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10 things you should know before buying a Galaxy S III smartphone

If you're thinking about buying a Galaxy S III, be forewarned. This phone offers some incredibly cool features -- but you'll want to factor in a few gotchas.

When it was time to upgrade from my Galaxy Nexus (in part because my husband was anxious to get my hand-me-down), the choice seemed obvious. I liked the Nexus a lot, but there were a couple of things I didn't like about it. One biggie was the lack of a microSD card slot for expanding storage. I also longed for even more screen real estate than I got with the Nexus's 4.65 inch screen (which includes the onscreen buttons). Finally, the camera quality on the Nexus, although much better than many phones, wasn't up to what I had come to expect from my previous (HTC) Androids.

The Galaxy S III seemed to fulfill my wish list, and more. With a gorgeous 4.8 inch Super AMOLED screen (and the buttons beneath the display so they don't take up any of that space), microSD support, and a reportedly excellent camera, it was my dream come true. Or was it? I got my S III more than a week ago, and I've played with it enough to discover both some pleasant surprises and a few gotchas. If you're thinking about getting an S III, and especially if you're trading up from a Nexus, here are a few things you might want to know to help you make the decision.

The good

First, let's look at a few things you might not know about the S III that will come as pleasant surprises.

1: MicroSD on steroids

You probably know that the S III, unlike the Nexus, has a microSD slot so you can add storage space. What you might not know is that it isn't limited to the 32 GB maximum card capacity like most phones. Not only does it support microSD and SDHC, it also supports SDXC, which have a theoretical capacity of up to 2 TB. Transfer speed is also faster.

The Galaxy S III specs say it supports up to a 64 GB card, but it's unclear whether that's because that is currently the largest size available or there is a software limitation. In practical usage right now, you can add a whopping 64 GB of storage to the S III for around $55.

2: Motion controls

The Nintendo Wii popularized the concept of interacting with an interface via motion on a gaming device, and Microsoft's Kinect took it to the next level and expanded it from the game console to the PC. Now Samsung has brought motion control to the phone, in a big way.

There's a whole set of gestures you can use with the S III that you won't find on the Nexus or most other phones. You can double tap the top of the device to go to the beginning of a list. You can tilt the phone forward or back to zoom in or out of a picture or Web page. Simply by placing the phone to your ear, you can call the currently displayed contact. You can shake the phone to update (refresh a Web page, rescan for Wi-Fi devices, etc.). You can pan (move the phone left or right or up or down) to move around a large onscreen image. You can briefly pause a video or mute sound by placing your hand over the screen.

If you don't want your phone doing things because of the way you hold it, don't worry. You have to activate the motion feature in Settings before you can use these and other built-in gestures.

3: Pop-up Play

This was another pleasant surprise. It works like the picture-in-a-picture feature on TVs. A limitation of smartphone screens has been the inability to display more than one app at a time. With the tiny screens of the past, it just wasn't practical. With a screen this big, it starts to make sense. The Galaxy S III doesn't go as far as I'd like in this department (side-by-side display of any running apps would be awesome) but the Pop-up Play feature does let you play an HD video in a small window while you use another app (email, Web, etc.) on your phone.

4: Camera bonuses

I care about the camera quality in my smartphone, because I take a lot of impromptu photos. Sure, if I know I'm going to be taking pictures, I'll load up one of the high-end Nikon DSLRs -- but often, I'm out and about with no intention of playing photographer and I want a phone cam that can give me a decent shot of that once-in-a-lifetime photo op.

The Nexus was a big step forward, with its quick shutter, but the pictures weren't always as sharp as I wanted. Part of that was "operator error" -- it's hard to hold a little phone steady as you tap the onscreen button. That's why I prefer hardware buttons. Well, the S III doesn't have that, but it does have the next best thing. You can delay the shot after you tap, giving you time to steady the phone/camera, or you can use S Voice to take the picture (just say "cheese"), so you don't even have to tap at all.

There's more to it than stability, though. The S III provides an 8 MP camera in contrast to the Nexus's 5 MP, and noise levels are lower, too. Photos simply look better, especially those taken in low light. And videos are sharper and more fluid.

There are some interesting shooting modes. In addition to the (now fairly standard) smile detection and panorama, there's a "beauty" mode that automatically smoothes facial features, a "cartoon" mode (that I've not found very useful) and "buddy photo share" that will use facial recognition to match up people in your photos to the pictures of your contacts and automatically send people pictures of themselves. A nice bonus is that you can edit the shortcuts to make it more convenient to get to the controls you use often.

Another photo feature might not matter a lot to the average phone user, but for those of us who write about phones, or to a lesser extent IT pros who support phones and may need to remotely demonstrate to a user how to configure something, the ability to take screenshots of the phone's display is important.

Once upon a time, getting a screenshot on an Android device was surprisingly difficult. Some phones had to be rooted before you could install screen capture software. Some of us even resorted to taking pictures of the screen with a camera (which presented the challenge of dealing with the glare on the glass).

Samsung made it a lot easier with the Nexus: You could do it by pressing and holding the volume down button and the power button simultaneously. You had to do it just right, though, or you might end up turning the phone off. With the S III, taking a screenshot is as simple as swiping your palm across the screen. Amazing. If you want to illustrate how Android and its apps work, this is the phone for you.

5: Great phone

A problem with some smartphones is that they're heavier on the "smart" than on the "phone." That's okay if you want to use your device primarily as a miniature computer, but if you plan to talk on it a lot (or even a little), it's nice if it also functions as a better-than-average phone.

The S III does. Call quality is crystal clear, and you can customize it with personalized equalization settings. This feature actually tests your ears with different frequencies and tones, measuring how well each ear hears them, and creates an equalization curve for each ear.

But that's not all. The whole calling experience has been improved. Lots of phones let you set custom ringtones for different contacts, but that doesn't help if you have the ringer turned off. The S III lets you set customized vibrations for different contacts. How cool is that? You can also answer (or reject) a call by voice command, and you can set up a rejection list to automatically reject those numbers you never want to hear from.

If you leave the phone app to go back to the home screen to check mail, look up a contact, or whatever, the status bar turns green so you won't forget you're in a call. Can't hear the caller? There's an Extra Volume button on the screen during a call, that lets you increase it beyond the maximum you get from pressing the up/down volume hardware key. There's even a key to let you create a memo from within a call.

The not-so-good

These are some cool features, and there are more (such as the Siri-like S Voice application that goes way beyond Google's voice search) But the S III still isn't quite the perfect phone. Here are some of the not-so-good things I've encountered in making the transition from the Nexus.

6: Speaking of that microSD card

It's great to have the extra storage space of a massive 64 GB card, but what exactly did you want to do with that space? If you only wanted to put your pictures, videos, music, etc., on it, no problem. But if you thought you'd be installing apps on it, think again. The S III doesn't support moving apps to the external microSD card, as you could do with most previous Android phones.

It can be done -- by rooting the phone and using a third-party app, such as links2sd or Directory Bind. But many folks don't want to root their phones because it voids the warranty. The 16 GB version of the S III has about 11 GB available on its internal storage disk (sd). That's probably enough app space for most people, but some are going to run out of room.

7: No USB mass storage mode

If you're upgrading from an older (pre-ICS) Android phone or you got your start with Windows Mobile, you're probably used to being able to plug your phone into a PC via USB and seeing it pop up in Windows Explorer as a hard drive. Unfortunately, the UMS (Universal Mass Storage) mode that enabled that isn't supported in the Galaxy S III.

Apparently, you're supposed to use the Samsung Kies app instead. That's going to make a lot of people unhappy; it requires installing software on your computer (like syncing an iPhone via iTunes or a Windows Phone 7 via Zune -- ugh), and it's slow as molasses. Sure, it has an "easier" interface that those moving from an iPhone might like. But many Android users prefer power and more control over "simple."

The alternative to installing Kies is to use MTP (Media Transfer Protocol) or PTP (Picture Transfer Protocol) mode. This has advantages (you can still use the phone while it's connected to the computer), but it's not as easy to use. If you're willing to root your phone, you can use an app like Easy UMS to enable USB Mass Storage. It would have been nice if the S III just supported both UMS and MTP/PTP.

8: S Voice tries hard, but...

Samsung's answer to Apple's Siri suffers from some of the same problems I've heard iPhone users complain about. It works fine for simple things (and I do love that ability to use voice to trip the camera shutter), but it gets easily confused if you ask it to do something complex. Making a call by voice takes me three times as long as doing it the old fashioned way, since you go through the "found more than one match" business. Trying to search the Web with it proved to be a bit of a pain. And it seems to get frustrated with you when you don't like its results and keep trying -- it froze up on me a few times and I had to kill the process.

Voice recognition is getting better, but in my opinion it's not ready for prime time yet for most uses. I'm sure my Texas accent doesn't help. If you're getting the phone primarily for this voice feature, prepare to be disappointed (or maybe not, if you have a perfect Midwestern non-accent that it can understand).

9: Missing photo options

Even though there's a lot to love about the S III's camera, there are also some things I miss about my Nexus camera. Mostly, I miss the great editing tools that were built in. You could adjust the brightness and contrast, add a vignette, and achieve all sorts of additional effects right there in the camera.

With the S III, unless I'm just not finding it (in which case they should make it a lot more obvious), the only editing options are to crop and rotate. Sure, I can download a photo editing app, but that involves extra steps. I really liked the simple but comprehensive set of editing tools in the Nexus. This isn't a deal breaker, but it's something that's good to know when you're considering the switch.

10: Wi-Fi connectivity problem

Overall, despite the small complaints above, I was immediately impressed with my Galaxy S III and loved using it -- except for one very big problem. It was blazing fast and reliable on 4G, but I soon noticed that Wi-Fi was just plain wacky. It would load a page quickly, and then the next page would take forever and/or time out completely. S Voice would give me "Network error. Try again." messages. The Facebook app would give me "Connection Lost" errors. Often.

My old Galaxy Nexus (now my husband's) sitting right beside it, connected to the same wireless network, had no such problems. I started researching and found out this is a fairly common problem with the S III. There is a fix that works for some, which involves going into service mode and turning off power saving in the Wi-Fi settings. It doesn't work for everybody, though, and if you discover the problem during the return period, I'd recommend taking the phone back to the carrier and telling them it has a defective Wi-Fi radio. Although a number of people are reporting this problem, it seems to be a small percentage, so your chances of getting another one with the problem are low. Still, the possibility that you'll encounter this is something to be aware of if you're thinking about getting an S III.

Additional reading

Your thoughts

Have you used a Galaxy S III? Share your experiences with fellow TechRepublic members.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

109 comments
Janebrendan
Janebrendan

I precisely wished to say thanks yet again. I am not sure the things that When i could possibly have done in the absence of these creative concepts revealed by means of people over this industry. It actually was the difficult crisis in my position,

lagarwal55
lagarwal55

wi fi  concetvity problem in my mob.phone

david252
david252

Also there is a setting in the camera app to enable the volume keys to function as either a zoom or shutter release.  


A fantastic phone.  Beats the iPhone hands down.  I think Apple are struggling to keep up with the mobile phone competition these days, let alone stay ahead of it.  And this comes from a die-hard Apple fan (I have an iMac, mac pro, iPad air,2 Apple TV's, macbook Pro and have had the 3GS and 4S to prove it!)



david252
david252

I've only had this phone 1 week too, and it's taken me most of that time to explore all of it's functions and I still haven't covered them all (and I'm retired with not much else to do all day!).  I am moving from an iPhone though, so I do also have a steep learning curve to negotiate with Android at the same time.


Liked your article but would just like to point out one flaw that I've noticed, not sure if anyone else has mentioned it, the ability to transfer apps (at least third party ones) to the sd card does exist:  Go into settings>General>Application manager - click on the app that you wish to move and it will give you an option to "move to sd card".


Love the phone and the android OS, after getting used to it.  Took me a while to figure out that Google play Music works just like iTunes Match for syncing and downloading music stored in your iTunes library (and the standard version is free - unlike iTunes Match that charges £20/year for the privilege).


The ability to personalise the phone and it's settings in Android seems infinite compared to iOS.  Marvellous.

Scooterjffj
Scooterjffj

I have ths SIII and it hooks Right up to my pc ....Rooted and unrooted it works GREAT... The cons she speaks of i have no problems with it !!!! Getting the new SIIII tomarrow

Sage_
Sage_

"You can pan (move the phone left or right or up or down) to move around a large onscreen image." Oh my god, that is bizarre!! I had a dream that this was possible on this phone. I've never even used an SIII or a high end smart phone ever. Never seen an SIII in person except in shop windows. In the dream someone I knew had the phone and used the function, I thought it was cool and said I'd buy one after seeing that. I feel like I need to buy one now hahah.

atish nis
atish nis

i think thats not gud mobile if we compare it with its compititors ......n ur point of view is tooo awesome.... if any body want to see other compitative mobile information as well jst visit http://mobileinindia.in

thequeen86
thequeen86

honestly i hate the phone my husband is in school for being a phone tec and it was hard for hm to root and then once we did i had the phone for 2 months and then the wifi quit working t wont even turn on it says my mac address is missing i can deal with that i got full 3g signal now my phone keep on goin to boot mode and then it will get stuck in boot load mode. i have had to factory data reset my phone 3x in a week how anoying so my opinon s im getting a new phone,

agnes james
agnes james

I have my own Galaxy S3. It was working nice. But after sometime it used to create some problem in wifi connection, Was not working. I had checked my router setting also but the problem was in handset. But now I am glad to say that i got a solution which worked great for me at http://howmobile.net/samsung/2291-wifi-problem-galaxy-s3.html and I thought that I should also contribute from my side to help people Who having the same problem I had. Hope The given procedure will work. Thanks!

Atharton_CB
Atharton_CB

To me this article seems more like pro iPhone, it has comparisons with iPhone in many places, I wish you also write about positive of using Samsung Galaxy s3 over all other smart phones(Not just iPhone). Athar

GSG
GSG

I just got this phone a few days ago, and had only minor issues with number 7. I plugged it in via USB, and while it was not recognized on my XP workstation, it was recognized on my Windows 7 workstation. I was able to easily transfer music files from my workstaiton to my phone. I've had only minor issues with WiFi, but it's similar to what I've seen on my android tablet, but not as bad. I'll turn on the wifi and it doesn't seem to recognize a signal, so I turn it off and back on, and it's running fine. An annoyance to be sure, but a relatively minor one compared to my android tablet.

kashguy
kashguy

I still love my nexus better because i have the pure google experience and as for space everything is uploaded on google so what do you need space for? Voice commands work awesome on Nexus with Jelly bean...oh yeah S3 has no jelly bean and is running the ancient ICS OS on it. I got Jelly bean pushed to me 2 months ago and it changes everything for the better. I will wait for another Nexus device before going S3. Don't get me wrong, its a great phone but I just love my custom Nexus car dock with 3 pin connection so I don't ever have to plug a cable in.

farahijahromi
farahijahromi

I am not sure why someone that only has one week S3 experience should even think of writing a detailed review of pros and cons. I can understand if the review was about how it feels, how it looks but this one was an absolute failure. At least the author should have read some other reviews and technical specs before publishing this review and then trying to correct the review mistakes in comments. This article should have been published in MythRepublic not TechRepublic.

masters_robert
masters_robert

Encountered issues viewing photos received via text message. If there is text included, they appeared as a video. After a couple of hours with Tech Support at both Verizon and with Samsung, I was told that was a feature and a Android Operating System issue, but it only happens with Samsung phones. Resolved it by using Handcent for messaging.

T3CHN0M4NC3R
T3CHN0M4NC3R

I didn't know TouchWiz 4 has added so many functionality but I have a permanent scepticality towards TouchWiz so I rooted my wife's unit and installed MiUi onto it. Although I did that I don't seem to experience anything about the WiFi connectivity, perhaps you should send your unit to your nearest Samsung Support Centre. About battery life, I think it applies to all smartphones but I kinda managed to fix them by installing custom Kernel and downclock it using the app SetCPU. And you have to manage what you sync and be aware of apps that actively give you advertisement in your notifications.

Ventaur
Ventaur

Ice Cream Sandwich is the culprit for the mass storage mode issue. Even my Galaxy S2 had this issue after updating to ICS. Connect your phone to a PC via USB, if you're having this issue you'll see a notification titled "Connected as camera...", touch that notification to change the type of connection to "Media device (MTP)", browse the phone as mass storage.

deb
deb

Since writing the article, I've discovered the Samsung Photo Editor that can be downloaded from the Google Play store. It is a pretty decent little app that supports many adjustments and special effects (I mostly wanted to be able to adjust exposure, contrast and color sat, but it does a lot more) and best of all, it integrates into the Gallery so that you have the Edit option from within a photo when you click on the picture in the camera app immediately after taking it. Maybe this comes preloaded on other carriers' phones but was not there on my Verizon model.

ed
ed

1. The phones provided by different carriers are not the same. They have different groups of software (bloatware) installed and different features disabled and blocked, so the phones may behave differently in those areas and these might even affect other usages. 2. The phone service in different areas where I live differs greatly. Something that works great at my home may not twenty miles away, and vice versa. So sometimes it's not a defective phone or even a defective user that makes a difference.

A-mantra
A-mantra

I use Samsung galaxy note. I was really worried when Samsung launched S3 as note technology is going to be outdated but when I compared both these devices, I really feel very relaxed as both technologies are like two different segment and they can't be compared.

CreamingSoda
CreamingSoda

Three things... 1. The SIII DOES support mass storage onto the phone and SD card 2. It DOES support moving apps to the SD card. 3. WiFi issue? I'm positive this is not a common problem with the SIII. All I've sold haven't had this issue Most of your bad points are invalid. GG

peter.stephens
peter.stephens

Interesting article. I moved from a HTC Desire to the Samsung and found the hardware spectacular but the software not as intuitive as the HTC which was a real breeze to get a handle on. Having used the Samsung for several months now, have worked out where settings are and it is great. USB mode works fine for me on Win7 Pro. Also no issues at all with WiFi, in fact the WiFi performance has been really good for me. Could it be your router? As a suggestion I would ensure I checked on forums etc before presenting your experience of the device as a definitive reflection of the specification or performance. Inaccuracy on such things don't reflect well on a professional blog.

performall
performall

I have an SII rather than the SIII, but it was a recent, long-overdue upgrade from my Blackberry 8900. From a performance and features standpoint, it is a huge step up. Nevertheless, I assume the SIII has the same or better features as my SII, but the principal caveats I offer to anyone making that jump are these: Be sure and turn off your applications (including email and messaging) when you're not using them. I never worried about that with the Blackberry, but with AT&T, at least, those programs remain active on the SII and probably SIII in the background and chew up data from your plan. Further, don't succumb to the temptation to set the phone to check for messages/email constantly - same problem. Unless you have an unlimited data usage plan, this can get expensive.

mcquade181
mcquade181

You forgot to mention another not-so-good. The Galaxy S3 uses a micro SIM. This might not be a problem for people migrating for an iPhone, but for the rest of us, particularly those of use with multiple phones, it is a real problem. I can see why Apple sued Samsung - Samsung copy everything, even the bad stuff like the stupid micro SIM idea. The bloo#y things are so small you need tweezers to handle them!!

trog7
trog7

My daughter has the Galaxy S III, and has experienced a few traumatic episodes of data loss. The phone has a photo edit tool, and she had been playing with this on a couple of pix of her children, when she later went to access the photos, the originals and the modded ones had completely vanished. I ran some data recovery tools over the SD module and only discovered a few pix she had purposely deleted - but not the folder of pix she had wanted to keep. And , no the Samung KIES app was also useless . Also it appears the Galaxy S III has a problem with the SD card slot. Have purchased a couple of different brand SD modules and only after a couple of days, it is showing errors trying to access the SD card.

Gisabun
Gisabun

1) Anything is better than using bloated iTunes! 2) With the issues Siri has had, you can't really complain that S Voice ain't great. At least [well sas of today, maybe not Wednesday] S Voice is a released product. siri is still listed as beta on the Apple web site [yes fanbois and fangurld, you are a beta tester for Apple and not paid for it - you are poaying].

GeoffA
GeoffA

If you think your Texan accent is a problem, you should try my Western Australian one with this and other voice recognition systems!

paulf
paulf

Agree with all the reviewer said, like all phones it has the odd problem for me:(1) Could Samsung put a slot in for the second simm card, the galaxy is so good I would like to use the one phone for both private and business? (2) please please give us a better loading computer to phone system other than Kies!. Why not have Bluetooth on Kies after all the phone runs Bluetooth! You need to be able to walk near the computer and it automatically updates. Also I have difficulty with the Kies system isolating all my email addresses and downloading them on to the phone as separate to my normal addresses, frustrating! Yep battery only lasts a day but with usb facility to charge I have plenty of options.

etherkeiffer
etherkeiffer

are you sure ? Samsung devices require that you select the mode before connecting the cable, after which you need to confirm USB storage mode (as others have mentioned). As far as the wifi probs are concerned, are you using a Dlink router ? Have you tried a different wifi network and get the same wifi probs? If yes then you might have a faulty device ? I've not checked to see if this is a known fault with the SGS3. My Nook Color has the exact same wifi probs with my Dlink router but works fine on every other network. I added a Belkin wireless gateway to my network and the problem disappeared.

smorris
smorris

I am looking at S III for my phone but have not seen anything on video connections like Iphone (my kids have this). Any suggestions on what to use for compatibility and/or S III connections?

davidwaf
davidwaf

90% of the time i have this phone connected to WIFI and have never had any problems with WIFI connections. I totally disagree with your '....noticed that Wi-Fi was just plain wacky'.

dmurrell
dmurrell

The Verizon manual says "By default, files that you download, or that you create with your device, such as pictures and videos you capture with Camera, are stored to your device’s memory. For more storage capacity, you can set the memory card as the primary storage location for apps with the app’s options." Could have sworn we verified this on a guys S III here in the office.

dean428
dean428

This is a well-done article. I would have to say that my experiences in several of the areas you talked about have been different. I don't have the problems with the web pages, nor do I have to use Kies to connect to my Windows 7 Home computer or my Windows XP computer. I have had it for nearly 6 weeks and myy battery life is good if I keep it on the power saver mode as well. These differences could be due to the user more than the phone itself.

bwexler
bwexler

I have the Verizon Nexus. I find the antenna is very weak in fringe areas, where I spend most of my time. In a strong 4G area it works fine. In a weak 3G area nothing. I have to revert to my old Alias to make a voice call and my USB 720 for internet. The Nexus was supposed to replace both. Is the S III any better? Why doesn't any one review the the ability of these phones to actually connect. That is the MOST important feature of any phone, to me.

gh4tech
gh4tech

Debra...I think I will keep my Galaxy S2, as it seems to do all that you wish the S3 doesn't do.

pwitt
pwitt

Ive noticed my S3 gets less cell reception than my wifes phone. She has a droid4, both on verizon.. In talking with verizon, I havent been to get a solid answer why, but they are blaming the cell towers needing to be upgraded in some way, but that doesnt make any sense.

HeavySnarker
HeavySnarker

I'm with DaveTR. I haven't seen any problems with accessing either the sdcard or extSdCard folders on my computer in USB mass storage mode.

dibblee
dibblee

Emails pile up; I think I have 300 or 400 that I haven't bothered to delete. Emails have to be individually deleted; you check the box & can do multiple screens at once but it's a real pain. They need a checkbox for "select all".

tim.gates
tim.gates

The Samsung Kies doesn't require you to install anything on your pc. You enable it on your phone and goto the url and port it assigns, then are able to access the phone via your browser. It is only accesable on your private wlan. I've used it and seems fine, can be slow if the phone is busy. I also use an app called Light Flow. Pretty cool, it displays different color LED Notification lights based on the app .. so for example, gmail produces Green LED, Blue when bluetooth is on. I agree S-Voice is weak, but it's the same engine as Siri (vlingo). Try Robin for voice asst (like s-voice and siri). The Google Voice to txt asst also works great .

mchinsky
mchinsky

Yup, you must be doing something wrong. Plug the phone into my Windows 7 64 bit and it automatically shows up with 2 'drives', one for internal storage, one for the internal SD Card. Svoice does stink. Actually most voice activation features I've tried on most phones isn't as efficient as homescreen shortcut options. That being said, the new Google voice to text keyboard is awesome

tjmason
tjmason

WRT USB: The phone works for me as a USB drive. I can push files onto it and pulls files from it. No problem. WRT WiFi: I have not had any problems with WiFi. It sees networks that my iPhone 4 didn't and connects without a problem and without dropping.

kingkong88
kingkong88

I assume it's still there. It was on my Galaxy S II and now on my Galaxy Note. You don't need a cable. Just turn on wifi and all you need is an Internet browser in your PC, or even the browser in another phone! This will allow you to navigate and access all the files and folders in your phone.

Flicky Licky
Flicky Licky

S3 Fanboy here. Its a great phone but gestures are just stupid, as is asking your phone dumb questions that you could type into google just as quickly and far more precisely. The flip to mute is the only gesture of any use to anyone I know. Pop up play, not found a use for it yet, too small. As a photographer I've tried most of the camera / post apps. Stick with stock, easily as good as anything else and way better than most. I've settled on Photoshop Express to manage the images and upload them to adobe.com, You can manipulate in the app but you will get astounding results using Lightroom 4, forget trying to render new images with no grunt, you're just jumping on an overcrowded and very droll bandwagon. WiFi is fantastic, best I've had. I can get a signal when the ipad is scanning itself flat although a Nexus 7 I saw was even better than the S3 - bargain of the year that surely. I use Airdroid to transfer files, no point using a cable. Connects in less than five seconds and is very fast

Scooterjffj
Scooterjffj

@thequeen86I have ths S III and it hooks Right up to my pc ....Rooted and unrooted it works GREAT... The cons she speaks of i have no problems with it !!!! Getting the new SIIII tomorrow.. Oh and its not hard to root matter of fact rooted mine in less then 30 Seconds... Not a custom  rom Just rooted Thier is no need to change the rom I feel because it runs smoothly now !!! And when i rooted I lost nothing the phone came back as i had it set up ..remarkable phone sorry but your tech person must not be that tech savey

deb
deb

That the phones work differently depending on carrier or location. But the Wi-Fi problem IS a defective phone - it's been reported with different carriers and all over the country, and there was no trace of the problem on the replacement phone I got, which also doesn't get nearly as hot as the first one did.

deb
deb

So since I did have Wi-Fi problems, I should totally disagree with your statement that you didn't? :) It's a known issue; even the Verizon rep was aware of it and exchanged it immediately. Second one is just like yours: never any problems with Wi-Fi connections.

archienj7
archienj7

Check the forums, hundreds of posts on it. I had one myself which they replaced no questions asked as soon as I told them what was wrong. A batch with bad wifi got out. You can disagree but it doesn't change the fact it's a reality. Be glad you got one with no wifi problems.

deb
deb

But you can't install apps on it or move apps to it.

deb
deb

But I had no problems at all with 4G/3G or with voice. Wi-Fi was the only problem and now that I have a non-defective phone, that's fixed.