Hardware

Ten reasons not to fix computers for free

Do you feel like a heel if you don't want to fix computer problems for friends and family? Here are some of the reasons you shouldn't feel guilty.

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Like most IT pros, I have had plenty of friends and family members ask me to fix their PCs. Although I have always tried to help people whenever I can, I have come to the realization that with a few exceptions it is a bad idea to fix people’s PCs for free.

Don’t get the wrong idea. There are some people that I truly don’t mind helping. I would never refuse to help my wife with a computer problem, nor would I cut off my mother. Unfortunately though, the majority of those that I have helped have abused the situation. As such, this article is a list of ten reasons why I don’t recommend fixing PCs for free.

1. Future problems are your fault

When a friend or family member asks you to fix their computer, they do so because they do not know enough to fix the problem themselves. Because the person typically does not understand the cause of or the solution to the problem, they probably also are not going to understand which problems are related and which are not. As a result, anything that happens to the computer after you touch it may be perceived to be your fault. All the computer’s owner knows is that the problem did not occur until after you worked on the computer.

2. People may not respect your time

Before I stopped fixing computers for friends and family, I had a big problem with people not respecting my time. Friends would call me at all hours of the day or night and expect me to drop whatever I was doing, drive to their house, and fix their computer right then.

3. Things sometimes go wrong

The third reason why I don’t recommend fixing people’s computers for free is because if you break it, you bought it. I have never personally run into a problem with this one, but I do know someone who brought a friend’s laptop home to fix, only to have his three year old daughter knock the laptop off the table and break it.

4. People don’t value things that are free

People seem to be conditioned to accept the idea that the best things in life are those that are the most expensive. This can be a problem when it comes to fixing people’s computers for free, because your advice might be perceived as carrying no more weight than anyone else’s.

To give you a more concrete example, there is someone in my family who constantly calls me with computer questions. I try to be nice and answer the questions, but often times this person does not like the answer. In those situations this person will tell me that my brother, my aunt, or somebody else in my family with absolutely no IT experience told them the opposite of what I am telling them. Inevitably, this person ends up ignoring my advice.

5. They expect free tech support for life

When you fix someone’s computer for free and you do a good job, you can become a victim of your own success. The next time that the person needs help, they will remember what a good job you did. In the future you may be asked to assist with everything from malware removal to operating system upgrades.

6. People adopt risky habits because they are getting free tech support

This one might be my biggest pet peeve related to helping friends with their computer problems. If a friend or family member assumes that you will always be there to bail them out when they have computer problems then they have no incentive try to prevent problems from happening. As such, they might adopt risky habits or even do some things that just do not make sense.

I will give you a couple of quick examples of this one. I have one friend whose teenage son infected his computer with all sorts of malware while trying to find free adult content on the Internet. The infection was so bad that it took me all weekend to fix. I suggested to my friend that he either keep his son off of his computer, or only allow him to access the Internet through a hardened sandboxed environment. A few days later my friend told me the infection was back. After asking him a few questions, I discovered that he had given his son the admin password so that he could “download something for school.”

The other example was that I once did a hard disk replacement for a family member. I won’t bore you with the details, but the hard disk replacement was anything but smooth. There were issues with everything from BIOS compatibility to the physical case design. After spending all evening working on it, I finally got everything working. By the time that I arrived home I had a message on my voice mail from the person whose computer I had just upgraded. She said that she had let her eight-year-old son disassemble the computer because she wanted him to learn about computers, but he couldn’t figure out how to put it back together.

7. It doesn’t end with computers

Another reason why I don’t recommend doing free computer repairs for friends or family is because the job might not end with computer repairs. Once the person figures out that you are good with electronics they may have you working on other things. For instance, I once helped a neighbor recover some data off of a failed hard disk. Two weeks later he had me on the roof helping to realign his satellite dish.

8. Things can snowball

Sometimes when you fix a friend’s computer for free, the expectations of free technical support can snowball into free support for everyone. I once fixed a computer for someone in my family. When I was done, the person told me that they have a friend who is also having problems and asked if I could look at that too.

9. Your service isn’t just free, it is costing you money

For instance, you are probably spending money on gas to drive to your friend’s house. You might also end up using supplies such as blank media or printer ink. I have even had friends who expect me to supply them with the software licenses.

10. Fixing computers is too much like work

The best reason of all for not fixing friend’s computers for free might be that doing so is too much like work. If you spend all day at work fixing computer problems, do you really want to deal with the same thing when you leave the office?

What is your policy on volunteering your tech skills for friends and family?
216 comments
Bronxboi
Bronxboi

I have stopped fixing computers for free.  For my dad and one other person, yes, I will do it, for others, no.  I got sick of people disrespected my time and also trolling around my work area to see what "free" upgrades they could acquire.  Now, my rate is 50 per hour and I do not bend.  I actually have lost a few "friends" but guess what they were just using me anyway.

I have an analogy that I use with people and it is, "If you have an auto mechanic over for dinner, do you ask him to go out to your garage and work on you car for free, no, then don't ask me either". Peace.

timh0722
timh0722

This  is all so true.  In my youth when I was growing up in the 1960's, my Dad and I repaired TVs and we rarely got compensated by anyone for a successful fix.  We didn't ask for compensation but it was apparent no one wanted to pay either.  My Dad was getting ready to retire and wanted to start a TV repair business and wanted me to go into it with him.  I chose a different career - IT (they called it Data processing then) and have never regretted that decision.  The TV repair business was dying out, and solid state TVs were coming and the economics for throwing it away and buying a new one were starting to become apparent.  Much like the PC world is now.  Now that I am ready to retire and looking for something to do, I can see no real potential for IT support at the consumer level.  Unless its part of the warranty, no one wants to pay for a repair and either find a friend to work on it or  talk themselves into buying a new one. 

timh0722
timh0722

I agree with this.  Limit your help to just immediate family.   With that said, one time my father in law calls me from Palm Desert as he was having trouble with connecting at the local library WIFI.  After I got him squared away, he then asked if I could help the fellow next to him who was having the same issue..LOL.  I did and then a couple of more came forward next to him as well.  After I got these folks squared away, he later apologized and we had a good laugh about for it for years thereafter.  He and my mother in law were really the only people I supported like this and I never felt abused since they were very generous with us. But never the less, I could see a very unpleasant aspect for this kind of thing.  Best to be careful in agreeing to help anyone. 


Rick_R
Rick_R

NONE OF THIS IS NEW. Before personal computers were available I worked as an electronic technician at various factories working on a variety of product lines -- guitar amps, chemistry lab equipment, ship-to-shore radios, etc.

It was the same thing back then. You're the "electronics genius" because you know how to use a soldering iron. Once you TOUCH it "you own it". Free support for life and anything that ever happens to it short of it getting hit by a car is YOUR FAULT AND YOUR PROBLEM.

Electronic techs learned early on an told all the newbies: NEVER do free repairs except for your ABSOLUTE CLOSEST relatives.  All the above reasons are the reasons why.

sperryr
sperryr

This post is so on the money, it strikes a raw nerve with me.  I am a Mac person, so  anyone who owns a Mac expects free tech support.  I love her dearly but the biggest offender is my wife!  Help me fix that one! !!!  I actually had to show her that the reason the computer wasn't working was because it was not turned on! 

TurtleCzar
TurtleCzar

Poor Kennywalker.  He wants so desperately to live in a communist utopia.  Too bad they all fail to a one.

allanroger
allanroger

You are right, Brien, People take lot of advantage if you offer them something free which they are not worth of.  Why should we do it for free? We can tell them to contact remote support professionals who will fix their computers using tools like Logmein, RHUB, GoSupportNow, Bomgar etc.

Treknology
Treknology

1. The Doctor and the Lawyer


At a social function, the Doctor laments to the Lawyer about people using his social time to ask work-related questions. The Lawyer replies, "I answer their questions, and then send a bill the next morning." The Doctor thanks him, and two days later, receives the Lawyer's bill in the post.


2. Self-service checkouts.


I won't use these on principle. There are six or seven staff all encouraging you to self-checkout. Do I get a discount? (No) Do I get minimum wage? (No) Listen mate, If I'm going to fight with a computer, I don't even get out of bed for less than $80 an hour. Now get behind a register and do something about keeping your own job!

mihai77www
mihai77www

You might want to try another strategy - delay the fixing (you don't have time) and when you do it never do it as it should :))) You will get off the hook :P   Let professional people to do it like http://smartfixpc.com or someone else and live your life. :) 

boxaid
boxaid

Yes we get tons of phone calls at http://boxaid.com with fed up relatives who are sick of fixing everyone's computers for free.  They would even prefer to pay for our service instead of having to do the work.  The last thing you want to do is fix a computer when you fix them all day for a living.

Kennywalker
Kennywalker

This post is hurting some good Samaritan heart.What's wrong in helping someone somebody for free.The world would be a better world to exist if everything is for free.

HunterBonner
HunterBonner

This article so true and frankly on all counts.  I worked for a firm that everyone just seemed to assume that if they were having problems with their personal machines at home, they could just bring them to the office and get free tech support.  I catered to this for just a short while, but then I had enough.  Even when the owners of the firm were doing it, they just assumed "Well, I'm paying your wages, and you should help me on this."  Uh no, sorry, that is not in my contract.

I actually got bold enough and would tell them, after them telling me what's wrong, that I could work on it, but I will have to do it when not at work and on my personal time.  I would then tell them that I would cut them a deal on the price.  Once I did that once or twice, the inquiries stopped.  So the author is right.  You are losing money when you do this, along with your valuable time.  Also, people expect free tech support, and I'm sorry, it's just not going to happen.

jedikitty
jedikitty

I can relate the most to points: 2, 4, 5, and 6, but point 5 was driving me nuts; every time my beloved baby sister, or my nephew would have computer problems, I would get a call - weekdays, weekends, very late evenings...  I used to help out a lot, including full reinstalls, or rebuilds.  But it came the time when I finally realized that I'm spending so much time on their "needs" that I deprive myself of time for my husband, my dogs, even the "me" time.  

So, after getting yet another "uh, I'm having this problem with my computer, can you call me as soon as you get this" kind of a call, I called back to say sorry, I won't be working on your broken computer anymore.  You should hear the guilt trip that was laid out on me really thick, how heartless and selfish I am for "leaving them in the cold", how can I do that to my nephew (I'm also his godmother).  I almost caved in.  Almost.

Then the calls stopped! :)  However, now every time I call my dear sister to chat, sometimes the computer problem just materializes right during our phone call, and I end up stepping her through the fix.  Makes me wanna not call her in the future, but then I feel like I'm neglecting my "sisterly duties".  Damn if you do, and damn if you don't...

jeff
jeff

First 4 are very true and it happened to me real life.

gino
gino

From me it comes in 2 categories: 

1) Advice: This is most of the time free if you ask for it. But you take it or leave it, I don't explain or defend my advice you asked for.  If you don't ask for advice you won't get it.


2) Tech support: I don't charge money, but I don't do tech support unless you are on a very short list of people including my wife, my children, my parents, my wifes parents and a handfull of friends.  The rest of the family, and other people can get advice (see 1) but no Tech support. 

This comes exactly from the following reasons: 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 (I luckily never had the "things go wrong" point).

replytoaghar
replytoaghar

lol very true every single word :)

However, don't you think that people should have some ethics & know there limits??

I mean ask me once, twice & I will all heartily help but, I'm not your B!TCH

hbagonza
hbagonza

You are right i experience the same especially co-workers, family members and friends. some come even with their mobile phones and other electronic gadgets for you to repair at no cost.  i have learnt now not to give a free service.  HENRY

Tokinabo
Tokinabo

I know someone who decided not to charge but to make the problem worse!
The rumor was quickly spread and now they leave him alone ;-)

adi518
adi518

Btw, I have a funny story... with good ending!

I was on this island in Brazil, it's called "Big Island" and the local internet cafe had a workstation that had a technical issue where the mic wouldn't work. Now obviously, the owners lost money on that one as people couldn't skype on it (which is what most people do in an internet cafe). I then offered to apply my skills and fix his problem (which turned out intermediate, not exactly simple fix). He said I'd not pay for the session so I agreed (internet rate on the island was very expensive). Upon fixing it, which took 2 hours, he didn't believe it finally worked again! He actually said he was told "he needs to replace the entire computer". He then decided to reward me with free internet access whenever I want, for the rest of my vacation on that island. He actually said "for the rest of your life whenever you come here", but I sufficed for those 7 days on the island. :D

T-Wrench
T-Wrench

Daruka,

I don't have Win7 ultimate, but I do have the home edition, (64 bit), and with Windows update set to auto, my laptop reboots at least once every 1-2 months. The only reason I know, is because it's password protected, and after shutdown and restart you have to enter the password.

So is it possible, that maybe your Win pc has rebooted, and you don't know?

If you mean rebooting on your own, then I can certainly understand, as MS has done a great job, and there's no way I'm giving it up for Win8! Win8 is a good system, but for my current situation, I have no reason to go and spend money on new software that I don't need....

Thanks...

TW

adi518
adi518

This is so true. I was done with it couple years ago when I stopped taking shit from people, including my own relatives. I explained to them very clearly that as much as they want free support, a 100 others want it too so I can't do it and I need to eat too, hence It must be paid. Since then, pretty much no problems. It also keeps the freeloaders away because those are the ones who never want to pay anyway. You have to show some nerve and don't be a sucker, even if you're 15 years old.

PhilippeV
PhilippeV

I sometimes provide help, but frequently I tell how things could cost, and try to evaluate or them these costs so that they choose their solution provider for what they really need and what missing things they can ignore or live without.

As much as possible I will avoid moving to their home. If they realy value their computers, they'll have to come, or pay postal costs, or value their wait time : if they cant(t wait, they can buy or use something else in the interim. Most often, things are not a question of emergency. These people, including in family, should wait and take normal rendez-vous.

My time is as precious as theirs, even if this is in my leisure time (and probably even more, when these persons have put a high value in their own leisure time, they should respect mine as well !). Also there are lots of things that these people can also do themselves, notably taking some efforts to read the documentation, and only then ask questions for things they don't understand (but they can ask these questions online in decidated forums. If this costs them too much compared to buying a new product, they will simply decide not fix their problem, and theur won't need or value my past effort trying to help them.

jollygrn_74
jollygrn_74

The funny thing is that this goes for all things, I am an electrician/PLC tech and believe me I have been offered up for free service and called on numerous times for 'advice' which is readily ignored if not what person wanted to hear and yeah I've fixed a few PCs up for family to have it all go to crap anyways because they keep repeating what caused it all. Great to help out a person but as above can turn out crappy with no real credit for efforts put out.

I have learned as well to charge for services too. Some have taken that pathway and actually it worked out better cause they respect fact that you are doing them a favor (discounted rates) still but keep it in hand cause it is still costing them and everybody except one exception has come out just as happy as any for it all and they understood that any issues was legitimately theirs (6mo project turned into 2yrs)

heckle
heckle

Work on immediate family pc's only. This includes Mother, two sisters who rarely call for help, and in-laws (who the techie wife takes care of). Nobody else. Not for free, not for pay. Just don't do it! I am at a point in my life where I do not do ANY side work at all. Those days are long gone for me! :)

markkavanagh
markkavanagh

Always, always, always charge.... I found this out the hard way too. I had a friend who constantly called me looking for help, advice and repairs when he messed up his Pc, which happened a lot. He was a very good friend, so I never charged him.

This friend was a carpenter by trade and I once asked him if he could help me lay a timber floor in my new house. Without hesitation he said yes.... Great, I was delighted. There was quite a lot of floor to be laid. We got the floor finished over 2 weekends. I bought him lunches, dinners and supplied refreshments while we were working, just to say thanks.

I checked the mailbox a few days later and there was an invoice from my friend for €1,000 for his services. I didn't even call him or try to contact him in anyway. I simply sent him an invoice for all the computer work I did for him, charged an hourly rate which added up to be well in excess of €3,000, applied a discount to make it €1,000 and attached a note saying "This should cover it".

seorsa10
seorsa10

I am NOT an it professional, I over see some IT projects, and being of a technology minded disposition I tend to get drawn into these things. Because technology is so integrated wiht my work and personal life I like to help out. Especially older people who often get sucked into these "Help Desk" call center scams. My parents NEVER call me, and the day before a cross country trip they got one of those scam websites (iyogi.net) and were about to pay 350 to "recover" their yahoo contacts. Luckily I was driving them to the airport so they spuilled the beans when I checked in. Needless to say I pointed them in the direction of yahoo and password resetting.  I don't mind helping because anything past the basics I can at least guide them to an appropriate paid professional.  I have a hobby repairing and rebuilding bikes. I will work on anyones bike for free, just the cost of parts. A six pack helps. I also know the limits of my toolshest and my skills...so I avoid a lot of trounle that way. I never excpect a tech person (especially one that works for me) to help me with a non-work problem, and certainly never for free. I will occaisinally pick their brains....

Adrian Watts
Adrian Watts

You absolutely have to charge something as it is human nature not to value that which is not only free but means they can sit there and do nothing. It all comes down to time, if I spent x many hours fixing your pc you need to compensate me in some manner, either monetarily or by saving me time on something like by doing my gardening (I really don't like gardening or cleaning house). The smart people reason that by paying me they can call on me again.

My typical rate is about 150% of my salary rate, which is still lower than any business would charge. And i'm a known quantity and quality. The only people I don't charge anything are my parents, sibling, and one friend, they already have plus balances. And when I recently fixed that friends fathers laptop when said father really screwed it up (no keyboard, networking, and only basic windows resolution) I asked nothing and still got a couple of cases of beer.

I use teamviewer extensively and say that if I can fix something remotely I only charge for the time i'm actually doing something, if i'm running a scan i walk away and it is counted as free time.

The only times I have done any computer work for free is when I personally want to figure out a problem or challenge myself (said laptop being a case in point, can I fix a laptop without access to its keyboard). I then make it perfectly clear in advance that they are getting the curiosity discount.

egakdo
egakdo

Excelent! I couldn't stop laughing for a while.

Absolutely all the reasons I felt hard on my skin and head.  :))

Maybe, I could add another one, I think you all met too. Not the hardware or software stuff, but the way any user should learn him/herself to use the browsers and their buttons, the way to play a game and so on. I do have "friends" who are calling me each time they do not understand how to use/play etc something.

At last, I told them (almost everyone) do not bother me again for these reasons, unless they pay for my effort ... Of course, the numbers of calls reduced dramaticaly ...  :)
mijcar
mijcar

Of course I help my own family members, unless it's a job I prefer to pay someone else to do.

Close friends or colleagues get a once-in-a-long-while access depending on the nature of the job.  If I get a nice cake or invitation to lunch or even an honorarium out of it, then I extend their access.  If not, the next time they call I tell them what my time is worth or a reliable place to get help if they consider my rates too high.

If I don't have the time or the job is too onerous, I tell them up-front.  If they persist, well, I refer myself to the last sentence in the paragraph above.

giuseppeurso
giuseppeurso

first grade relatives, which reduces the chances to my dad only :)

ErnestScribbler
ErnestScribbler

Good list.  I've been victim to all of these, yet I continue to give help for free.  More than anything else: (1) choose your clients wisely - both paying and pro bono - and (2) be able to set boundaries.  The best defense is to be good at saying "no" to some clients and "no" to some client's requests.

I had one elderly neighbor whom I helped (clearing cookies and reinstalling a printer driver) where reasons 1, 5, 7, and 8 all apply!  15 minutes after I left her house she got a call on her home phone - a wrong number!   She figured that I must have posted her home phone number or the web!  Needless to say, I politely decline her continuing requests.

jbarrett
jbarrett

I think this problem is somewhat universal. If you know anything about IT your friends and family think you are their source for free tech support. When you work for a church, believe me it's much worse. Everybody thinks their friends or family and therefore entitled to free tech support.

I haven't encountered every one of the situations in this article, as well as a few choice others. For example, people leave their computer and after examining it you find it cannot be fixed will just tell you, "Oh well keep it anyway. I'll just buy a new computer." At one point my office and several of these donations. Which leads to the next thing, the cost of repairing that you absorb. Fortunately, holding on to those old computers did supplies certain parts I didn't have to pay for. That did however, lead to people thinking I had everything there was and if I asked someone to pay for a part they often became offended. It seems that free IT also came to mean, "parts included."

My pastor and I finally had to come up with a solution because it got out of control. I looked around in the local community and found several shops who repair computers. I found out what they charge for a service call and advised anyone asking for technical support that my charge was $15 more then what they could get taking it to the other store. In every instance I had more experience than the other stores and felt this was a fair deal. I was really not looking for work, rather for a way to dissuade them from asking me to do it.

You cannot imagine the Irate offense they took the first couple of times I told people that. As a matter of fact, several took it to the pastor to try to get him to make me change my mind and do it for free. After all was in either technology pastor at the church and didn't that mean they get all their technology problems handled for free? Weren't they surprised when he told them it was his idea that I start charging?

It didn't take long for it to spread through the church that my services were not free and now I'm very rarely have someone asked me to work on their computer for free. As a matter of fact, I almost have no one asked me about technology at all anymore... and I don't miss it a bit.

That would be my advice to you if you don't want to work on everybody's computer. Find out what the local rates are and charge at least that much. After all your services are worth something.

kitowa
kitowa

Yep.  I no longer do freebies except for immediate family.  I don't even like to do paid work for friends or friends of my family members, because then I end up being tech support for their screw ups afterwards.

This incident is from about 10 years ago, which was the last time I did a freebie for anyone outside the family.  I upgraded a computer for a friend of a family member.  He brought it back a few days later. He had taken the video card out while the computer was on, and tried putting it back on. Naturally, he fried it. He wanted to see what would happen.

I said, "Well, you found out.  And you're fired!  I'm not fixing your stupidity!"  He whined for a couple weeks after that, but I refused to waste any more of my time with him.  He wasn't my friend to begin with, anyway. 

People have left computers with my family for me to fix.  Nope.  I have a life, and I get to decide what I want to do with my time.  They get mad, but better them mad than me.

cnieves
cnieves

fantastic piece.  it was like reading my life story.  but now I have my break to mention something:

People don’t value things that are free

this bothers me the most to no end.  if you are not going to believe what I say,  why do you ask? do you want me to tell you the truth or do you want me to tell you what you want to hear?  I find this one disrespectful to the core.  believing an non IT person because it is telling you what you want to hear. 

People may not respect your time

oh this one is a biggie too.  people think they own you! specially your family.

kenwd0elq
kenwd0elq

@Treknology

@TreknologyNo, no.   Here's the right joke.


A doctor asks a lawyer "What are your fees?"    The lawyer replies, "Five hundred dollars for three questions."


The doctor thinks for a moment and says "That's pretty expensive, isn't it?"   The lawyer replies "Yes it is.  What's your third question?"
sperryr
sperryr

@Kennywalker  - how naivé - There is NOTHING in this world or in life that is free.  An example would be; if you help someone with no expectations of receiving anything in return, you are sacrificing your time.  This may sound harsh and cold to a naivé person but it is a fact and a law of nature!

Kennywalker
Kennywalker

@jeff  what if he/she helped you with their best without a penny??

Tokinabo
Tokinabo

@replytoaghar Some people have ethics. They really do. But parasites don't!
And as soon as you refuse to help them anymore, they just 
shrug and search for another victims. No shame, no nothing they have...

erenismoh
erenismoh

@adi518 Everything is on google every tech can do such thing with Mr.Google ahehe :)

PhilippeV
PhilippeV

@jollygrn_74 We can "charge" our family on some way. For the time spent fixing their problem, we can ask for services for things that take us time ! If we won't drive to their home, we can ask them to come and help doing work in household clensing or in the garden. These services should not be delayed ("You will help me in the future") because there will be no contract and no real evaluation of the time spent.

Also we have to limit the rime spent answering to phone calls (thanks my ISP will stop any call after 2 hours ! At least this help these people to realize the time spent when I could not do anything else, or could not sleep).These people should earn to summarize their problem, think about what they really need, discard some non essential options they had before the failure, or find other ways to have these options in the new tool they wanted to buy anyway !

Consider the short lifetime of any computing device, when you have problems with it, it's already months after the purchase and if people ask us for help, it's because the device is no longer warrantied or supported by the manufacturer, so it's already very late with more current standards: the solution to fix their problem is more expensive and uses much more time than buying a new product (the only thing lost is data, but people must also learn how to use data backup solutions and should accept that some non precious data wi be lost or will be recovered very late as they don't need it immediately : e.g. their family photos of their last holidays may be recovered months later and only a few of them will be more valuable, the rest will just be garbage ; music and video files have lower value, once you've seen/heard them once so you can still see/hear them online or on radios/TVs)

But let's not forget that outside our own paid employment, our best value is the time spent with our nearest family living with us in our household : they need our care, and they want that we share equally our work charges for the household. Also they don't want to be disturbed everytime by strangers (when they were supposed to be with you respecting their quietness, and with whom you should also have time to speak and share your experience of life).

adi518
adi518

@markkavanagh what a piece of shit that guy is...

Garreth49
Garreth49

@jbarrett I too have suffered from the customers who want it done for nothing and, when I find what the problem is and give them a call with an estimate to get it fixed, they do the just keep it, I'll buy a new one even though they know that I sell new machines too!  I now invoice everything (except immediate family) and make it clear that there is a $100 labor charge for diagnostics.  That stopped all the B.S.

jedikitty
jedikitty

@Tokinabo @replytoaghar And, in my case, when you (finally) refuse to yet again fix a close family member's puter, they will try really hard to guilt you into helping them.  They will also stop talking to you altogether if you don't give into said guilt trip.  Oh, well, at least now I don't feel like I *have to* fix it.

erenismoh
erenismoh

@jedikitty Haha i really really agree with you i always get the same thing when i have to say no to them.