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10 things you should know about moving from Windows XP to Windows 7

Jumping from Windows XP to Windows 7 will require some specialized knowledge. Greg Shultz offers advice specifically for those taking this route.

Jumping from Windows XP to Windows 7 will require some specialized knowledge. Greg Shultz offers advice specifically for those taking this route.


If you skipped Windows Vista and stuck with Windows XP, chances are good that you are now seriously considering moving to Windows 7 after it's released on October 22. If so, there is much for you to do. Not only should you begin planning for your operating system migration, but you should begin learning as much as you can about Windows 7. Here are 10 things you can do to get ready for the switch.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Check your hardware

Windows 7 was designed to be lean in terms of hardware, so that it will be able to function satisfactorily on sub-powered netbooks. If you're running Windows XP on a computer manufactured within the last three or four years, chances are good that Windows 7 will run fine on your system. However, you can make sure that your hardware is compatible by running Microsoft's Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.

The Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor will perform a detailed scan of your entire system, checking hardware, programs, and peripheral devices. Once the scan is complete, the Upgrade Advisor will display a report telling you whether your system meets the hardware requirements and idenfying are any known compatibility issues with your programs and devices. If it finds problems, the Upgrade Advisor will provide suggestions you can use to better analyze your upgrade options to Windows 7.

You can download the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor from the Microsoft Download Center. At the time of this writing, this tool is listed as being a Beta version. However, running it now will give you a good idea of what you will be facing as you prepare for your upgrade.

If you're planning a much bigger Windows XP to Windows 7 migration, you'll want to investigate the Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit. This free toolkit, which runs across the network without having to install software on client systems, will allow you to investigate systems and compile reports on hardware and device compatibility.

2: Understand the Custom Install

If you're running Windows XP on your computer and you want to use Windows 7 on that same computer, you'll purchase an Upgrade license package of Windows 7. However, you won't be able to perform an in-place upgrade. In other words, you won't be able to upgrade to Windows 7 on top of XP and keep all your applications and settings "in place." Instead, you'll have to perform a Custom Install, which Microsoft describes as follows:

A custom (clean) installation gives you the option to either completely replace your current operating system or install Windows on a specific drive or partition that you select. You can also perform a custom installation if your computer does not have an operating system, or if you want to set up a multiboot system on your computer.

When you completely replace Windows XP, the installation procedure will not totally obliterate it. In fact, the installation procedure will create a folder on the hard disk called Windows.old and will place the Windows, Documents And Settings, and Program Files folders from your Windows XP installation in it. Your data files will be safe and accessible, but your applications will not be viable. (Even though the Custom Install saves your data in the Windows.old folder, you will want to have a separate backup on hand just in case!)

Regardless of whether you choose to completely replace Windows XP or set up a multiboot system, you are going to have to back up and transfer all of your data, reinstall all of your applications, and reconfigure all of your settings.

3: Consider a setting up a multiboot configuration

When pondering a Custom Install, you should consider setting up a multiboot configuration. That will place both Windows XP and Windows 7 at your disposal, which will be a big advantage as you begin migrating your settings, documents, and applications. More specifically, you can boot into Windows XP to check out how something is set up and then boot into Windows 7 to re-create the same configuration. Once you have everything in Windows 7 exactly the way you had it in Windows XP, you can remove the multiboot configuration set Windows 7 as the primary OS and then remove Windows XP.

To be able to perform this type of switch, both XP and 7 must be installed on the same hard disk but on separate partitions. (If you install Windows 7 on a second hard disk, the boot partition will exist on the first hard disk, so you won't be able to remove that drive once you're ready to get rid of XP.) As a result, you'll need to repartition your hard disk to make room for Windows 7. To repartition your hard disk without destroying data, you can take advantage of partition management software, such as Norton PartitionMagic 8.0, which retails for about $70, or Easeus Partition Manager Home Edition 4.0.1, which is available for free and earned a 4.5 star rating in a recent CNET editors' review.

4: Plan your backup and restore strategy

Before you move from one operating system to another, you'll want to back up all your data -- at least once and maybe twice, just in case. While it may sound like overkill, having an extra backup will give you peace of mind.

If you're using a third-party backup program, you will need to check the manufacturer's Web site to see whether the program will be upgraded to work in Windows 7. If you aren't using a third-party backup program, you're probably using Windows XP's native Backup Utility. As you may have heard, the file format used for this tool isn't compatible with Windows Vista's Backup And Restore Center. To provide for that, Microsoft released a special version of the XP Backup Utility, called the Windows NT Backup - Restore Utility. It's designed specifically for restoring backups made on Windows XP to computers running Windows Vista. While I was unable to get official confirmation, it is a safe bet that this special version will work in Windows 7 or will be adapted to do so.

If you aren't willing to take that bet or you are not sure whether your third-party backup program will be upgraded to work in Windows 7, you can simply make copies of all your data files on CD/DVD or on an external hard disk.

5: Plan your data transfer strategy

To move from one operating system to another, you'll probably want to use a transfer program that will scan your XP system, pull out all your data and settings, and then transfer them to Windows 7. Fortunately, the Windows 7 Easy Transfer utility can provide this service for you. However, before you perform this transfer operation, it will be in your best interest to have a separate back up copy of your data (see #4).

The new operating system will come with two copies of the Windows 7 Easy Transfer. One copy will be on the DVD and the other will be installed with the operating system. Before you install Windows 7, you will run Windows 7 Easy Transfer from the DVD and back up all your files and settings. Then, once you have Windows 7 installed, you'll use it to move all your files and settings to the new operating system. You can learn more about the Windows 7 Easy Transfer by reading the article Step-by-Step: Windows 7 Upgrade and Migration on the Microsoft TechNet site.

6: Inventory your applications and gather your CDs

Since you won't be able to perform an in-place upgrade when you move from Windows XP to Windows 7, you'll have to reinstall all your applications that passed the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor compatibility tests (see #1). It will be helpful to have an inventory of all the installed applications so that you can track down all your CDs or compile a list of Web sites for those applications you downloaded.

While the report generated by the Upgrade Advisor will be helpful as you create an inventory, it won't be comprehensive. To create a detailed inventory, you can use something like the Belarc Advisor. For more details, see the article Gather detailed system information with Belarc Advisor.

7: Become familiar with the new UI

The UI in Windows 7 is quite different from the UI in Windows XP, and it offers a lot of new features. As a result, you may encounter what I call "UI Shock." You'll know what you want to do, but you'll experience a momentary lapse of composure as you strive to adapt what you know about XP's UI to what you're seeing and experiencing in Windows 7.

To ease the level of UI shock, you'll want to become as familiar as possible with the features of the new Windows 7 UI. One starting point is Microsoft's Windows 7 page. While a lot of the content here is essentially marketing related, it will give you a good idea of what to look for when you actually move into the Windows 7 operating system.

To help you get right to the good stuff, check out:

You'll also find useful information on the Windows Training Portal on the Microsoft Learning site. Be sure to check out:

  • The Windows 7 Learning Snacks, which are short, interactive presentations. Each Snack is delivered via animations and recorded demos using Microsoft Silverlight.
  • The Microsoft Press sample chapters from upcoming Windows 7 books. Viewing the free chapters requires registration, but it is a short procedure. Once you're registered, you can access sample chapters from Windows 7 Inside Out, Windows 7 Resource Kit, Windows 7 Step by Step, and Windows 7 for Developers.

8: Check for XP Mode support

If you discover that some of the applications you're currently running in Windows XP are not compatible with Windows 7 (see #1) or you just want to keep Windows XP accessible, don't forget about Windows XP Mode. This virtual environment includes a free, fully licensed, ready-to-run copy of Windows XP with SP3 that runs under Windows Virtual PC in Windows 7.

As you consider the Windows XP Mode, keep these things in mind:

  • Windows XP Mode is available only in Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate editions.
  • Your computer must support processor-based virtualization.

You can learn more about Windows XP Mode from the following TechRepublic resoruces:

9: Ask questions

You aren't the only one making the move from Windows XP to Windows 7, so ask questions and share information you pick up along the way. Of course, you can use the TechRepublic discussion forums. But you should cast a wider net.

One good place to connect with Microsoft experts is the Getting Ready for Windows 7 section of the Microsoft Answers site. Another good place is in the Windows 7 forums in the Windows Client TechCenter on the Microsoft TechNet site.

10: Subscribe to the Windows Vista and Windows 7 Report

TechRepublic's free Windows Vista and Windows 7 Report newsletter, which is delivered every Friday, offers tips, news, and scuttlebutt on Windows 7. As we count down to October 22, the day that Windows 7 is to be released to the general public, we will be covering topics of interest to Windows XP users in more detail. You can sign up on the TechRepublic newsletters page.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

91 comments
skolo
skolo

So I did install Win 7 next to Win XP , on the same drive, different partition. How to get rid of Win XP now when everything works fine on my Win 7?

Appmen
Appmen

You may consider to use WET (windows easy transfer) and PickMeApp: two free solutions to migrate from XP to Windows 7. WET may transfer your XP settings to Win 7 while portable PickMeApp tool may transfer programs from XP to Windows 7. PickMeApp claims to support unlimited number of programs.

andy.pateras
andy.pateras

Ok, I setup my workstation to dual boot between XP and Windows 7. I setup Windows 7 the way I want it and created an Acronis backup image. Now I want to remove XP, completely, and configure Windows 7 as the Primary and only OS. Can anyone provide me the directions to do so?

pktxx2008
pktxx2008

In fact, I don't like vista very well. so, the win7 will use more wonderful and conventional? welcome to my web

onclejon
onclejon

I endorse the comment "why" do it. I do not know any large business that want's to move from XP to Win 7. So the answers is to get busy lobbying Congress and pointing out that XP has become a utility and that if Microsoft will not support it others s should be allowed to do so. lets put it in the public domain!

drew.mcbee
drew.mcbee

Why the "h - e - double - hockeysticks" would any it manager in their right mind want to do that anyway?

RadarMate
RadarMate

I gather that Novell won't be supported on 7. Not sure where that leaves users who are tied to this by their institutions.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

I am a keyboard person, I only use the mouse when it makes sense to use it. Imagine my frustration when I found the Start Menu (or whatever it's called in W7) does NOT allow you to use the keyboard to start programs! My fingers are used to hitting Win / p / o / w to start Open Office Writer, or Win / p / i / m to start Maxthon. Each one takes less than a second to accomplish. Try doing that in Windows 7 though :-[ So I wrote a small program launcher that mimics the W98 Start Menu, put a shortcut to it in the real Menu, and gave it a hot-key.

inject_yourself_with_liberty
inject_yourself_with_liberty

oh man... why should we upgrade... XP SP3 works fine, at least for the rest of us here... it's really the time to move on to java and leave visual studio... then we don't have to upgrade...

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

One of the things that chaps my "cheeks" is all the trash in the GUI. All the icons, colors etc. are a pain and slow down the system with all this eye candy. I want a simple, fast interface instead of all the garbage that slows the system. At least in the older systems you could strip out this junk.

dwdino
dwdino

1) Better performance than XP. 2) New UI is substantially more efficient. 3) More flexible for mobile users. 4) Greatly improved backup tools. 5) Greatly improved firewall (up to layer 7) 6) With Server 2008 networking transfers improve. 7) More stable and secure thus far (lifecycle) 8) File explorer is more difficult 9) Some application compatibility issues. 10) Super look and feel... lol Really, if I took the posture of half of the posters in regard to a new Linux distribution, I would be scorned. I recently installed OpenSuse 11.1. I must say KDE and Gnome have changed and I have been fighting my way through all of the annoyances (can't taskbar items stay where I put them?). I am learning and objectively deciding if it is an improvement. I have converted all of my systems to Win7. After vetting a few initial issues and becoming familiar with the changes, I have become much more efficient and haven't had a moment of downtime. The Acer netbook, the Dell M90, the Dell GX280, the White Box. All are running well and my family adapted in about 3 days. I would expect a technical forum such as this to have much more objectivity and weigh the value of each item on its merits, not the preconceived self gratifying legends of yore.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

For #2, a dual boot is extra cost. In addition with Norton PartitionMagic 8.0 being so old and outdated, it may not correctly support Windows 7. Better off with other software. For #8, with the except of the licensing, I don't think it's worth keeping XP Mode unless you know you won't have any other VMs. I'm using a dual boot between Windows XP and Vista x64. When in this setup, you drives will flip. Even if you installed XP first, it will be the "D" drive in Vista and Vista will be the "C" drive. Found one issue which will appear affect users. Seems both Vista and XP will fight over the restore points with one knocking the other out. There is a KB with suggestions on fixing this issue. The nicest setup would be a fresh install, with two partitions. Format the first but leave alone. Install Xp on the second partition. Then install Windows 7 on the first partition. This way, when you kill XP, Vista will still be on the actual first partition.

Zpunky
Zpunky

OMG! What a pain in the A**!!! Really. Leave it to MS to completely reconfigure the profile data structure but provide no clear path or instructions for this critical element of a domain. Hint: Make a backup copy of the current profile directory, add ".v2" to the end of the individuals active profile, and then logon with W7. If you're !lucky! things like Outlook configurations with attached PSTs (not a supported configuration, by the way) will work. But things like customized '.qat' files, those files that provide Office 2007 Ribbon customizations, won't carry over. I pitty anyone who has a large user base to support in this transition.

rcfoulk
rcfoulk

For day-to-day business computing XP is still more than adequate for most all users, particularly in small business settings. The software purchase costs, installation/conversion/migration, retraining of staff and consequent impact on near-term productivity represent costs that are not at all offset by the sizzle offered. Yes, Win7 will take better advantage of newer hardware. But the reality is that most users will be doing the same thing with the same software the day after conversion that they were doing the day before. Office applications (2003 please ... keep that damned ribbon interface) including Outlook, a browser and possibly a SQL app. It's about applications for business; getting work done. New without a real payback for the expense is no deal. And frankly it's just rude to not enable a toggle to a previous interface (in both Windows and Office). Users should determine when or if they care to use a new UI. Such an option would actually smooth transition for upgrades, but no, it's their way or the highway. MS hasn?t yet realized that the computing world has moved on and they don?t have quite the leverage to enforce their parochial view of how the computing world should look.

fedm235
fedm235

You recommend a backup before moving to W7. Will the Windows Backup utility in W7 read a backup created by the XP Windows Backup utility?

connerd
connerd

The tool doesn't work with Windows XP Pro 64bit.

unclwldo
unclwldo

Compatability mode, compatability mode, compatability mode. The only difficulties came with loading drivers for older devices such as a LaserJet 4 and my D-Link wireless USB adapter. The D-Link was, as above, compatability. The LJ4 I simply pointed to the Windows.Old directory & Win7 found and loaded the drivers, worked like a champ. Also, was having difficulty loading on other systems until I looked up the error was to use the DVD R/W drive I used to burn the ISO. That worked. Win7 is very pretty & very functional. If you haven't pulled down a beta, do it. But, have a box you don't care about with plenty of horsepower ie: 40g HD min., 1G RAM, min. 64M video RAM, you'll have a blast. L8R ... Uncle Wally Pop

thall
thall

Good pointers! also- Depending on your method of annual reupping the Security Suite, you might be in for extra expense...

cbci
cbci

When is SP2 expected?

nospam.online
nospam.online

I've installed 32bit on Dell C840, D600, D610, GX270 & GX280 with no issues. Used XP and vista drivers as needed and I've been running the RTM version (VL) since released. Best way I've found to install is make backup of docs/images/files, wipe hdd or repartition if not NTFS, format, install. The C840 as an upgrade didn?t work well at all the first time round but when I wiped it and did the fresh install on NTFS it went great and is noticeable faster. I've also installed it on a bootable drive in my home gamer machine with Asus Commando system board, 2.66 Quad over clocked to 3.4, 8GB ram, 8800 Ultra video and 300GB VLraptor. When I have more "play time" I'm going to try out Halo 2 and Halo server and see how they work. I did notice they have already released a number of patches thru the school WSUS for it. I'm swapping out all drives for the VLraptors so next one maybe I'll try the 64bit version.

Capt_Skippy
Capt_Skippy

Is Windows 7 a server OS or something!? Consider multiboot, plan a backup/restore strategy, become familiar with the new UI?!?!? WTH?!?! I feel like I'm planning a migration from Win2K Server to Win08 Server. Getting a new OS should not be this complicated. Win98, Win2k, even WinXP, never had this kind of preperation involved. Just buy the CD, pop it in, hit upgrade/format and do a clean install, and call it a day. I forsee yet another M$ circus.

wyldwezl
wyldwezl

Just in case you're running some old school servers as we are, Win 7 will NOT easily log in to an NT server (yes, we're still using it). I think it can be done, but it's a terrible kludge. The original first Win 7 download supported this, RC1 and later do not. It works OK with anything using Active Directory, but not an NT domain. Just an FYI . . .

PoppaTab
PoppaTab

Hello, I am surprised that the whole of the IT department have not come to your workstation and beat you with rubber hoses (I'm assuming workstation meant at work). Then again, at work you shouldn't be able to do that. Windows 7 has some very good tools to use. The Easy Transfer tools is very nice to use if you have an external drive. Simply transfer all to another drive and install the RTM and transfer to new computer. W7 also has a very good backup system that will image the drives if you have enough room. Format the system you want to use and run the back up; be sure you have a system repair cd made before doing this. Partition should be #0 for Operating System and #1 for progam files, etc. If you are not set up that way now, Easy Transfer is your buddy.

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

Did you get help with your post? I plan to purchase new PC with 7 within a week from 10/28/09 and have interest in retaining access to XP mode but do not know what processors will enable the virtualization which is what my reading tells me is important to make this goal feasible. This is for use with small business. This laptop is really struggling and no possibility of Windows 7 in it. Looks as though the change to 7 will happen which makes me willing but very hesitant to accept 7. Any helpful suggestions? I am night-owl in EST and huge email volume so please be considerate for anyone reading this. I have left just 2 comments on this site in my life and have no idea what numbers of people read these. Thanks in advance for any helpful suggestions. Considering robust system by DELL or Toshiba and ruled out Sony, with 16-17" screen, mobility not a concern, looking forward to seeing screens side by side and speed! will be refreshing change...technicians on manufacturer sites are no help, they have not heard of virtualization, virtual mode, etc...out of my league here, not PC install savvy so keep in mind in response if I am to understand BYE, S

tom
tom

Because, eventually, support for XP is going to go away.

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

OK, Mr.Technician, you have proven your expertise so please help by telling me what processor I need in order to access XP mode in new PC. I understand processor choice is key for access to virtualization mode in this replacement laptop. If that be true, no one seems to know or is willing to tell what choices will not slam that door shut forever. I need help badly and am not geeky at all. I simply need this to work in small business environment where it will be the single PC in existence. Buying very soon after 10/28/09 assuming I can get this question answered. I know it needs Pro, Enterprise or Ultimate Windows 7 but am aware of nothing beyond that so all details in basic language are welcome from those who know. It will not take much to confuse me so only truthful and reputable responses are welcome for this night-owl in EST. Thanks, BYE S

juntunen
juntunen

I haven't had to fix any roaming profiles yet. I'll agree with the lack of instructions or even a heads-up by MS that this has to happen. By the way, Vista does this as well, so I suppose they think everyone knows this by now.

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

ALL HYPE! In what way does M$ Windows 7 operating system IMPROVE end user processes or the companies bottom line? PLEASE someone QUANTIFY the means to an end here. There is NO reason to buy this GUI OS. NONE. Is it "pretty"? It sure is. Does it do anything better than XP? Nope. This is a marketing ploy and for those dumb enough to spend the millions of dollars to upgrade their company to M$ I pity your poor soul for you have given into the great HYPE. XP is a perfectly functioning OS and will be for years to come. The only way M$ will get true followers is to develope an OS that INNOVATES and changes our processes in a way that effects the companies bottom line.

dethvader
dethvader

Hey Wally Pop When you are finished with your box and the you replenish your cash; we will have a good time. Your Little Deva

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

What extra expense do you reference. I am currently shopping for new laptop with Windows7 and leaving a laptop 32 bit with XP and have strong interest in making certain I have option of using XP mode after purchase. I am having difficulty discovering what processors will enable virtual use into XP. I have read passing comments including various ones which will not be right. That is not much help for me. The technicians are no help at all. I want to purchase within a week from 28th. Fast help is what I need.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

I turn off M$ Security Center because I'm going to install my own choice of AV and Firewall. Guess what? EVERYTIME I boot, I get a pop-up that tells me Security Center is disabled, do I want to enable it? WTF??? I know it's disabled, I disabled it on purpose. But there's no way (that I know of) to turn off the pop-up. Aarrgghh!!

RichardLeuenroth
RichardLeuenroth

Some of us are still go back quite a ways. When I tried to install the toolkits to check hardware compatibility, they were serious about WinXP. Apparently the tools don't work with W2K. Also .NET must be the latest which is not supported with W2K. I Guess that the only solution is to try it first on the H/W and fiddle with it. I too cringe whenever a new software release appears when the old seems to work well enough. The biggest problem I find is getting users to try something new. Most users object to change of any kind. And it's the users who can make or break what you do.

ITCompGuy
ITCompGuy

Windows 7 seems to be a pretty stable OS. I have installed the RC version a few Dell Optiplex 755 and 620's. When the Enterprise version came out I installed on Dell D830 laptop. There are some cool tools and features in the new OS. For support purposes, they have a Remote Desktops tool that I use to connect to most servers and desktops. If you are doing a normal RDP session, Windows 7 will not play well with Windows XP and older legacy platforms. I have a virtual XP machine setup with all of the key support tools that I am able to use when all else fails or for emergency backup if my main machine fails in a disaster recovery type scenario.

randyd@sji
randyd@sji

I remember have a 2000 Server DC and trying to move to XP; not a pretty sight when working in a corporate environment with group policies. The "add-ins" were supposed to work between 2000 Server DC and XP but it just would not pick up all the policies all the time. So now we are being expected to migrate to Windows 7; so what Server OS is the best choice? 2008? Then if this is the case; servers first, clients second?

PoppaTab
PoppaTab

Hello, Barn, you have already gotten the answer about processors. In general; look for Intel with VT or AMD with V because they support the virtual mode you need. Don't hit the panic button on Win 7; it is a decent OS, but study need vs. want. There is a hell-of-a-want win 7 compared to I-need-win 7 out there. I have 3 clients that want win 7, all 10 seat and less; what they need is XP pro which they have been using. For individuals experimenting at home; I say take the plunge. A business I advise use what they have to the fullest extent. It's not that Windows 7 is not a good OS, it is the fact that business must run what is best for their ROI and time consumption. Give the executives their new toy netbooks with win 7 and keep the work stations on XP, for now. Learn Windows 7, you will need to know it and keep current in XP. As for dual-booting; never in business and why not at home.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Yep that's correct but by the same token Eventually we are all going to die so why bother? What is important here is the timing of a change and not rushing in with the expectation that it's new so it's better. Way too many places have been hurt financially with that attitude and some still try it hoping that this time things will be different. The definition of Stupidity is doing the same thing over and over and hoping for a different outcome. It just doesn't happen. :D Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It's the M'Board not the CPU that has to support Virtualization so you need to find a NB M'Board to start looking for not a CPU to get XP Mode to work. You can however run XP as a Virtual Machine on 7 with the provided VM product from M$. So basically if the NB Makes supplies the NB with XP Mode it will and if they do not it is unlikely to. As for which type of OS to use personally I think that 64 Bit is the only way ahead and I can run every app that I have installed so far with the Exception of Quake 4. So basically if Business Software will run on Vista it should run on 7. [b]But that is not a definitive Answer[/b] as 7 is still new and still untested. If this is for Critical Business Applications I would run XP and not be bothered with 7 at this point in time. Problems cost money and time and the business that I support can not afford the first and don't have the second to waste while I see what can be done. So if you want to be sensible use what you are familiar with and allow the others to work the Bugs out of the system and Pay for the Privilege of being what is effectively a Paying Beta Tester for M$. As for the actual Hardware itself yes you are correct it's all 64 Bit now but that doesn't mean that it can not run a 32 Bit Platform. After all since AMD introduced the Atholon CPU about 6 or 7 years ago they have all been 64 Bit CPU's and the Intel Offerings went that way shortly after that point. Intel is currently working in 256 Bit computing which is still years away if we rely on M$ to drive development of our Operating Systems. M$ has had some massive changes since we moved from 8 Bit to 16 Bit and then 32 Bit. They have got big and very Bureaucratic and are no longer capable of making changes on the Fly to meet New Technology Developments. Instead of being able to start new development when something is announced they need years of lead in time now to even begin to look at developing something, then quite a few years more to get it to a acceptable stage where it can be adopted. Did you realize that there is a 64 Bit Version of XP currently available? And it has been available for several years now though it was never widely accepted as useful because of supposedly Driver Issues. The reality is that M$ is still working on how to deploy it in a acceptable manner that will allow people to use it the same way that they managed to with XP 32 Bit. Cheers Col

Devonmcnulty
Devonmcnulty

One reason is:If you reinstall Winxp a lot. you run out of installs

joseph.r.piazza
joseph.r.piazza

Why turn it off....it is the same as before with XP..it should pick up your AVG and firewall. If you have an AVG that does not run in W7 and there are a few right now...the Security center allows you to turn off the warning for that particular application.....firewall or AVG.

tom
tom

The security center is set up to see if you have protection, not provide it. It will tell you if you have AV, Anti-Spyware, and if your other products are out of date, etc. I'm not saying it's a good thing, just that that's why it wants to run.

juntunen
juntunen

I have Windows 7 connections to Server 2003 DC without any issues yet. Roaming profiles, group policies, etc. I started with a test machine and then gave one to a volunteer "guinea pig" in accounting. She actually likes it, no complaints. With the roaming profiles, it will make a copy of the existing one on the server, change it into the Windows 7 structure and call it name.V2, so I guess there's no easy way to go backwards after that. XP won't be able to understand the new one. Other than that it seems fine.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I don't answer questions with this TR Account so I'd have to sign off and log back in. What can I say I'm [b]Lazy.[/b] ;) Well depending on what you actually ended up with loaded it all depends on how you proceed from here. Assuming that it is some version of XP it's a pretty straight forward position just copy your Data & Programs Across using PC Mover this TR Article may be useful if you have not already seen it http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/tr-out-loud/?p=1350&tag=main;wideContent From what I read of PC Mover it seems very simple to use but I have no personal experience with it. :( Col [i]edited[/i] You just have to love the Spool Chocker it changed forward to ford. :D

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

PC arrived today and I have not had the nerve to start it-how is that for confidence! Well, I was sick in bed 2 days and will be better able to deal with surprises tomorrow. Decision was 7 64bit with XP downgrade which Dell offered for the Precision Workstation, (really loaded), base was on a major sale which helped a smidge. I also bought PC Mover with cable even though daughter is IT specialist (neg is that extremely busy schedule is non-stop)but oh, so willing to do the transfer for me. Thanks so much for your suggestion that the last thing I need is to adjust to new OS as well as the long list of new software coming with PC and also more to be installed once the transfer is complete. Also, my websites are coming online very soon (refinement underway) and that is all new also! I never anticipated having this much new going on in the year when I received my Medicare card! This is my new life-entrepreneur with actual and virtual store, websites, social networking (do not enjoy yet)-sales in terms of incoming money is all new to me and I am excited by it but overwhelmed often as well. Thanks again for your help along the way. I started forum question about "Having PC Mover Professional, PC Shipped, Please Help!" which should make all IT professional legitimate users of this site cringe-please tune in and help some more please as I am a very needy and appreciative forum/TR user.

PoppaTab
PoppaTab

Hello, My experience with Win 7 Pro 64bit is running very well and I believe MS Office 2010 is coming out with 64bit applications. Utilize 64 on what ever OS you run and you will be happy. The software makers are making use of 64bit and dual core techs. more now.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Well it does run some 32 Bit Apps. But it's not as good as either Vista or 7 at doing this and there are still issues with Hardware Drivers for 64 XP. If you are looking at Business Applications there most likely isn't an issue but some Games and stuff like that isn't supported by the 64 Bit Version of XP. ;) Col

MPG187
MPG187

At school we now use Windows 7 64 bit and there is a "Program File (x86)" folder. My friend got the printer working. I can print from my Fedora VM, it's 32 Bit, haven't tried 64 bit Linux...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Is available on the Market but if you have not used it previously or know that you can get the Hardware Drivers for it I wouldn't recommend using it. While it is still XP it's not quite the same as the newer 64 Bit Offerings and the reality is that all of the software that you listed is 32 Bit and will be that way for a considerable time to come so there is no advantage of going to 64 Bit unless you need more than about 3.2 GIG of RAM for some intensive jobs. The software that you listed doesn't tax the installed RAM all that much but from past experience I find that XP 32 Bit works best with 4 GIG loaded as 2 X 2 GIG Modules in NB's. You will not use all of the RAM but what is used will be run in Dual Chanel Mode and give the best performance that the NB can supply. Later on when all or even a lot of the normal software is 64 Bit things will make it a [b]No Brainier[/b] to use a 64 Bit OS or at least a [b]No Choice[/b] Option. ;) But right now for Critical Business Apps I would only recommend a 32 Bit OS as it works, is know to work and isn't a problem. Though with some new Hardware there may no longer be XP Drivers available. However on the Driver Front it's easier to get 32 Bit Drivers than 64 Bit Drivers so the 32 Bit Version of XP really is a [b]No Brainier[/b] there. Your welcome to ask any question you like but you need to realize that I'm just offering [i]Personal Opinions[/i] I'm sure that there will be others who may disagree with me. :D Col

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

I knew it-I would leave something out- and not short. You spoke of XP being available in 64 bit but I was not certain whether that is on the market, recommended for me to buy, whether this XP-PC should be 64 bit machine, even if I cannot get 64-bit OS-XP. You see, I have done absolutely no reading on XP as it was my supposition that I was leaving it. My daughters configured this PC and gave it to me. I have never purchased such an item. I can still ask daughter #2 for help and she recognizes that I am far from the total novice of that era. She had gone on DELL site and configured 2 PC's for me prior tp my contact with you but I have not sent her your words of wisdom as yet. When I re-read the very last part of your response, the questions started foaming...fill in pertinent blanks and I will give you peace.

The Old Barn
The Old Barn

I am so thankful to you for the reply to my post which I wrote while under great pressure to order Windows 7 in order to maintain access to XP mode for the laptop computer which would become the single computer for my small business. (I DID buy a netbook 2 years ago when just out, thinking that as long as I would put all files on an external drive, it would serve as a backup for those times when there are problems with the laptop-that was a failure as it filled to capacity anyway and my support company cannot take anything else out of the NB). Your response which first gave the essential information about how to accomplish the purchase if it would be 7, then quickly got right to the more appropriate issue which speaks to the fact that I truly do NOT have the time to be held up by bugs in Windows 7 and would never usually decide to buy a computer when the OS has just been out on the market a week. It was the outside world and my internal thoughts of what should be rather than what is wise, which was pushing to read everything available to prepare myself, etc... It was partially through reading all these words of wisdom which made these complex issues seem reasonably manageable for my world. Of course, most people on your site have formal computer science education which I lack. When the complexities of those bugs or simply the intricacies of 7, being new, do not work quite the way they are supposed to work, these people would not have as much trouble as I would have in getting out of a bind. Aside from whether or not it would take me longer to figure out, as I have been madly printing out one helpful commentary after another, preparing myself for the inevitable, now I am thrilled by your very astute response which makes it obvious that it is another decision which makes more sense! As you described MY situation, the pressure which had seemed so intense, lifted and I knew that anything but an XP computer would be an error. Thank you very much for your thoughtful response. You summed it all up very succinctly and it has had a major impact on my life. I still have not found the computer as the sites really are motivated to sell the Windows 7 items. All the sales that were found in abundance when I was biding my time until the 22nd have disappeared. I will just need to be forceful but I will succeed and will be happy with the choice. I will use that computer for quite a period of time and I know that your words will return to me often as I am pleased with the PC. Some of my friends think I am crazy and I know that I am making the correct decision without a doubt. One daughter of mine is MCSE and of course think that it is all manageable but it will be mine and I need something different for now. Thank you so very much.BYE S It will be adjustment enough to switch from Office 2003 to 2007, Quicken upgrade as well as other new bookkeeping software, probably Quickbooks, without including an untested OS. I did not know that it was the MB which was the issue rather than the processor which was essential as well as the processor in maintaining the access to XP. I had invested a huge amount of reading without hearing anything beyond the processor choice as being key to the usability of the feature. I thought that I had done sufficient reading and listening to videos, to prepare me for the correct questions but fortunately, I had not been able to determine which processor or I may not have asked you for your help. That point is now moot and I thank you for your fast response. Your "first things first" spoke in a very authoritative manner to me before I ever had a clue what the message was to be. This will make my world a more pleasant place to live for quite awhile. BYE Sandra-wishing I knew your ID

bobp
bobp

What is the freeware called? Thanks.

shumaker
shumaker

which one are you referring to?

blarman
blarman

I hate it too. Fortunately, there is a neat little freeware app that reverts the menu back to the standard XP one.

nospam.online
nospam.online

I setup one office lady with a D600 running Windows 7 and Office 2007 and the main school program "School Minder" with about same experiance, only no one likes the "ribbon" menu of Office 2007.