Windows 8

10 things to love about Windows 8

After spending a couple of months kicking the tires on the Windows 8 Developer Preview, Justin James can cite a number of promising features and positive changes.

Now that the Windows 8 Developer Preview has been available for a while, it is easier to take a step back and evaluate it without the powerful emotions that strike most people the first time they deal with it. Looking at it from a long-distance perspective, there's a lot to like about Windows 8, especially if you are ready to cut the cord from an installed desktop application base and transition to Web applications and Windows 8 native applications. Here are 10 things I think are great about Windows 8.

1: It's designed for tablets and touch

Microsoft is working hard to make Windows 8 work well with tablets and the touch UI paradigm, to the point of alienating traditional desktop users. It remains to be seen how Microsoft will respond to criticism over the Metro UI. But I can tell you that after using a phone with the Metro UI for well over half a year now, I think it is extremely effective for touch, and I would love to have a tablet running Windows 8.

2: Apps "share" data

One of the big changes in the application development model is that native Windows 8 apps (those using the new Metro UI and WinRT API) really do not directly communicate with each other, even through the file system, except via carefully defined interfaces. While this handcuffs developers a bit, it means that when applications do share data, Windows is aware of how they do it and makes it easy. For example, you could have an application that handles images and use it to share the pictures with, say, an application to upload them to Facebook. That unleashes a lot more power for developers because it means that applications from different vendors will work together seamlessly, and the developers do not even have to write anything specific for the application theirs works with.

3: The apps can be integrated into the OS

Just as the applications can "share" with each other, they can do the same thing with Windows itself. Again, this allows some really neat integrations to be done without much work by application makers. You can see things like a new social networking application come out and within weeks, Windows will be able to use your friends who are on it in its contact list, or the pictures can go into your picture gallery. The possibilities are endless.

4: It offers ARM support

While the ARM CPUs may not be for everyone or every purpose, lots of mobile vendors have a deep commitment to that platform and understand it well. The ARM devices will not be able to run legacy Windows applications, but they will run the Windows 8 native apps without a hitch. That's great news for hardware makers, software developers, and users.

5: It beefs up security

The new programming model for Windows 8 native applications is extraordinarily secure. While I am sure that exploits will be found, it will be difficult for the native applications to break free of their chains. Microsoft has really flipped it around. Instead of allowing everything and slowly adding restrictions over the years (and breaking applications in the process, like XP SP2 and Vista did), it's starting from an "allow nothing" stance.

6: App markets will benefit developers and users

Application markets are nothing new. Even Vista had one (although no one seems to remember it). With Windows 8 native applications, Microsoft is making the application market the primary way of getting apps onto the computer, much like Windows Phone 7. That's great news for developers who need to get some more visibility for their applications and who do not want to deal with payments processing and such, especially for low-priced apps. And the application market is great for users, too. As we've seen, app markets encourage lower prices, and Microsoft will surely apply the same strict quality control that it has to the Windows Phone 7 app market.

7: System restore is easier

Microsoft has built new utilities into Windows 8 that makes it much easier than ever to send the system back to "out of the box," while preserving your data. Providing a more appliance-like experience is critical for the typical user, and the help desk will appreciate it too.

8: Cloud sync is everywhere

While not everyone is in love with the cloud as an idea, Windows 8 has great facilities for allowing applications and users to automatically sync data between devices using the cloud. That's great for users who can seamlessly transition between their tablet and desktop PC (and perhaps their phone), as well as for tech support, who can just replace a broken device instead of worrying about data loss.

9: It offers simplified administration and configuration

The Control Panel has been stripped down to the bare essentials, and you can't even think about tasks like registry editing, defragging, etc., from the Metro UI. (You can do these tasks through the legacy desktop, if needed, but that won't work for ARM devices.) Throughout Windows 8, a primary theme has been giving the user a more appliance-like "It just works" experience. Power users might howl about it, but the truth is, the Windows experience is still far more complex than the average user wants to deal with. Windows 8 is a great move in the right direction for those users.

10: System stability is improved

Windows 7 has really set the standard for system reliability. Short of hardware or driver problems, the old blue screen of death is almost never seen anymore. Windows 8 takes this to the next level. The same changes to the application development model also improve system stability. Applications can't run over each other's data easily, and the new WinRT API just does not allow the kinds of shenanigans that have caused unstable systems over the years. If you stick with native Windows 8 applications, reboots (other than for patching) and crashes should be extraordinarily rare.

More on Windows 8

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

105 comments
BIG &quotL;" LAZLO
BIG &quotL;" LAZLO

i never thuaght of it when i first so it being advertised but after i installed it took me minutes and seconds to believe what my eyes does show me windows is undisputed software programming company in the world. Windows 8 touch .

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Microsoft deals everyday with corporations.Their finger should be right on the pulse.

wrcousert
wrcousert

Here's what I would like to see: I want a single click install of Windows and all the applications that I own. When I buy a new computer, I should be able to enter the serial numbers/keys for all the major applications I own. Microsoft would create a single download that has everything preinstalled, including all the service packs and updates. One download, one restart, no more countless trips to windowsupdate.com or to the various software publishers websites. Click "Install" and ten minutes later your computer is ready to go. Refreshing your computer or moving your applications to a new computer would be just as easy. Windows Update should be capable of detecting all currently supported hardware devices and offer the current drivers for them.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Is windows 9 just going to be a command line?

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

The Internet is just a file.And at some high frequency and low power the files in a computer always run.Files on the hard drive are always running.Mostly apps manipulate the BIOS and the firmware in the computer.Most downloaded software doesn't work at all.If you find a program that works make ten copies and hide it.It's just files guys.Little tiny magnetic blips probably most active at the proton level of the atom.

fhrivers
fhrivers

The people who bitch about Windows 8 and Metro are the types who would probably be happy with just a Powershell prompt. However, since Windows 8 will run on low-cost tablets, it needs to be as "appliance-like" as possible. No regedit, no command prompt and no Powershell. It has to be consumption friendly as well as productivity friendly. People are really underestimating how popular these tablets are going to be.

griff.computerservices@ve
griff.computerservices@ve

After the major league debacles of Windows ME and Vista, many folks (rightly so) are more than a little skeptical of Microsoft's ability to create newer operating systems that are truly *improvements* over their older incarnations. The mere mention of "Vista" still leaves a sour taste in my mouth and makes my blood boil. Consumers were used as unwitting guinea pigs in what a former MS employee confided to me was a most grand 'experiment'. As a long-time user and ultimately a technician of just about every Windows OS, I've witnessed it all; the good, the bad, and the ugly. Now, here comes Microsoft's latest offering. Judging by the many less-than-enthusiastic comments here, many others are also skeptical of Windows 8. After being repeatedly disappointed and abused for so long and often, long-time Windows sufferers are not going to leap blindly onto Microsoft's latest glitzy machination. Like a person dying of thirst in a desert and seeing an "oasis"; only to discover it's merely just another sand dune. Currently, I'm using Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on a laptop and desktop as well as Windows XP on another desktop. The 64-bit iteration, along with 16GB of memory and Intel's i7 CPU on the Win 7 desktop, allows for much speedier encoding/rendering of 64-bit enabled Photoshop, ProShow Producer, Vegas and other graphics and video programs. Based upon what I've read about Windows 8 thus far, it will be quite some time before I embark upon yet another foray into one of Microsoft's unpredictable "new" OS concoctions...

bsemma
bsemma

Im glad Microsoft has moved towards a more vetted and secure process for its apps (*cough*Apple*cough*) instead of a more open and less secure option similar to the Android market. I do feel, however, with this extreme focus on Metro and the tablet market the desktop/power user has been left to wonder if a transition to Linux is in order. I like cross-platform integration, but Microsoft missed focusing on what made their operating system great.

daboochmeister
daboochmeister

Justin, can you clarify what you mean by point #5? Are there fundamental security changes at the kernel level, or are you solely talking about WinRT or something? (or point to a good reference article on it) I'm interested because right now I'm in DCOM/WMI DACL hell, and need you to be my Cassandra if I can expect it to change fundamentally, so that I have to go through it again :-)

abt5050
abt5050

Just 2 monitors? Why not a projective sperical image or better yet a self learning computer image that is a holograph that interacts with us like an assistant? With several systems networked in to each other for the need to work for one person, Instead of on one monitor lapping one task over another. The way they did it in the film AVARTAR Using verberal interface as well as visaul. The technolgy seams to be slowing down around to the look of things. Let XBox and Wii type interface come into play or in the use of the computer work environment as a tool in the work place. I would like to hope the tile type look is another way of doing what the future is trying to project to us.

gileado
gileado

Its true that these guys are after the bucks. However, the truth remains that most of us pros will still remain very comfortable with previous versions of Windows. For God's sake, over here in Africa, everyone is after the idea of simply having the satisfaction of holding some big "machine" that he know next to nothing about. When the whole frenzy subsides, what next..? Windows 50? Seriously Microsoft had better look beyond the obvious.

slobodan.hajdin
slobodan.hajdin

1: It???s designed for tablets and touch Should I write anything more? As a power user I need mouse AND keyboard. So it means PC and/or laptop. 5: It beefs up security - it???s starting from an ???allow nothing??? stance. As a network / database administrator, I often have to use a dirty tricks to repair damage users and /or hardware malfunction caused. I could not do that in the future? No thanks! 6: App markets will benefit developers and users I simply don't see how will app market benefit AutoCAD or something like that. 7: System restore is easier - makes it much easier than ever to send the system back to ???out of the box,??? while preserving your data AAAAAA! As a administrator, I'd appreciate "last known working state", NOT "out of the box". My users are happy keeping their data on servers, and they'd appreciate if I don't have to spend another 4 hours reinstalling applications and setting them. "Out of the box" scheme might work on mobile phones and tablets, but not on PCs and laptops. Not to mention that my definition of "out of the box" computer means already tweaked and adapted for our corporate environment. Or, 3 more hours work from original installation... 8: Cloud sync is everywhere In corporate environment? Yeah, maybe... but not so soon! Not where I work... In my opinion, it's not meant even for power users, not to mention administrators...

jgsilva
jgsilva

Windows 8 will make Vista look like a good idea. I've read stuff about users wanting a tablet with Windows. So maybe there is a market there but not at $800 or $500. Maybe $200 or $300 but MS likes big $s from Windows so Win8 tablets will be expensive and not sell. Like people above have said, there is no reason for people using Win7 or Vista to move to Win8. Business will wait for Win9 which will not have a touch interface you can't turn off or Win 8 SP1 which will add function to turn off the touch UI. Wanted to try the touch tablet but not at $500 or $400. Just got a Kindle Fire. It does what i want from a tablet, email and Web and maybe a little game or two. Amazon had as one editor put it, "Nuked the tablet market", Apple has the high end for those with lost of $ and time to spend doing stuff just to see it work and Fire and Nook have the low end. MS comes to the party late, maybe to late. I have used the Win8 DP for awhile on a HP Envy laptop. It boots fast and shuts down fast for Windows. Plugged in a MS touch 2 mouse and that works some of the touch UI. So maybe some hardware/software will come out and allow touch UI for PCs.

jsm555
jsm555

Since this new version of Win will pretty much not do a single thing for most users, I assume that it'll be priced at less than $25. Right? Right? *crickets*

daldama
daldama

Why are viruses a Windows problem? The company line is to blame it on the number of Windows users; it's popular so it's a target. It that were true then the iPad would be infected with a boatload of virsuses. No...the reason is MS integrating the browser into the O/S back in 1998. And now they want to give deeper O/S access to apps? The anti-virus products will flourish with Windows 8.

leungsk
leungsk

After playing with the beta Win 8, do not believe it will have a smooth ride. The benefit of going on a tablet, ARM support etc... means you will be locked down with the hardware. Yes, it can be installed on a 'normal' desktop. But the UI is really confusing in Metro/traditional mixed mode. A touch enable notebook/netbook has been proven too big. And we can not install OS on a pad/tablet devise. So where should I install Win 8? Is this another Vista where OEM install on a device you buy and expect most people switch back to XP? To me, all the other points are irrelevant or expected from a mature OS. Microsoft has repeatedly put them on marketing material since Win 95.

paulfx1
paulfx1

It isn't going on any systems I use! Because I don't do Windows (TM) I run Linux today, and Linux forever!

Amalia
Amalia

I have been using it for almost a year but the one thing that infuriates me is the dissapearance of my DVD drive from the my comp page. When I switch on the pc sometimes its there but more often then not it isnt. I have had a friend try to repair it but it is still as stuburn as ever. Will someone please create a fix fr this problem. I believe it is a known problem with windows 8 otherewise it works ok with fire fox or any othere browser.

steve.trimmer
steve.trimmer

It sounds like the Nays are far ahead in this new Operating System. My experience in industry is that different functions advance at different times. That Engineers want the new Technology, but CAD comes last because of the detail difficulties. Marketing likes the new bells and whistles, but the data analysis want the data keyboard. If the new Operating System prevents seamless translations back and forth to older Apps, Alternates and Operating Systems; then any transition will be fought by the IT people. If it is this painful, why not go Open Source.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I am still trying to get our applications to work on Windows 7. I am only currently upgrading my own workstation to Windows 7 and am finding many issues installing what I need. Now with their change in security it will again break everything, and you can bet they will change the HAL so that we all need new drivers again. A little stability would be nice.

PineappleBob
PineappleBob

I am not sold on this interface design for CADD and GIS use. I have many tool palettes that I have floating or docked as need bee for certain tasks. I just don't see how an OS migrating to all touch will help me in CADD work, unless it learns how to follow a finger to make a line and know when I want it exactly perpendicular to another line or such. This looks like a nice OS for cloud based stuff, but for my bread and butter, this won't cut it.

blarman
blarman

I'd love for Windows to be more secure and stable. What I don't love is Microsoft's pathological need to change the control interface on _every_ single new release. This is such a pain in the neck. Windows 2000 had it mostly right: instant access to network and most-often-used control panel items. XP came along and decided it needed to "group" these - burying the ones used most (like desktop resolution and network settings) under more layers. Vista and 7 only made this worse (at least 7 has the neat registry hack to expose ALL the control panel tools). Now more of the same. If there is one thing Microsoft should have learned from Google and Apple with regards to a touch device, it is that you need to make it easy to access. Burying these deeper and deeper just frustrates admins and users who have to search and search to find the tool they need.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

My gripes ("bitching") about 8 has to do with desktops/laptops. I've said all along that it may be fine for tablets/phones. I don't want a phone UI on my desktop. It hampers what I do. MS needs to either make two versions or give you the option of selecting which UI you want at install. I don't have a tablet or smart phone (yet) so I can't speak to how it works there. I just know I don't want a kindergarten interface getting in the way on my desktop or laptop

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"However, since Windows 8 will run on low-cost tablets, it needs to be as "appliance-like" as possible." W8 will not be confined to low-cost tablets. Metro is more than appropriate there. The problem is that the exact same version of OS will be the only one available for desktops and laptops, devices that are hampered by the 'appliance-like' GUI.

deneventer
deneventer

TIME WAITS FOR NO MAN AND PEOPLE MUST MOVE WITH THE TIMES. IF IT AINT BROKE DON'T FIX IT AND WHY MUST THE WHEEL CONSTANTLY BE REINVENTED? EVERY UPGRADE DOESN'T SEEM TO GET THE BASIC RECURSIVE PROBLEM SORTED OUT - ON FIRST INSTALL EVERYTHING WORKS FINE - AND THEN FOR SOME STRANGE REASON ALL THESE FUNNY 'CLOSE APPLICATION' END TASK BLAH BLAH BECOME THE RUN OF THE MILL, SO THAT PEOPLE ARE ALL TO HAPPY TO UPGRADE IN HOPES THAT THIS FUNDAMENTAL RECURSIVE ISSUE HAS BEEN SORTED OUT. ITS THE PROGRAMMING THAT IS THE PROBLEM. MORE THAN HALF THE PLANET THAT PROGRAMS DOESN'T UNDERSTAND THAT BASIC ISSUE AND THAT IS MORE THAN HALF THE PROBLEM. YOU CAN'T CALL A FUNCTION IN A FUNCTION - MOST LINK LIBRARIES EVENTUALLY ARE FORCED TO DO JUST THAT - SO ITS IMPOSSIBLE TO DEBUG!!! SO JUST GET THE UPGRADE AND HOPE THE WHEEL SPINS FOR AWHILE BECAUSE ITS NEWLY GREASED - BUT THE AXLE IS STILL BENT - WHO CARES?

Justin James
Justin James

The classic apps still have that wide open, "let's see if we can blow up the OS today" access that they've always had. Metro/WinRT apps are extraordinarily restricted. For details, head over to the "Software Engineer" blog here at TR, where a month or two ago I posted a number very in-depth articles about Windows 8 from a developer's perspective. J.Ja

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You realize that was just a movie, right? That the technology you describe doesn't exist, and won't be affordable for several years after it's developed?

Justin James
Justin James

Good look at the points, but I think that if you look at things from a few different angles, it will look better. 1: Add a Bluetooth KB and maybe a mouse, and your tablet just got a lot more powerful. Or universal docking stations. We're seeing this with iPads and in the Android phone space, expect the same from Windows 8 devices. That goes a LOT way to making it easier to do "real work". 5: The idea is to make disposal devices, and frankly, I could not agree more. When I've got my sys admin/desktop support hat, it costs a small fortune to try to fix desktops! It's a LOT easier and cheaper for me to take a device off the "factory fresh" pile, hand it to the user, and once they've logged in have everything sync and good to go, than it is for me to waste their time and my time attempting to repair problems. 6: I see why you might not see the advantage, but it's there. Things like automatic licensing compliance are huge, not to mention taking the pain out of distribution. I for one would love to be able to stop worrying about patch management (especially of things that aren't part of Windows Update/WSUS) and distributed app installs. 7: When all of your "state" is app settings, which are synced, and all you need to do is hit your app store and select the apps that you own and would like to install on a new device, you are talking about taking an hour or two to go from "clean machine" to "back to where you were". That's a LOT better than wasting your time and life fiddling with restore points, testing, reinstalling stuff, etc. etc. etc. 8: I agree 100% that cloud sync is still a tough sell for the corporate environment. Now... all of that said... I also agree 100% that power users are going to hate it. At the same time, the more I have to deal with power users with my system administrator and desktop support hat on, the more I think that many of them are really just wasting their time being "power users". Are the tweaks and "fixes" they are constantly trying out helping them to be more productive? Far too often, the answer is "no". Maybe it's just that I'm a lot busier than I used to be, just professionally and personally, and as a result I've shifted to a "it just works" mindset. I don't know. But to me, being a "power user" is completely overrated, and I *am* one. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

It's clear that Microsoft has gone all-in on the tablet space with Windows 8. If that's the case, they need to be price-competitive with Android. I would not be shocked to see Windows 8 priced VERY cheaply for OEMs, in the $10 - $50 range. J.Ja

andrewprather
andrewprather

"3: The apps can be integrated into the OS Just as the applications can share with each other, they can do the same thing with Windows itself. Again, this allows some really neat integrations to be done without much work by application makers. You can see things like a new social networking application come out and within weeks, Windows will be able to use your friends who are on it in its contact list, or the pictures can go into your picture gallery. The possibilities are endless." So instead of making the kernel more secure, we allow less sophisicated viruses have a go at taking over the kernel. Awesome idea!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Try reposting this in the 'Q&A' forum. The 'Discussion' forum is for matters of general discussion, not specific problems in search of a solution. The 'Water Cooler' is for non-technical discussions. You can submit a question to 'Q&A' here: http://www.techrepublic.com/forum/questions/post?tag=mantle_skin;content There are TR members who specifically seek out problems in need of a solution. Although there is some overlap between the forums, you'll find more of those members in 'Q&A' than in 'Discussions' or 'Water Cooler'. Be sure to use the voting buttons to provide your feedback. Voting a '+' does not necessarily mean that a given response contained the complete solution to your problem, but that it served to guide you toward it. This is intended to serve as an aid to those who may in the future have a problem similar to yours. If they have a ready source of reference available, perhaps won't need to repeat questions previously asked and answered. If a post did contain the solution to your problem, you can also close the question by marking the helpful post as "The Answer".

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Lack of functional apps in some categories (notably CAD). Lack of compatibility with customer or vendor apps.

dogknees
dogknees

It will only accelerate in the future, not only in IT but in all things. Get ready to start learning new way to do things on a weekly basis. Personally, I can't wait.

dschlesak
dschlesak

I went to Windows 7 - 64 Ultimate on the advice of what I read and thinking that the OS will be faster and more reliable than Win XP. Sorry Charlie!!! I have had nothing but problems. Hate the Libraries. I used the advice of Tech Republic on how to get rid of them only to have them come back on their own. Constant problems with one thing or another. Can't write to my own folders under libraries even with Administrator privileges. I tried to copy some videos only to find that the system told me that the files are no longer in the folder I was copying from. Went to the original folder and tried to write them back to the folder only to be told that I cannot write the files because they are already there but they were not. Used a un-delete program to try and recover them but they were not there. I guess they went into never never land never to be found again. My grandsons first soccer game - some great videos no more to be seen. Give me back Win XP.

dogknees
dogknees

You imply that these slow downs, errors and so on are somehow intrinsic to the design of Windows. If this was the case, it would happen to ALL Windows PCs. It doesn't. My last PC ran happily for 7 years (yes it really was overdue for replacement) and still booted to login in less than 25 seconds. It's the crap people install and download without thought that can cause these issues. It's entirely up to the user whether they take reasonable care not to load crapware and a million different virus scanners. It's entirely up to the user whether they make an effort to learn their way around the system or not. People that make no effort to do these things will of course get bitten. Just as they do in other areas of life where they make no attempt to learn about the world around them. Wilful ignorance is not a positive character trait. Your choices, your problem.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

Actually I'm for that. I'm more interested in doing my job than being a power user. But I want to be able to fix things when they go wrong. Previous experience says something will go wrong sometime. Good read. Didn't even know 8 was out.

Justin James
Justin James

Apps do NOT have direct access to the OS, in fact, they have NONE other than very limited, read-only access to a select few APIs. What they do is integrate via "contracts" and "interfaces" which expose only a very limited amount of data, in a way pre-defined by Microsoft. It's extraordinarily secure in comparison to the current way of doing things. J.Ja

paulfx1
paulfx1

I've been Windows free for 16 years now so I doubt Microsoft releasing Windows 8 is going to change that.

Justin James
Justin James

It's always possible that this will push the traditional desktop market to various open source apps and platforms. J.Ja

bboyd
bboyd

I can dream right?

Slayer_
Slayer_

I am sick of being in reaction development, constantly trying to fix bugs, never leaving room to improve or innovate. Now we got Windows 8 to break everything all over again.

Pinkwho
Pinkwho

I'm sorry to burst your bubble, but that is the way it is. I have been running Win 7 since beta 1 and I can honestly say I have NEVER had any of these issues. possibly hardware, other software or PEBKAC??? don't know but just remember change is the only constant!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I've never had corresponding problems with Windows. What I've lived and learned is that with a few precautions, Windows can be used safely and stably, especially since W2K. There are plenty of places where Linux excels and is appropriate; my point all along has been that a Windows discussion isn't one of those places.

paulfx1
paulfx1

Windows is to crap pop music as Linux is to the classics. I like how you think! Once I had a bad squid at a Chinese restaurant and I swore it off for quite some time. The health department did close that place down shortly after that too. Which didn't exactly make me feel any better. But it wasn't a new Chinese restaurant. Those I do like to eat at because they really haven't had time to be around long enough to let things go bad, then serve them. You really are taking your life into your own hands though when you eat buffets. I knew that squid was bad while I was chewing it so I should have just spit it out. Live and learn. That would have been so uber gross though! So I manned up and just swallowed it. Kind of like you Windows users huh? Why don't any of you live and learn?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

you felt compelled to interject that into a Windows discussion. Tell me, when people are discussing the new album from a pop music group, do you butt in that you only listen to classical music? If other people are discussing a new Chinese restaurant, do you interrupt to mention that you eat only Italian? Your comment had nothing to do with the discussion at hand, but every Windows discussion draws at least one off-topic "I use Linux / OS X!" post.

Justin James
Justin James

... because I know how businesses work. The ship sailed on the "Year of Linux" chances a long time ago. Reality is, we're getting ready for "last call" on the desktop paradigm entirely. You're never going to see "Year of Linux" on desktops, and we're witnessing the end of the "nearly three decades of Windows" on the desktop too. If there *is* a "Year of Linux" it will not be in desktop, it will be in mobile, and it will come when tablets supplant laptops/desktops for most work, thanks to docking station systems. I honestly believe that within a few years of good docking stations being available for tablets, classic Windows desktop will have a market penetration in business like OS X does... a few percent, for specialized tasks. Just like you have a few Macs in a business for, say, the graphics artists or the people writing the corporate iPhone app, and you have a few Linux desktops for some other specialized apps (statistics or number crunching, etc.), you'll have a few traditional PCs for the folks using Visual Studio, AutoCAD, etc. J.Ja

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You realize you're this close to a 'Year of the Linux' post, right? We all know how those turn out. :D

paulfx1
paulfx1

You can't code. Plus EMC2 runs on Ubuntu. Although I did setup Debian to run RTAI. Mostly because I don't like Ubuntu.