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10 things to love (and hate) about IE 8

Does IE 8 offer some legitimate enhancements -- or is it just more of the same? Deb Shinder runs through several of the new IE 8 features, many of which she says are big improvements.

Does IE 8 offer some legitimate enhancements -- or is it just more of the same? Deb Shinder runs through several of the new IE 8 features, many of which she says are big improvements.


Microsoft recently released Beta 2 of Internet Explorer 8 to the public. Although it's still a beta, this version is said to be feature-complete. Many folks have downloaded it, and reviews, as usual, are mixed. If you want to try it out for yourself, you can download it from Microsoft. You can run it on XP and on both the 32- and 64-bit editions of Vista, Server 2003, and Server 2008. There are different downloads for each OS, so be sure you get the appropriate one.

In my opinion, Microsoft did a good -- but not perfect -- job with this one. Here are some of the characteristics of the new browser that I love, and a few others I don't like so much.

Note: This information is also available as an image gallery and a PDF download.

#1: Faster is better

In the computer world, we never seem to get past the need for speed. We want faster connections, faster hardware, faster software. IE 8 is noticeably faster than IE 7 on most Web sites. Pages "pop" in a way that I never saw in its predecessor (but did see in Firefox). Pages with JavaScript or AJAX load much faster, thanks to the improved script engine. This increased performance is likely to be one of the features that's most noticeable -- and most useful -- to users.

#2: Like a rock

Stability is at least as important as speed. IE 7 never was stable. On occasion, usually at least a couple of times per day, it would just stop responding for no apparent reason. Try to click a link, try the back button, even try to close the browser normally, and you got nothing. When that happened, I would have to open Task Manager and kill it there. This happened on both XP and Vista machines, and many others told me that it happened to them, too. I knew plenty of users who went back to IE 6 for that reason, but I wasn't willing to give up my tabs.

I've been using IE 8 many hours a day now for over a week and not once has it crashed. If a site or add-on does cause a crash in IE 8, it's designed so that only that one tab goes down instead of taking the entire browser down with it. And that brings us to the next thing I love.

#3: Crash recovery

Yes, I know Firefox already had it. That's one of the reasons my loyalty has been divided between IE 7 and Firefox ever since I installed the former. Now IE has it, too: the ability to recover your last browsing session in case the browser does crash, or even if you just accidentally close it yourself.

I don't know how many times I've cursed IE 7 when I was in the middle of some complex research and had half a dozen tabs open that I had come to through all sorts of routes, and the browser decided to go down -- taking all my tabs. Sometimes it was my own fault; I was doing 10 things at once, had three or four separate browser windows open, and closed the wrong one. What a pain it was to try to find those pages again. Now you just open a new tab and click the Reopen Last Browsing Session Link, as shown in Figure A.

Figure A

crash recovery
You can easily recover closed tabs or the entire previous browsing session.

The new page also has links for every tab you've closed during the session, so you can get them back if you close only one tab accidentally. This feature will save many users much grief (or keep them from having to switch to Firefox, as I did, when doing anything important or complicated on the Web).

#4: Browsing in private

Much fuss has been made over the new InPrivate feature in IE 8, with some pundits calling it "porn mode" because it allows you to cover your tracks by preventing browsing history and cache files from being retained. Of course, some people will use this to conceal the fact that they've been visiting naughty Web sites, but there are other, legitimate reasons to use the InPrivate feature. It also prevents the computer from retaining your user names and passwords and from retaining information you type into Web forms, as well as preventing cookies from being stored on your system.

It's not a feature I expect to use much, but it would certainly be useful when using public computers or those shared with coworkers or family members under certain circumstances (for instance, when buying a surprise birthday gift for your spouse). It's off by default; to turn it on, you just open a new tab and click the "Start InPrivate Browsing" link, which you can also see in Figure A.

#5: Tab grouping

Microsoft may be accused of copying some of IE 8's new features, such as crash recovery, from Firefox. And Google's Chrome browser, released in beta just a few days after the IE 8 beta 2 release, has a similar private browsing feature that's called Incognito browsing. But IE 8 has one new feature that, as far as I can tell, is all its own -- although I won't be surprised if others copy it in the future. That's color-coded tab grouping, which lets you see at a glance which tabs have been opened from links within other tabs because all the related tabs are the same color. This is actually more useful than it sounds, and you can see what it looks like in Figure B.

Figure B

tab grouping

Tab grouping color codes related tabs so you can tell at a glance which pages were opened from within which other pages.

When you right-click a tab, you have the options to close that tab, close the entire group, or remove the tab from the group.

#6: Accelerators and Web Slices

Accelerators (which were called Activities in the earlier betas) are little add-ins that make it quick and easy to apply a task to highlighted text. For example, you can select a paragraph within a Web page and translate it to another language without having to copy it and go to a translation site and paste it in. Or you can highlight a word and define it using a variety of sources, such as Encarta, Dictionary.com, or Wikipedia. Or you can highlight an address or geographic location (city, state, country) on a Web page and get a map directly on that page, without having to go to a mapping Web site.

The accelerators that you've installed appear in the right context menu when you highlight text on a page and right click it, as shown in Figure C.

Figure C

accelerators

Right-clicking highlighted text lets you choose from among installed accelerators to process the text.
Figure D shows what happens when you highlight the word "Afghanistan" and select the Map With Live Maps accelerator.

Figure D

mapping

The accelerators display the requested information within the site, without requiring you to copy and paste into another page.

A large number of accelerators are available. You can download them from the IE Gallery.

Web slices are like RSS feeds, in that they let you subscribe to content so that you're updated when it changes. With the slices, though, you don't have to subscribe to an entire page; there can be different slices within a page. Your selected slices are added to the Favorites bar, and when new information becomes available, the Web slice will be highlighted. You simply click the slice in the Favorites bar to get a preview of the updated content; clicking on that will take you to the site itself.

#7: Getting suggestive with search

IE 8 attempts to make it easier to find what you're looking for by offering helpful suggestions along the way. When you type a search term, you can see suggestions that are based on your own browsing history and your chosen search provider. For instance, typing just a few letters brings up suggestions that may be relevant to your search, as shown in Figure E.

Figure E

searc

IE 8 offers suggestions based on the search term (or partial term) you type, your selected search provider, and your browsing history.

It's also easier to find specific information on a Web page with IE 8. When you select Find On This Page from the Edit menu or press Ctrl + F, a toolbar appears below the row of tabs. This is a welcome change from the Find dialog box that would pop up in IE 7 and obscure part of your Web page.

The Find function searches as you type, and highlights the matches in yellow, as shown in Figure F.

Figure F

find function

The new Find On This Page function is faster and easier to use.
The address bar is smarter now, too. You can type a search term there instead of in the Search box, and you'll see suggestions of sites that pertain to the text you typed, based on your browsing history, as shown in Figure G.

Figure G

address bar

The address bar in IE 8 is smarter now.

#8: Security, security, security

Security is on all our minds these days, and IE 8 adds a number of security enhancements. The good news is that it has done so without making security "in your face" -- a common complaint about Windows Vista's enhanced security.

New security features include:

  • DEP/NX memory protection to help prevent nonexecutable code from running in memory.
  • Changes to ActiveX that will isolate the controls installed by a particular user (per-user ActiveX), so that if one user should install a malicious control, other user accounts won't be affected.
  • XSS filter that makes it more difficult for attackers to exploit cross-site scripting vulnerabilities.
  • SmartScreen filter (formerly the phishing filter) that's faster and more user-friendly and has been given Group Policy support and new heuristics.

For more information about IE 8 security enhancements, see the series of posts to the IE Blog on the MSDN site.

#9: Where did those toolbars go?

Some new IE 8 users have complained that their Links bar disappeared after installation. Actually, it gets a new name: Now it's part of the Suggested Sites bar. It retains the links you had on your Links bar in IE 7. If you open a second instance of IE 8, you may not see the links by default. You can grab the edge of the Suggested Sites bar and move it up or down to a new line, and it will expand so you can see your links again. This is slightly annoying, although it's far outweighed by the improvements in IE 8.

Another thing that I've heard several users complain about is the fact that when they installed IE 8, it disabled their Google toolbar. In fact, a few told me that they rolled back to IE 7 solely because of that. I haven't used the Google toolbar much with IE 7 because it added the built-in search bar, where you can select Google as your search provider if you want. However, some folks miss other features of the Google toolbar, such as the ability to save toolbar settings online and access them from any computer.

In the earlier beta of IE 8, the Google toolbar caused frequent crashes. This is likely the reason Microsoft disabled it by default in Beta 2. It does not remove it, however, and you can re-enable it by clicking View | Toolbars and checking Google Toolbar. When I've done so as an experiment, it has functioned with no problem, but be aware that it may cause instability.

#10: Standards break some sites

For many years, Microsoft has been criticized for not adhering to Web standards established by the W3C (the World Wide Web Consortium, which creates specifications and standards for the Web) in previous versions of IE. Opera even filed a lawsuit with the EU asking the European Commission to force Microsoft to follow the standards.

By default, IE 8 complies with all established standards. Ironically, this causes some Web sites (those that were designed for IE 6 and IE 7) to display improperly in IE 8. For instance, some content may not show up or things may be misaligned.

However, Microsoft anticipated this and included a Compatibility button. Its icon, appropriately enough, is a representation of a broken page, and it appears at the right end of the address bar along with the Refresh and Stop icons, as shown in Figure H. If a page doesn't render correctly, you can click this button, and IE 8 will go into compatibility mode and behave like IE 6/7, so the page will appear correctly.

Figure H

compatibility

IE 8's compliance with Web standards may break some sites, but they can be fixed with the click of a button.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

37 comments
fcart
fcart

i installed ie 8 and my history stopped working!

saschwab
saschwab

Absolutely hate it. I have run into so many compatability problems I have lost count. I have uninstalled it, do not recommend it to people. Unfortunately it came installed on my work machine and there is no way to get it off of it and beleive me I have checked.

theja_sudiendra
theja_sudiendra

Hi Dude, This is a very good, I cant wait to install IE8 on my system, I had a bad experience with the IE7 and XP,so i had to reinstall IE6 on my system. Now i am looking forward with great expectations.....;-)

Rob C
Rob C

When I open the browser, I want all the Tabs that were present (at last closing) to be re-opened. Surely I don'y have to go to the Tools menu every flippin time to ask for this ? Practically every other browser does that as a default.

tiffanymartin
tiffanymartin

I found this information quite helpful. I can now make a decision on downloading it. :)

brianna1940
brianna1940

Thanks for sharing 10 Important things with us . Its really very important. --------- brianna Dating

mikes_line
mikes_line

I tried it on my VISTA SP1. It's not ready for prime time yet. Had to use the IE7 compt mode too much, and, IE8 would hang. I couldn't reproduce the hang reliably. 1st, when it hung, it locked that window. CAD would not close the window. After some time a pop up window announced the session was not responding (dah!) and offer 3 choices. From my trying all three, none really worked. 2. When I finally got the IE8 session closed it would close ALL OTHER IE8 sessions. I'm back on FF & IE7. MH from Ellicott City MD

saved2serve
saved2serve

Sounds better, and any improvement is a help. Questions: Are different themes available? Can you save different sessions for later browsing? Is built in spell checking available? Does it allow you to undo closed tabs (plural)? Can you embed the url with the page when you save it? Or copy all the url's? All these and more are available in FF (though i cannot get Colorful Tabs to work in 3.01), mostly through extensions. Community involvement, and the freedom and ability to improve helps to effect greater versatility and customization (God did not make us clones:), while MS seems hindered in this regard by corporate institutionalization, and a certain view of users that supposes that users do not want or are not to be entrusted with much info (no details in folder views or file transfers by default, or to view certain User files, etc.) or freedom (themes, etc.).

davidmathiraj
davidmathiraj

Hey ! Don't praise to much of IE8. It is a shame to Microsoft to adopt, copy and .......... then realise that they have to bring this IE8. Much to say Firefox had already over taken IE8 and all the Firefox users and I am also one among them to enjoy the stability, colour and so all the things you beat now. Open your eyes and look into Firefox clearly and you will find this IE8 is still a baby to learn more from brother Firefox.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I decided to give it a rip for a day or two. Upon install it was a slug, but got a little quicker after a bit of tweaking and restarts. I HATE the new toolbar layouts, they act as if locked when they are not. I have an Adobe file conversion icon and teh Home button, the rest I ditch. But you can't stack these TWO buttons on the same plain. They have to be underneath each other. So Adobe gets a screen wide piece of real estate just for one icon. The home button gets squished to one side on teh same plain as the tabs and opposite Favorites. NO matter what I tried, customizing tools, draging, resizing etc. cannot get them on the same plain. So I just deleted teh Adobe button in order to get the Home and Print buttons on the same row ABOVE the tabs. It is slow as hell, waiting for the address bar to populate and open is painful. Looked to MS for tips/known issues, nothing there. I also don't like the way it organizes favorites, visisted sites and even lists History on the address bar drop down, what a jumbled pain in teh arse. YOu can delete entries individuallly but I don't see how you can simply omit everything but addresses. Slow, poorly designed interface and the coloured tabs is just ridiculous. It's like it was designed for preschool kids who can't keep track of multiple open pages. It hung several times and needed a task kill to get it closed. IE7 for me again now, I prefer FF but IE7 has been much faster and trouble free for me so for IE I will stick with/revert to 7.

liadi_con
liadi_con

WELL IE IS MY FAVOURITE, IE8 MAKES ME LOVE MS IE BEST.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

While I have yet to try it, maybe later today, from yoru descriptions (which were excellent) I see the following. Accelerators: Sound good, will have to explore the options Suggestions Tab: Yuck! tha last thing i want when searchign for something is some predictive text crap trying to figure ot what I am looking for, I'll find it myself thanks. The idea of a list popping up kinda give me the willies. The new FIND feature is nice, I often have to search for text on pages. Google toolbar: ICK!! Hate that crap, again just more real estate, but with the search bar being on the same plain as the address bar, like FF, it looks like it will be okay if needed. Suggestive Links: No thanks, let me browse alone. The coloured tabs: Is this for dummies who can't watch the tabs and realize which is which? I don't get it, who can't keep track of the pages that open when yuo click links? If something opens in a new link I always seem to nitice it and either want it or close it. I also have an incredible ability to click the tab and decide if i need to keep it open or close it all by myself. Faster? More stable? While IE7 has NEVER EVER crashed or locked up on me, using Vista, I suppose faster is faster and that's all that matters. Thanks for your excellent review, very informative and open minded!

SkyWlf77
SkyWlf77

Unless there is an option to install the same Flashblock and Adblock that I use with Firefox, I will not be using IE8, just like I don't use IE7. Blocking the Flash Object and the Ads is not only great for cleaning up web pages, but it has also prevented quite a few virus/spyware infections in the process, especially when using MySpace. Until IE has these same add-ons or uses them as built-in features, I won't be using IE.

kitteryguy
kitteryguy

OMG! Look at all those toolbars. It looks like a browser designed by the AOL UI team. Blech!

Scholia
Scholia

You get crash recovery, spell checking and many other features in IE7 by adding IE7Pro. Also, IE7 is very stable until it runs out of resources, which tends to happen after a couple of days. (I keep a memory meter in my SysTray.) It leaks memory. This is also true of Firefox 2 ;-)

venividivici2003
venividivici2003

Need I say anything more?I does all my browsing properly, loads quickly, and has a ton of addons. I like Open source products...

cupcake
cupcake

I may never see it! At work we're still using proprietary apps that require IE6 and won't work (without a lot of time and money) to upgrade to a newer version of IE. Most of it won't work anywhere else including other browsers. Sigh. And at home, its Mac time, so Safari wins out there.

edmicman1
edmicman1

I primarily use Firefox 3, but have to use IE for some internal work sites, too. I of course tried out IE8 when it came out, and Chrome when it was released. In my mind, IE8 is what IE7 *should* have been. I've always found IE7 to be slooooow, clunky, and inflexible. I could start Firefox, ctrl-L for the address location, type a new page, while that is opening ctrl-T for a new tab, type in the address for a second site, and be there before I could open IE7, wait for the browser to respond, open a new tab, etc. IE7 was just doggy and unstable. I found IE8 to be a lot faster. I still have some occasional stability problems with IE8, but not often. It still feels like an incremental improvement over 7, though. I think the real value is in the extensibility of Firefox, though. Articles usually compare out-of-the-box features, which is good, but it's good to know how to get the most out of your browser. I haven't found anything in any of the browsers that matches Adblock Plus on Firefox - even Opera's built-in adblocking feature. That alone keeps me on Firefox as I can't stand browsing pages anymore without it. I'll be interested in seeing where Chrome goes....it definitely has a lot of potential, especially if it can create a community of extension developers around it, too.

marvin.novello
marvin.novello

I tried IE8 on an XP laptop recently and was getting along fine until I had to go to adobe.com I was looking for product updates but found that IE8 froze completely every time I arrived at adobe's site. Its not like Adobe is a small company so I was a bit dissapointed with that. (and yes I did have flash and shockwave installed before arriving at the site) I daresay I'll give it another try on a Vista machine. I'm generally pro Microsoft - although I'll try other stuff out - so I won't judge them too harshly. Before the adobe issue I did like IE8 quite a lot - for all the reasons you highlight. One thing that didn't get a mention was a new function in the address bar. Its a small thing but I like it: If you have a url in the address bar - e.g. www.techsite.com you can now double click in "techsite" and only the "techsite" part gets highlighted - allowing you to type another domain name without messing around with the www or com parts. I used to like this function in firefox and used it a lot. Try the same thing in IE6 or IE7 and you will select the whole URL. I must say though that I have never had any of the problems you describe with IE7. Its always run very stably for me on a variety of XP and Vista machines. I often have multiple browser windows and multiple apps running and justhaven't seen that freezing/crahing behaviour. So - overall I liked it and will have another try on Vista - and on XP after a few more builds - or post-beta. Tried Chrome out also recently and was disappointed by the way it rendered some of my JavaScript pages on my business website. I daresy I'll try that again later too as I produce JavaScript pages for a living.

TG2
TG2

One thing bad, and since IE7 its been so, is adding to the favorites. In ie6, when you wanted to save in a specific folder, you were presented with a list of your top most favorites folders ... you then drilled down into subfolders by double clicking them.. in ie7 and continued in ie8 they've done away with the sane mans drill down and shown us EVERY folder that it could POSSIBLY DISPLAY top to bottom of the screen ... I've 400 + links, and 113 folders... several folder names are identical under the top level or subsequent folders under the top ... because while the link may be "Microsoft" related ... some things address Work problems, some address user/computer problems, and still others might just be download links that were hard to find.. but with opening every top level folder, and subfolder under them.. when I go to add links I have to scroll the long list, and sometimes become lost for which level I'm under BECAUSE there are so many displayed rather than just allowing me to drill down. I would MUCH rather have the option to chose how I see those folders when I go to Add Favorites ... One thing misrepresented, is that ever since IE6 (don't recall in ie5) I've been able to search from the address bar.. and so has everyone else! This isn't something new in IE8 .... you just start typing your words up there, and the URL's are checked, Local desktop is checked (bad microsoft very bad) and when you hit enter (if the urls' didn't match what you needed, the search was off to microsoft ... who would then redirect your search based on your preference for default search provider. Now the way they display as you type searches is different and perhaps a little more nice, but the feature has always been there.. (just look in the ADVANCED tab of IE7 ... just under "Printing" is "Search from the address bar" with two options, go to the sight or just display results.... been there.. not new... just improved maybe. And lastly.. is IE8 better? better than??? 7? Most definitely.. I've even recommended a friend that uses 6 exclusively to check out 8 *because* it cleared up the one or two things he hated most about ie7 ... is ie8 better than other browsers? .. still a mixed bag.. I like the plug-ins that you can get for Firefox way more than IE ... Oh and one last thing, both a kudos and a curse for Microsoft ... the last steps has you going through and accepting Accelerators ... not realizing what they meant I did more info... the Kudos is that microsoft *does* give you the choice before locking you into their stuff.. but curse however is that microsoft doesn't word it well and I would recommend people customize / get asked about every accelerator, so that they can choose properly. because IE8 is microsoft, microsoft defaults to giving you your current search provider, but with new or microsoft-centric 'accelerators' like microsoft's maps, microsoft's dictionary (encarta), and microsoft's live logging feature ... personally I've liked google's maps way longer than anything microsoft has done, and find most of google's tools are less likely to pop-up ads, and other stuff on me.. so Kudo's for giving people the option, but curses for not making the language more clear, and for not defaulting people to be asked for each tool/accelerator that microsoft wants to push on you. IE8 ... worth the try.. the security .... who knows...

m__faraz
m__faraz

Just FYI, Firefox has a plugin that makes tabs color coded and groups them as and when necessary. Your article might just make me want to switch back to IE - just.

david.leigh
david.leigh

Looks like some good directions for IE8. Competition is always good in the browser wars. Perhaps some will find it harder to make MS their whipping boy with this...heh...heh...perhaps not. Some people are just grumpy. Speaking of being grumpy, I'm typically grumpy when people speak of IE vs. Firefox like they are the only choices. One choice (my favorite) that is rarely mentioned is Maxthon. I MUCH prefer it over Firefox...even if it does rely on IE's rendering engine. It simply makes browsing (out of the box...without searching for a ton of addins) work the way I like it. Even in Win2K (still free for lots of schools...hence very much in service) you can run Maxthon2 and have an excellent browsing experience even though IE7/8 won't go there.

Rob C
Rob C

I have uninstalled IE8, and installed IE7. It also requires clicks to do what I want. So I installed IE7Pro (an AddIn), and it automatically restores the last session.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

Why does a brand-new, latest-and-greatest, state-of-the-art-technology browser need an Accelerator? One would think that "fast" would be a basic design criterion for a new product.

dinosaur_z
dinosaur_z

for those times that I have to. www.ie7pro.com Otherwise, I'll just stick with FF3. #1: Faster is better FF3 #2: Like a rock FF3 #3: Crash recovery FF3 #4: Browsing in private FF3 #5: Tab grouping "Colorful tabs" extension to FF3 #6: Accelerators and Web Slices can't say about this one, though think there are FF3 extensions to do this. #7: Getting suggestive with search Already in FF3 #8: Security, security, security Noscript, Adblock, etc. in FF3 #9: Where did those toolbars go? no comment #10: Standards break some sites Never been a problem for me with FF3

extremejm
extremejm

and I didn't have to wait two versions to get the features. Microsoft is pretty good at copying other company's features but not very good at coming up with things on their own.

M.W.H.
M.W.H.

Although I also like most of what they have done, installing IE8 caused so many crashes that I had to remove it yesterday and now I'm stable again. I could put up with it by simply not using IE8 until it became stable but it was even causing Firefox and Opera to crash citing problems with ntdll.dll and mshtml.dll which are both Microsoft items. (I have to assume there are new versions of these programs installed when you upgrade to IE8 but others will correct me if I'm wrong on this) Anyways, I'm going to wait a few weeks to see if they fix this.

rweave2
rweave2

How do u know when there is a newer version coming out? I installed IE 8 and now on my MSN i cannot get history, open new page, or get the calendar. A small window appears saying error and has to close. as i said this is on MSN Premium. The Internet Explorer seems to work ok but i prefer being on MSN Premium. It also will not let me go back to version 7, Any suggestions? Thanks.

paul.eggers
paul.eggers

No need to type all that in, anyway. Just type "techsite" in the address bar, hold down the Ctrl key and hit Enter. It puts the www before and adds the .com after.

cipherjason
cipherjason

The first add-on I ever got for firefox was the colorful tabs (which was the first day I used it - long long time ago). Originally, the add-on only made the tabs look pretty since the colours were random and I noticed the option to associate by site had crept in a long while later. However it has never grouped the tabs together, but then there are other add-ons to do exactly that e.g. tree style tabs. I don't really see anything special about IE8 here that makes it any better than the new FF3, which has just about all this stuff (and I'm sure add-ons are available for the rest). But hey it's a huge browser war and they're all copying each other...

d_k914
d_k914

I was just about to post the same thing. Firefox has had that for a while, granted its not a core feature. Ironically i believe this was mentioned by tech republic a few weeks ago in a post titled something like "10 Firefox plugins you can't live without".

bsnake
bsnake

I love the new address bar functions but wish they didn't include the "X" delete button, especially where it is. When I click the drop-down, the X is right where I usually click, so I keep deleting links - frustrating! I love the changes I've seen, the tab behavior is now the way I wish it had been from the start.

bowpeep52
bowpeep52

Today, after reading Deb's article on 10 Things to Love (and Hate) About IE 8, I upgraded from IE7 to IE 8 Beta 2. The only problem which made me go back to IE7, is the drop down menu "Tools", "Page" "Print" disappeared...not sure why? The menu icons remained after IE8 install, but when you click on the icon there was nothing displayed in the drop down view. Did I do something wrong during installation or is there a fix to have these menu items the same as in IE7? Thanks!

twilliams870
twilliams870

Looks like another version that will need to be QA'd against. Since a lot of our customers do not upgrade their browser, we have to test against all IE releases (at least the last 3 or 4) to make sure our interface is compatible.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

'Microsoft is pretty good at copying other company's features but not very good at coming up with things on their own. ' "Ribbon Interface" is all theirs - their idea, their implementation. (I hate it, but it's all theirs...) ;-)

EastExpertG
EastExpertG

When you run IE8 Beta 2 on a system without truckload of third-party add-ons (most of which haven't yet been updated to work with IE8), it appears very stable and I concur with the Original Poster in that it's indeed rock stable. You could try remove the old versions of existing toolbars (or at least disable them) and see how it improves. Google toolbar, Live toolbar, Yahoo one, etc. etc. (If your system crashes in Firefox & Opera, too, this probably has nothing to do with IE, FF, Opera or Microsoft, but is just a b*gg*red system altogether.

EastExpertG
EastExpertG

Other Country Top Level Domains (CCTLD's) could be also entered with Ctrl+Shift+Enter; just don't forget to configure it in IE Options: Tools > Internet Options > "General" tab > Languages button > Prefix & Suffix options group! Use it all the time for .co.uk -- pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter on amazon would give me "www.amazon.co.uk" :)

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