephone numbers or dashes or slashes in dates. Tell the visitor whether the special characters must be provided -- or must not be provided. Nothing is more annoying than entering a date with the slashes, only to find that you've run out of space. Equally annoying is when you enter the data without those characters, only to be told that they are required. The best option is to preformat the form. If doing so requires too much development, at least tell the visitor, via instructional text, the required format for the entry.

3: Transaction "false positives"

In medicine, a "false positive" refers to a test that says the patient is ill when the patient really is fine. In the world of Web pages, I use "false positive" to refer to a situation where a visitor thinks a transaction is complete, but it really isn't.

A few months ago, my daughter called and said, "Daddy, where is the money that was to be transferred to my account?" I told her I was certain I had performed the transfer and that I recalled clicking on the bank Web site's Submit button, but that I would go back and check.

Yes, you guessed it: When I did a test transfer, and arrived at the place where I previously clicked Submit, the Web page did not execute the transfer. All it did was take me to a subsequent page that asked me if I REALLY wanted to do the transfer. In other words, I erroneously thought that by clicking Submit, I had made the transfer.

Be careful about how you label the action buttons. Specifically, be aware that labels such as Submit might lead visitors to think that clicking on the associated button will perform a transaction. If it doesn't, they will be upset later to find out they were wrong.

4: Transaction "false negatives"

Watch out for false negatives as well. You don't want visitors to click a button, thinking they will not execute a transaction as a result, only to find that they really DID execute that transaction.

Continental Airlines uses a screen that has a button labeled Continue to Purchase. The first time I saw it, I thought that clicking it would take me to a screen that would show a summary of my proposed purchase and ask me if I really wanted to make the purchase. However, when I clicked that  button, the Web page actually purchased my ticket and charged my credit card.

A better label would have been simply Purchase, along with a text that said Clicking will purchase the ticket and will charge your credit card.

Avoid similar misleading labels on your own Web sites.

5: Misleading "Contact Us"

I wish I had a dollar for every time I clicked on a Contact Us link, only to see an email form pop up. When I click on such a link, I am looking for multiple ways to contact the organization, and email is only one of those ways. If you have such a link, make the result more than an email form. Take them to a page that shows physical address, phone number, and fax number.

Providing a link to an email form is fine, but label it appropriately as Email Us, not Contact Us.

6: Disabled backward navigation

He may ride forever 'neath the streets of Boston,

He's the man who never returned.

The song "MTA" tells the story of Charley, a man who gets onto a Boston subway. However, because he has too little money, he can't get off, and he rides forever on that subway.

Your visitors will feel like Charley if the Back button is disabled once they enter your site. They will be annoyed at having to remember and retype the address of their previous site. If you do really want to disable the Back button, make sure you have a good reason for doing so.

7: Blanking out an entire data entry form due to one small error

In Greek mythology, King Sisyphus was ordered by the gods to push a huge boulder to the top of a hill. However, every time he almost reached the top, the boulder would slip from his hands and roll all the way to the bottom. For all eternity, Sisyphus would have to push that boulder.

If you have lengthy data input forms, how does your system handle errors in one or more fields? If it blanks out every field on that form, your visitors will feel like Sisyphus, and they'll justifiably feel angry. When an input error occurs, try to save as much of the other valid input as you can.

8: Incompatibility with non-computer devices

Your Web pages possibly may be accessed by smartphones as well as computers, so make sure your pages can still be used by them. In particular, if you use drop-down lists, be sure that every item on that list can be chosen via the phone. For example, I no longer use infospace.com on my iPhone because I can select only states from Alabama to Kansas.

9: Primrose path links

The Web site avvo.com provides for reviews and rankings of physicians and attorneys. In particular, it allows attorneys to endorse other attorneys. One day, I was looking at my own profile and saw the Endorse this Attorney link next to my photo. Of course I clicked it. But when I did, I got a screen that said You cannot endorse yourself.

Such a link is what I call a "primrose path" link, because it leads nowhere. Rather than have such links, consider having logic that instead grays out or otherwise disables the link, depending on the context.

10: Failure to provide default responses

The 80-20 rule states that large effects can be the result of small things. For example, 80% of complaints come from 20% of your end users; 80% of your visitors visit 20% of your Web site; 80% of the time a given field will have only 20% of available options entered.

This last example illustrates the benefit of using default entries when appropriate. For example, if most bank transfer requests are "immediate" requests rather than "future scheduled" requests, consider defaulting the field accordingly. Your visitors will appreciate this feature. Of course, every Web page and every industry will have a different situation, so you will want to analyze your Web page data before making a decision in this regard.

Additional Web design resources

Got a beef?

What frustrations and annoyances have you encountered on ill-conceived or poorly implemented Web sites? Are there certain popular interactive features or design elements that drive you crazy?

About

Calvin Sun is an attorney who writes about technology and legal issues for TechRepublic.

195 comments
jcvillarreal
jcvillarreal

This has happened to me in many websites, some do not say they are meant only for US customers, others are clearly meant for an international audience. A phone number is required, but there is a strict formatting rule that will only allow US numbers. Also, you need several iterations to find out the rules. You first use the standard international format with a '+' at the beginning, and find out that the plus sign is not allowed. Then, you find out that only 10-digit numbers will fit. Once you fill in a nonsensical number with 10 digits in it, and select your country name from a drop-down list, you still have your application rejected because you did not fill in a 5-digit zip code. In my country zip codes were not used until recently, but now they are 6-digit numbers.

slylabs13
slylabs13

Ever been provided with a popup list of issues at a tech support site, only none of the choices apply to your situation? Or how about a Type of Business popup which does not list non-profit? Hey we are a Church! We are in the business of saving souls, but that isn't one of the choices dammit! (Whoops lost control there sorry.) Typically, there should be an "Other..." choice and an optional field where you can type in your issue or choice. When there is not, I pick the worst possible choice and then blast the web dev in the comments section for not considering that he cannot possibly anticipate every issue or choice that might arise.

mwclarke1
mwclarke1

Blanking out an entire data entry form due to one small error Bugs the hell out of me, Many times not using and never going back to that site if an alternative exists. Disabled backward navigation Sometimes just as bad, but not too bad as long as I am made aware of this, maybe can not be helped to to data propagation in forms, etc but would really be less painful if could use the back button. Also what really annoys me the most of all..... Not following W3C published web development and coding standards, maybe would not have as many browser interoperability issues. The over use of flash, java scripting, frames and tables. Use of so much causing web sites to feel like the days of dial-up again. Trash the .net, learn to do real web development!

Woodesigner
Woodesigner

What I find convenient is a commerce web site that pre-formats the four digit spaces for a credit card number. It is a faster entry format and it makes it MUCH easier to check that you actually typed in all the numbers correctly. Looking at four groups of four is a lot faster and more accurate than looking at sixteen digits smashed next to each other.

dhays
dhays

I also scramble for the mute button on an automatic video. Unfortunately I go to the site for a purpose and don't want to stop, so the scramble for a stop or mute button is necessary. Way back when, I used to do an intranet page for my division, I added music (of my choice, of course) to every page. Nowadays, I agree, music/video automatic start should be off limits. If I want to see your video, I can start it on purpose, just don't start it on accessing your page.

seanferd
seanferd

I'll click "Submit" now, and it won't look like anything happened. edit: I was going to edit the wonky thing TR did with the quotes, but never mind. Deeply baffling is the use (somehow) of a-circumflex for quotation marks.

seanferd
seanferd

I'll click "Submit" now, and it won't look like anything happened.

Suresh Mukhi
Suresh Mukhi

Like in THIS site, I want to view messages sorted by date and time. Instead, it puts replies right under the post they were replying to. How am I supposed to find all new replies when they are scattered all over the place?

ToreTheHound
ToreTheHound

I really hate netshops that require me to enter name, billing info incl credit card info etc, BEFORE they tell me the total cost. Typical american attitude. European a bit better ;-)

steve
steve

I have been using a .info email domain for years now, but a surprising number of sites insist that it is invalid. Particularly annoying is a mailing list that I subscribed to but cannot now unsubscribe from as the email address that they are sending to is considered invalid. With the new roll-your-own domain names now coming, the only valid check will be a DNS lookup.

Leafgreen
Leafgreen

Many users have email addresses that often go into spam filters. Using a form ensures that the email will go into the inbox of the website's intended email account. And no, not all the time does the website's email account owner read their spam folder, or have a spam filter that works.

AllenT_z
AllenT_z

I don't remember his name, but the person who wrote the "10 Things" that users do to the poor little professionals that are paid to help them should memorize this and be required to pass a test on it before being allowed to post anything else. Mr. Sun understands the function who are paid to serve their users--not the other way around. One of the best "10 whatever" that you have run. Allen

hughw44
hughw44

I'm surprised this one didn't make the list, but maybe it's just me. If you want me to not use your site, just make it hard for me to log in, and then make it hard for me to reset my password. I think some good practices are: 1. Don't limit what a user can put as a password. That is, don't tell them they can't use the "&" key or anything like that. Minimum/maximum number of characters is fine, but let the user put anything they want for a password, including spaces. If a password like "" lets the user attack your website, that's your problem, not theirs. 2. Don't give the user weird "security questions" like "what was the car you drove in your sophomore year in college?" And, don't make the answers case sensitive. If the name of the pond where they caught the frog in the third grade was named "Walden", don't throw the user under the bus if they type "walden". 3. Allow either a username or an email. That way, if the user doesn't remember their username, they can login with their email. By the way, I give this site a "+" for this one. And another "+" for the fact that I log in here about twice a year, and still haven't had to tell you the name of my deceased second cousin's funeral parlor.

geofstaniford
geofstaniford

The internet and the Web are truly international and I buy quite a lot of goods from US sites. I could cry into my beer when, after filling in large chunks of info I'm presented with something like a ZIP code (for example) is required. No one outside of the US has ZIP codes so the whole thing fails. Please US web designers tell us if your site is country specific before we start to enter into transactions. There may be 300 million of you, but there are over 4 billion of us.

jamiefixit
jamiefixit

Ok you go to click the continue button and as you try... it jumps down the page because the ad banner just loaded in the place where the button was so you click the ad by mistake and then have to go to the headquarters of the company involved and burn it to the ground in a purple faced rage. Or more likely you just tolerate it and hate them just that little bit more. Nat West do this with their online banking site on the 'we're just double checking some of your contacts details (for important security reasons of course!), like your phone number, is it accurate, click on the continue button to say that it is! but oops we just moved it because actually we're just using it as an excuse to show you an advert for something else you don't want and never will' page. Oh and you clicked on the ad because the slow old banner didn't draw fast enough, silly you. Number 7 also causes me to cry regularly.

jmcgachey
jmcgachey

Making the sides of the page FREAKIN' HYPERLINKS! Annoying beyond belief...

mattohare
mattohare

Some developers think they can do a good site by customising a CMS. Just make sure you have some oridnary users try it out. The people at www.translink.co.uk made a big mistake with this in a way that made it much harder to find their timetables and news items. Much of the site didn't even work when it went live. Sure the old site was buggy, but we could find things.

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

1. Pop-Ups, Pop-Unders, and Pop-overs. These ad delivery methods are so notorious that a valid website attempting to deliver honest content (admittedly very few now days, if any still try.) 2. Ad-Hijacking - Delivery of content of the page visited, until the last second, when an ad takes over the whole page for you to click on (skip, or "goto") or wait for a specified time to expire. 3. Websites who refuse to recognize the top-5 browsers, let alone the host of smaller browsers that exist. For that matter, ones that complain when say you have FF4, and it was designed with FF3 in mind, and it complains because it ISN'T the lesser version. 4. Web Developers who will cut and paste their code straight from word into a page, creating messed up punctuation, in particular, quotes (single and double.) 5. Websites that promise this or that for free, and a couple of links later, want to know you personally, your latest stool sample, your cell-phone (so they can initiate a subscription on your phone line,) your first born, etc. just to see it or download it. Don't promise me free, and force me through a gamut of "opt-in" promotions/advertisements or then want my entire life history. 7. Badly designed Flash, or a site all in flash. It's an insult to those with disabilities, or those who prefer something easier to access. (Not to mention Flash is VERY SEO unfriendly.) 8. Farming sites by keyword spammers, who's only goals are to push pr0n or worse, some form of malware, (worst case) or to just develop page hits at any cost, even with unrelated garbage. (A few still get through the SEO process and rank too high.) When I develop, I try to avoid all that garbage.

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

Sorry if this is a little off topic, but another pet peeve of mine is people who post to discussions something like "hey, go check out my new foo bar..." but they give you no link or any other contextual information on go there and check it out. Thunderbird has a cool feature that if you type the work "attach" or something similar in an e-mail, and you have not attached anything it will nag you to do so. It would be nice if web sites that host discussions had something similar where if someone says something like "check out" "go see" etc. it would nag them to put in an actual reference if none was found.

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

In January 2010 my e-mail provider informed me they could not longer support me. This was a legacy e-mail address I had used for over 20 years and I had used it for the credentials of many web sites. While my service provider gave me a year before they canceled my e-mail address, I found I actually needed that long to convert all my accounts. There are a truly amazing number of web sites that use your e-mail address as your login. This is all fine and convenient until you need to change it, and the web site has no way to change it. I really got tired of calling customer support and hearing: you will have to cancel your account and create a new one (and lose all the legacy data associated with your first account).

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

There are not a lot, but I have run into a few web applications that require credentials. However, rather than let you choose your own account name and/or password, they assign one to you. This is particularly frustrating when they give you no way to change your password so now you are forced to write it down somewhere. For example, where I work we can get an electronic copy of our payroll statements. However, the system assigns you a specific login ID. I'm sorry, I just refuse to comply with such a stupid system design, and I'm just going to have to be a little less green and get all my payroll statements printed and mailed to me.

j.ringham
j.ringham

I got really ticked this week trying to resolve an issue with Barnes & Noble on purchases for my Nook. I have been using the same card forever, suddenly it was declined. Called the bank, they are blocking transactions from New Jersey and Florida due to excessive fraud in those states (BN is in New Jersey). Bank web site never notified anyone of this. Would think you could get an email from them or a banner somewhere on the site saying "for yhour protection.....". Trying to contact Barnes & Noble to use another card, and you can only call them for issues like this. First you have to listen to a minutes worth of advertising, then you get all the options to chose from, then they want to to enter your order number (about 12 digits +# key). All I wanted to do was either have the option to change to a different card number right on line, or talk to a real person where I could resolve all three orders at the same time and not have to type in all this stuff on the phone. Both web sites were lacking in this situation. Oh, and the nasty gram I got from Barnes and Noble totally froze my ability to purchase anything from them, and said that if I didn't respond in 6 days, they didn't want my business. Can't return the Nook at this point, but I can buy ebooks elsewhere, and will.

mark16_15
mark16_15

I'm an American living in Germany. When type in a .com domain address of a US website I don't want to be redirected to the German language website automatically. If I wanted German, I'd type .de. I've mentioned that to 100s of my German university students ant they, even as native German speakers prefer to be able to choose which version of the site the want to go to.

BS Analyst
BS Analyst

Went to a site the other day. Signed up and selected a password. Validation returns: "User name already in use". So I entered another, along with the password I selected because the form blew it out. Several more times it said: "User name already in use". Would be nice to offer open user names. After I picked a valid user name it errors out saying: "Passwords must be between 4 and 10 characters". AAAARRRRGHHHH!!!! If it can only be x length, needs uppercase, lowercase, symbols, Cyrillic and Hieroglyphic characters, then tell me before I enter the password 47 times!!

jspicker
jspicker

I completely agree with all of the items on this list but there is another I want to add. This is something I find very annoying about the TechRepublic site. When I want to scroll down, I need to click on some non-article space, such as the side margins, to trigger my arrow keys. When I do that on these TechRepublic articles, suddenly and most annoyingly a new browser window opens with some advertising (hp is the current one). At least it opens a new browser window and doesn't redirect the one I'm in but it is truly annoying and I don't see this on any other website.

DGermantr@Real-World-Systems.com
DGermantr@Real-World-Systems.com

Web pages with ad nausea entries of comments. ++ Like TR's comments ++ After a significant number of entries forums and opinion lists should have a way to categorize/summarize/sort the entries. Especially the "me-too" and "off topic" entries

arnoldlodge
arnoldlodge

Have to agree on the stealth advertising. On this very site for example, you are scrolling down reading the posts, then click in the black area to the left or right of the text area and it takes you to a HP web page. I don't want that. Also, on the "Contact Us" debate. I thought it was a legal requirement, if you are providing a paid for service, to include a postal address and telephone number. "Contact Us" should offer a number of ways to contact a company, not forcing people into entering details into an email form (and therefore probably having their details stored on a database).

david
david

I get really mad at a web page that has an ad at the top that pushes the page down. You start reading the page and the ad animation quits and then jerks the page up on you. You get furious when there are two of those damn things. Hold the page still!!! A N D----- as ISP's start putting caps on bandwidth, I get mad at all the wasted bandwidth on advertising. Take this very web story, about 8k of text. I would hate to know how much is on ads. So when my ISP tells me they are going to cap my internet, I am going to demand that it exclude ads since I did not request those ads to be rammed down my internet pipe.

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

It is truly amazing how many web sites 'require' information the user has no possible way of knowing (without protracted research), especially when the information is really not essential.

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

It really pisses me off how many sites are designed only for U.S. readers, because the site designers have no knowledge of anything outside the boundaries of the United States. For example: don't ask for an address and country, and fail to accept the data because the user does not have a valid U.S. zip code.

daviddag
daviddag

1. Having the option already ticked to remember login details. I never store my details as it is a security risk. 2. Websites that use too much data just to display a page. Not everyone has unlimited data bundles especially if using 3G. 3. Websites that don't get tested on all the major browsers. I often find that Firefox does not display the page correctly. I once came accross a site I could not view because XP service pack 2 was not installed.

jackson_robert54
jackson_robert54

I hate searching a subject and being presented an article or document with no date. Is this information current or stale? Fortunately you did date this article.

jackson_robert54
jackson_robert54

I hate dropdown lists that key on the first letter entered and then present the first qualifying entry at the BOTTOM of the list. Enter "C" for Canada and Cambodia appears at the bottom so you have to scroll down. Cambodia should be at the top of the lists with all the other "C" entries following.

spawnywhippet
spawnywhippet

1. Any kind of popups. Especially those like banking websites where the application tries to launch a maximised stripped out shell of a browser with no menu buttons. Don't these idiots realise that most browsers block popups by default? 2. Pointless Flash intros as a homepage, which you have to click skip or wait for it to finish. 3. Any kind of noise. 4. Sites that insist you are in the USA (or any other country) and will only accept a USA formatted address, state, phone number, social security number etc. 5. Sites that do not recognise the +xx standard for international dialling phone numbers. I'm a very frequent traveller with phone numbers in half a dozen countries, and am amazed how often sites will not allow me to enter +44, +65 or +61 as a dialling prefix. 6. Companies that only accept USA issued credit cards. 7. Companies that only ship to the continental USA. 8. Adverts that cover some of the text you are trying to read, then have a fake close button that takes you to their page. Is there a better way to annoy your customer and ensure they don't trust your company? 9. Sites that have ads with pics of semi-naked people or online dating. This is borderline acceptable for social networking sites, but bang out of order for any kind of business. 10. Forms that 'forget' all your data after you click Submit, just because you used the wrong date format or incorrectly verified your password or the impossible-to-read captcha.

kgross
kgross

I hate when I'm trying to find something on a website using my smartphone and being stuck with the limited version of the site and not finding the link/option/information that I know the site provides on the full version, but with no option of switching to the full website version on the phone (which is more than capable of displaying a full version of the site).

jill.t.largent
jill.t.largent

I know I am not alone - my last name has an apostophie, and I know it's very easy to handle the input to your data field.... spend the time to handle the proper spelling of last names.

athineos59
athineos59

Unfortunately, they still exist! What if I do not have the highest resolution for some reason? When I see a site that will not fit on my screen and still be able to see the content it better be a darn good reason, otherwise I am gone and never come back...

jdunster
jdunster

The National Australia Bank opens up full screen when one logs in. It looks stupid 3 small lines in the centre of a 24" monitor. And if one is transferring the information that was needed that one had on the screen has been covered up. Easy you say click the maximize button and it will go back. No they use the drag type to get to full screen and to view anything else the window must be dragged back to a usable size. Their web people call it a better banking experience. I bet their management don't get it on internal usage.

trailbarge1
trailbarge1

I use the web at work to identify equipment or technologies that I need to get my job done (I'm a mechanical engineer). As a flip-side to the primrose path, I often want to ask a simple question, but the "more information" or "contact us" button or the link to a cut sheet will take me to an unreal contact form. Listen, princess... I don't want to fill out a resume and I don't want to expose myself to endless sales calls just to find out how much your stupid valve weighs. Get it? Got It? Good.

P.F. Bruns
P.F. Bruns

...you know, like the one TechRepublic pulls up if you don't have an account, or aren't logged in.

Tink!
Tink!

I hate it when Contact Us goes to a form ONLY (#5). I expect a phone number or an email address at least. Forms are just plain annoying. Also hate #7. Certain sites I use I've gotten into the habit of copying the text before I click submit just because I know they tend to have errors that will clear the whole form. Bleh!

wendygoerl
wendygoerl

I have two beefs: one is "contact us" (and by the way, I diagree about the "contact us": Although I accept a page that includes other modes of communication, I expect to at least have the email listed) where the page assumes you are using Outlook or some other mailservice that uses the "mailto" prefix. If, like me, you don't, you have to hang the cursor over the link, note the true link that shows up in the corner, change to your "compose" page, type as much as you can remember, go back to the contact page, repeat 2-10 times... And many internal email forms are even worse: you come to the contact page after you unsuccessfully tried to find the answer to your query in the FAQ pages, only to get routed to the SAME pages before the site'll open the contact window, and then ask you to "select from list" a subject which has noting to do with any of the options they give you. Also, it's faster and easier for me to type "WI" than "W," [arrow], [arrow], depending on whether the list is alphabatized by full name ("West Virginia" before "Wisconsin") or 2-letter postal abbreviations ("WI" before "WV"); or having to "select from list" your state from a window that opens with only A-N showing, or pops up half off-screen.

jakes_51
jakes_51

I'm a web designer myself. Everyone has viable points. There has been some insightful things with everyone's comments. Thank you, I will keep them in mind. Some of my latest peeves are the div layers that usually appear at top ( header ) or footers where there's just ads. Another one are the invisible ads that link to ad farm sites such as this page itself!! Go on.... put your mouse pointer over the black space of web page ( area past width of main content window). You'll see it's linked to adlog.com. Sometimes trying to scroll a page and you accidently click on this opens well who knows what. which is an annoyance. How about ads in streaming media. Commercials really, and will only get worse. Some sites specializing in watching video online also have a tendancy of using multiple players for the same video. hmmm which to choose. What makes it worse yet... you are forced to click on a player to remove the ad, and part of the content silently installs malware. This happend to me at a site I once trusted. For sites not compatible for mobile... there are plug-ins and etc. to make a mobile complatible website but require cms or some other string attached. But we have to remember that with each new device that comes out... we have to design something for that too. Technology is actually still in the process in development so we don't have to design for each device. One size does not fit all. Whether it's desktop, laptop, TV, mobile, iPad, tablets.. then on to browsers and so forth. As far as actual design goes.... while there are rules we must follow, and others are merely rules of thumb. Most of these mistakes forementioned are solely advocated by client or plain inexperienced designers. If you ask me, too many "script kiddes" or "designers" claim they know how to do something but don't know actual code. They just use a cms (content management system) to do the work for them (premade templates) and call themselves a designer. I would never ever use cms for my portfolio site. besides, they all pretty much look exactly alike.

sorgfelt
sorgfelt

On most sites, I enter my entire email address as the userid, then get an error, because I don't remember the password. When I click on the "Forgot your password?" link, I almost always have to retype my email address. It makes me very angry that programmers can't think to save the email address and populate it on the form to reset the password. And, BTW, if they actually send me my password (meaning they have it in plain text), rather than reset it, my initial reaction is to change the password to something very difficult and never use that site again.

mattohare
mattohare

I've seen some PHP sites that are worse than anything on ASP.NET. At least ASP has tools to keep people within bounds, if they chose to use them. PHP has very little support.

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

Could you give an example? I'm sort of unfocused this morning and can't imagine what you are talking about, even if it is clear to everyone else. Please, please, please!

premiertechnologist
premiertechnologist

Ah, the magic of blogs: In this Boomer world of 'have your say and go your way', there should be no expectation that anyone will actually read your posting, let alone respond to it in any logical manner and if you expect ACTION, forget it. It's all about the me, me, me: My opinions are all that count. Your opinion is no better than anyone else's. It's all about the freedom of self-expression. And so it is, you may have wonderful ideas. I like yours. I'll actually incorporate them as much as I can into my personal websites as I can, but I'm not selling anything but ideas (and maybe get some pennies from Amazon.com if you buy a displayed book or a book from linking to the book). No, when you post to any forum, even this one, expect any kind of off-the-wall response disconnected from any reality of having a relationship to what you posted, because as sure as death, hell, taxes, revenge and the fury of the woman scorned, it's all about selfish self expression of worthless opinions with complete disregard for anyone else. Thanks for your thoughts. Really? Because the XP service pack 2 was not installed?

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

for web creation, and find them a PAIN to use, especially if it's maintenance from some other person's site assembly. Perhaps it's lack of familiarity with the so-called software, but perhaps it does really tie my hands creatively. After all one can create their own template for content and place what they need to on each individual page. PHP and JSP both will allow includes, and most of the CMS templates/"software" take advantage of them. Put together right, the combined files WILL pass W3C validation, unlike some of the CMS based sites.

kolotyluk
kolotyluk

For example, say you are in a purchasing application and it asks for an account number. Now if all you do is purchasing all day long, then you probably know it by heart. But if you are a casual user of the purchasing system and it asks for an account number - how are you supposed to know such information? Consequently you are forced to start a research project on how to find account numbers in your organization. A good web app would either display a list of accounts, or have a hyperlink to a chart of accounts or a document on where to find accounts, or the e-mail address or phone number of someone who can help you. There are many variations on this basic theme.