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The 10 best IT certifications: 2012

The certification landscape changes as swiftly as the technologies you support. Erik Eckel looks at the certs that are currently relevant and valuable to IT pros.

When it comes to IT skills and expertise, there are all kinds of "best certification" lists. Pundits are quick to add the safe bets: Cisco's CCIE (Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert), Red Hat's RHCE (Red Hat Certified Engineer), and other popular choices.

This isn't that list.

Based on years of experience meeting with clients and organizations too numerous to count, I've built this list with the idea of cataloging the IT industry's 10 most practical, in-demand certifications. That's why I think these are the best; these are the skills clients repeatedly demonstrate they need most. In this list, I justify each selection and the order in which these accreditations are ranked.

1: MCITP: Enterprise Administrator on Windows Server 2008

I love Apple technologies. The hardware's awesome, the software's intuitive and their systems make it easy to get things done fast while remaining secure. But it's a Windows world. Make no mistake. Most every Mac I deploy (and Mac sales are up 20 to 25 percent) is connected to a back-end Windows server. Windows server experts, however, can prove hard to find.

IT pros who have an MCITP (Microsoft Certified IT Professional): Enterprise Administrator on Windows Server 2008 accreditation demonstrate significant, measurable proficiency with Active Directory, configuring network and application infrastructures, enterprise environments, and (if they've chosen well) the Windows 7 client OS.

That's an incredibly strong skill set that everyone from small businesses to enterprise organizations require. Add this line to your resume, and you may be all set to find another job should your current employer downsize.

Honorable mentions for the top spot include the MCITP: Virtualization Administrator on Windows Server 2008 R2 and MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator on Exchange 2010. Microsoft Exchange owns the SMB space. Virtualization initiatives are only getting started and will dominate technology sectors for the next decade at least. Administrators who can knowledgeably navigate Microsoft's virtualization and email platforms will only grow in importance.

2: MCTS

Not everyone has time to sit as many exams as an MCITP requires. The MCTS (Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist) certification is among the smartest accreditations an engineer can currently chase. As mentioned above, it's a Windows world. Adding an MCTS certification in Exchange, SharePoint, Virtualization, Windows Client, or Windows Server will strengthen a resume.

There is no downside to any of these MCTS accreditations. Each of the above tracks provides candidates with an opportunity to demonstrate proficiency with specific technologies that organizations worldwide struggle to effectively design, implement, and maintain every day.

3: VCP

Virtualization is all the rage. It makes sense. Hardware manufacturers keep cranking out faster and faster servers that can store more and more data. Tons of servers sit in data centers using just fractions of their capacities. Virtualization, which enables running multiple virtual server instances on the same physical chassis, will continue growing in importance as organizations strive to maximize technology infrastructure investments.

VMware is a leading producer of virtualization software. Tech pros earning VCP (VMware Certified Professional) certification give employers (both current and future) confidence they can implement and maintain VMware-powered virtual environments. And if you talk to the techs responsible for maintaining data centers, you'll frequently hear that VMware remains a favorite over Microsoft's Hyper-V alternative, although most sober IT pros will have to admit Hyper-V is improving and closing the gap.

4: CCNA

The next politically correct certification to list is the CCIE (Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert). However, that's a massive exam that few professionals realistically will ever have an opportunity to obtain. And while Cisco equipment frequently composes the network backbone, fueling numerous medium and large organizations, most organizations don't need a CCIE and don't have the resources to pay one.

That's why I believe the more fundamental CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) certification is a smart bet. A CCNA can help technology pros better familiarize themselves with the network OS's fundamentals, while simultaneously strengthening their resume. Particularly motivated candidates can proceed to earn a CCNA Security certification, as the network security focus is a critical component of enterprise systems.

5: CSSA

In early 2012, Dell announced its pending acquisition of SonicWALL. There's a reason Dell is buying the hardware manufacturer: SonicWALL has made great strides within the SMB unified threat management market.

Someone needs to be able to configure and troubleshoot those devices. The CSSA (Certified SonicWALL Security Administrator) certification not only proves proficiency in installing and administering the company's devices, certified professionals receive direct access to tier two support staff and beta testing programs.

Organizations are always going to require network devices to fulfill firewall, routing, and threat management services. SonicWALL has carved out quite a bit of market share -- so much so that it will now have the marketing might of Dell helping fuel additional growth. Knowing how to configure the devices will help IT pros, particularly those who support numerous small businesses.

6: PMP

Too many chiefs isn't an IT problem I hear or read much about. Instead, it seems there's a lack of IT pros capable of sizing up a project's needs, determining required resources and dependencies, developing a realistic schedule, and managing a technical initiative.

The Project Management Institute is a nonprofit group that administers the PMP (Project Management Professional) certification. The exam isn't designed to earn a profit or motivate IT pros to learn its product and become unofficial sales cheerleaders. The PMP certifies candidates' ability to plan, budget, and complete projects efficiently, on time, and without cost overruns. Those are skills most every medium and large business needs within its IS department and such ability isn't going to be replaced by an app or third-party developer in our lifetimes.

7: CISSP

If you want to specialize in security, the (ISC)² (International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, Inc.), which administers the CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional) accreditation, is your organization. Its vendor-neutral certification has a reputation as one of the best vendor-neutral security certs.

Organizations' data, networks, and systems are increasingly coming under attack due to the value of personal, corporate, customer, and sensitive proprietary information. So individuals who demonstrate measurable success and understanding in architecting, designing, managing, and administering secure environments, developing secure policies, and maintaining secure procedures will stand out from the pack. In addition, the knowledge gained while earning the certification helps practitioners remain current with the latest legal regulations, best practices, and developments impacting security.

8: ACSP

There's more to the energy surrounding Apple than pleasant tablet devices, intuitive smartphones, and a stunning stock price. The company continues chewing up market share and shipping computers at rates 10 to 12 times greater than PC manufacturers.

The ACSP (Apple Certified Support Professional) designation helps IT pros demonstrate expertise supporting Mac OS X clients. Engineers, particularly Windows support pros and administrators increasingly encountering Macs, will be well served completing Apple's certification rack for technical support personnel. Benefits include not only another bullet for the resume but an understanding of Apple's official processes for installing, setting up, troubleshooting, and maintaining Mac client machines.

9: Network+ / A+

Yes, CompTIA's Network+ and A+ designations are, technically, two separate certifications. But they're both critical certs that test absolute fundamentals that every IT pro needs to completely understand.

In fact, there's an argument to be made that all IT pros should have both of these accreditations on their resumes. CompTIA is a well-respected, vendor-neutral (though vendor-supported) organization that continually develops and administers relevant certifications. The network, hardware, and software skills tested on the Network+ and A+ exams are basics that every self-respecting tech professional should master, whether they're performing budgeting tasks, deploying client machines, managing site-wide migrations, overseeing security, or administering networks and servers.

10: CompTIA Healthcare IT Technician

With an aging population, U.S.-based IT pros (in particular) should consider earning CompTIA's Healthcare IT Technician credential. Obviously, if you work in manufacturing, the credential may be a stretch. But manufacturers frequently lay off staff. And many others produce material for health-related purposes.

See where I'm headed?

The interest surrounding health-related technology is almost unparalleled. Look around the city where you live. During the recession, where have you seen growth? Are there lots of new bookstores opening? How about new single-family home developments? Seeing lots of new manufacturing centers?

Doubtful. Like many, you're probably seeing new medical services offices, immediate care centers, hospitals, outpatient facilities, dental practices, and similar health-related businesses.

They all need IT support. Support technicians, administrators, engineers, managers, and especially consultants who want to position themselves well for the future will do well to demonstrate their proficiency with health care technology's regulatory requirements, organizational behaviors, technical processes, medical business operations, and security requirements. IT pros could do worse with their time, that's for sure.

Other certs?

What certifications would you add to this list? Share your suggestions with fellow TechRepublic members.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

146 comments
ciscohite
ciscohite

I was wondering how none of the Linux certs made to the list. This is quite surprising but again nice list... Free Exam Simulators

hareeshkp06
hareeshkp06

 Hello,

 I am currently working as a systems engineer on one of the legacy system called as HP Open VMS which is a server OS and basically I manage the server and the OS from an admin level and my experience is 2.9 years. Since the OS is a legacy one.I would like to have some certifcation on the server /admin side. Could you please suggest should I opt for Windows or for RHEL and which has more value in IT .

It would be really helpful if I can get a valuable suggestion
simigr8spirit
simigr8spirit

I believe you should also have the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) certification on this list. I would also consider a couple other certs from the ISACA organization like CISM and CRISC. Additionally, with the significant increase in the Credit card space, I would argue that the PCI certifications are also very much needed today for anyone in the card services space that supports controls.


Not to side track, but it is very important to realize while certifications are nice to have and may give notice to others that these individuals at one point in time have knowledge in a specific space, it does not tell you if they are apple to communicate and share their knowledge well or actually implement something effectively.

It is a plus when comparing two very similar individuals with like skills and experience and may also get an individual through the door for an interview.


My question for the larger group is (What are the certifications that you associate most with people you would hire and why?)

Thank you,

gr8spirit

Joeyolive1
Joeyolive1

LAWL! A+ and Network+.. PFFT! People who has those Certs can't tell me the difference between RJ-45 and an RJ-11 jack.

tolusameri
tolusameri

Even though Redhat should be a good certification. It is not readily accessible to as many as would love to obtain the certification. At least not to us in Nigeria. And RedHat's contact mails have not been helpful either in providing support and information necessary as to acreditted partners.

brajmohan
brajmohan

Appin technology lab , started a new program in the world of ethical hacking. It has started a three year graduation in cyber security. Student after 12th can opt for their career in cyber security. It is a diploma course in information security and ethical hacking. It’s the first time in India that a diploma course is provided in Meerut at company’s level to have a career in cyber security. APPIN TECHNOLOGY LAB is world’s 5th largest IT Company which is providing this opportunity for 12thies.

NickRomedios
NickRomedios

I think this list would be incomplete if Scrum Master Certification is not included. Scrum is the most widely used technique for product development in the IT industry. Almost 80% of the IT companies in the world use Agile out of which 65% follow Scrum. [ul][*] ·http://www.scrum-master.info[/ul] has a comparison of various Scrum Master courses.

SCRUMstudy
SCRUMstudy

You missed Scrum and Agile certifications. These are gaining wide spread acceptance in the IT industry. These help in getting good jobs and also salary. Scrum certification is offered by SCRUMstudy, ScrumAlliance and Scrum.org. To know more about the Scrum and Agile Certification courses visit: http://www.scrumstudy.com/index.asp

josephyadav
josephyadav

PMP training in bangalore with 100% Pass Assurance!!!We offer Certification Preparation training of PMP in Delhi, Bangalore, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Pune, Chennai, Gurgaon Get best price quotes fromProject Management Certification Training Programs.The 2 day PMP Classroom training will be taken by certified PMP trainers, who will interact with the PMP aspirants and explain important aspects of the Project Management in relation to the prevailing condition in the Project Management field. Workshop Dates in Bangalore 04, 05 & 06 January 2013 Location: The Shelton Grand, #73, M.G. Road, (Entrance Church Street), Bangalore 560001. For Details visit: http://starpmo.com/pmi-pmp/bangalore.php http://www.starpmo.com/ or Call us: 08686679444(Archana)

sidahmed
sidahmed

The Google Apps Certification Program is for IT professionals who sell, deploy, administer, and support Google Apps.

shilpa naidu
shilpa naidu

how about ISTQB certification in the field of testing????

pmseck
pmseck

What about the Oracle certifications ? There are plenty of it, but is Oracle BI EE a good one, or should one rather go for a non-brand--specific BI cert ?

dude714
dude714

I am a current student in the CIS field, and this was a great article for me. It shows me some of the many certifications and also reinforced what some of my professors have said about them. Healthcare is gonna be a hot field, and I was also shocked to learn that the A+ and Net+ aren't that popular. I do agree about Citrix, as our school uses their system in our library and other areas.

JasonTRunner
JasonTRunner

Any IT managers advise in here - I'm up for a promo to IT manager, and looking at the ideal certification to complete next year. Any IT managers in here got a suggestions / advice that combines certification around technology and new management training? Also - any suggestions for 2013 certs?

JasonTRunner
JasonTRunner

Reviewing a plethora of certifications now available, I've come to the conclusion the certification area is now a business - a revenue cash grab for these technology companies. How valued are they or relevant they are....constant upgrades to keep you coming back to stay relevant. Sometimes I wish I were in a different industry.

jenniferyoung1212
jenniferyoung1212

CompTIA is pretty good for beginners who want a break in the IT industry. There's a computer technician training at CareerStep that can be completed in a self-paced program format. I hear that vouchers for the test are included in their program as well. http://www.careerstep.com/

StevenDDeacon
StevenDDeacon

TechRepublic is Microsoft centric i.e Linux is bad for business. I'm really surprised that VDI is not on the list. Virtual Desktop Infrastructure is going to be a hot ticket occupation with the advent of cloud computing and smart mobile devices. Not too many VDI "experts" out there. And many will learn how to do VDI the hard way. Big impact to networks/clouds and the Internet. And some applications are not VDI compatible. Benefits with VDI are improved maintenance, security, collaboration, and backup logistics, and minimal support overhead for nodes. Cons are big network hit, lost session recovery, and front-end investment costs are very high. Buy in requires new networking hardware infrastructure, middle-ware costs, new node hardware and software licensing costs, and new server and storage investments.

teksuccess
teksuccess

I realized that Cisco certifications are in very high demand, but Microsoft is still a top player. The newest MCSE (Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert) certifications will cover newer technology like cloud computing and virtualization. It focuses on Microsoft's newest Server operating system. I still believe that when a candidate shows up with an MCSE or MCSA for Windows server 2003, they still grab attention. After all even though the new MCSE is 5 exams, the old MCSE: 2003 was 7 exams and that shows some dedication of an individual who went through those sleep-less nights.

jamer02
jamer02

I wonder why ITIL is not listed. I though Information Assurance was a hot item right now.

Jeffwii
Jeffwii

I believe the new MCSA and MCSE certifications for Server 2012 will start to be invaluable within the next 1-2 years.

NBGKBN
NBGKBN

PMP? Really. My company, the company I own, actively rejects PMI/PMP (PMI Need Not Apply) in favor of senior BA-types with an understanding of how technology works, not how management functions. GE, IBM, MS,... I've been employed by them all and none recognized PMP as a valuable certification. In fact, we work with GE at the highest level and have enjoyed PMP jokes. How do you spot a good PM? First, that person is probably too busy to spend time/money on a certification I accomplished in a weekend (literally,... a book, a weekend and we both passed the exam - this ain't a Microsoft cert). Second. Respect and membership. The PM's spreadsheet should have useful artifacts, not mundane milestones (screen names, table design). How about Business Process Identifiers and valuable milestones. I also pimp out a few dozen developers. Every PMP has "User Screen" on a spreadsheet. I'll say it again and one day I'll certainly be justified: "PMI Need Not Apply".

RajeGera
RajeGera

I would like to know the must certifications for 3-4 yrs of Dot Net experienced professionals.I am good at coding and developing the systems but want to shape up my career in management/consultancy area.

ddevida
ddevida

TestOut Corp. new NetworkPro and PCPro certifications are also very good.

mail2hemant
mail2hemant

If you haven't included the Cloud Certification, you are missing the hottest trend in the current IT market. Cloud and Big Data are on the top of organizations in 2012 and will get more steam in 2013.

TimothyGaladima
TimothyGaladima

ITIL and CBAP are hot in my country at the moment. I'm surprised these are not on the list. -Tim

jsadhu
jsadhu

I don;t see any mention of CSM, CSPO, CSP or PMI-ACP. Giving how more and more processes are adopting agile - I expected to see atleast a SCRUM certification.

jsadhu
jsadhu

ITIL v3 certifications are very popular in the federal circuit

NJKotze
NJKotze

I think everyone in development should learn this. This will help with doing development right from the beginning and start saving money as well as weekends off with the family.

&ltDTECH;
&ltDTECH;

Very great article, nice certifications to gain to improve knowledge of recent problems within IT, good luck to my fellow techs whose planning on taking either one of them and just be tough...."DANIEL"

avtark
avtark

Where are Java/ J2ee certifications? I don't thing this list achieves anything but misleads the masses... Certifications only prove one point... under an time pressured/ unrealistic exam condition someone passed the score set by the vendor... What else does it say about the person's ability to really solve problems and get hands dirty?

keithmayer
keithmayer

Note that Microsoft is bringing back the "MCSE" moniker, but with a slightly different definition - "Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert" - If you're currently an MCITP on Windows Server 2008, you've been grandfathered into the new program - with just two more exams you can earn the new MCSE: Private Cloud certification. There's free study guides for the new MCSE Private Cloud exams at http://aka.ms/studyguides. Might be worth a look! Hope this helps, Keith http://KeithMayer.com - IT Pros ROCK!

Ilikemechs
Ilikemechs

Why choose CISSP over CASP? CASPs prerequisites are 10 years experience while cissp recommends 5?

intushour
intushour

Microsoft Azure is a good certification.

popeye1133a
popeye1133a

I once took a course in SQL Server Administration. It was to be the first in a series that would lead to certification. After paying almost $1000 for the Microsoft book and courseware, I was highly disappointed that as the course work became more complicated, the instructions in the book would not work. As most of us were neo-phytes in SQL Server Admin, the instructor, who was certified had to spend about 30 minutes hacking in order to figure out how to get the exercise to work. One of my fellow students who was a newly minted administrator with about 6 months of experience was working under the tutlage and supervision of an Administrator with about 5 years of experence. His comment was that his supervisor had to spend a lot of time hacking and trying to figure things out just as our instructor had. Unless Microsoft's QA has improved, which I seriously doubt, they are selling for primo bucks, training materials that fail to perform as advertised. It seems if IT hiring managers are going to use certifications to discriminate, that the industry is sorely in need of an agency that guarantees that training materials provide training and not just the thousands of dollars necessary to keep Gate's yacht under way or Ellison's figter jet in the air.

dimesnionalmodeler
dimesnionalmodeler

I agree with BlackHawk_EH - Databases? I find that almost all authors' recommendations are strongly influenced by their own particular bent. Many who aren't directly involved in database work have little knowledge of the real demand for certified database professionals. Not even a mention about them is quite curious. The OCP (Oracle Certified Professional), OCE (Oracle Certified Expert) and many other database credentials from other vendors, are very much in demand. I have four certifications: one Unix and three Oracle Database, including OCP DBA, OCP Advanced PL/SQL Developer and OCE SQL. These certifications, especially the OCPs, were very challenging to achieve made a huge difference once I did.

jjp
jjp

How about Apple certifications? Laugh as much as you want, but Apple is encroaching on Microsoft's territory in terms of sales, with a stable desktop OS and less variations of it across different hardware platforms (as is the case with Windows). Plus, there are no blue screens of death to worry about...

appfloat
appfloat

I am a windows developer by profession, like most of you out there. As all of you know, completion of a project requires a lot of leg-work to be done like creating professional looking UI, creating the ORM layer, etc. Doing leg-work doesn't sound like a problem, but doing the same work again and again for different projects is a problem because you always missout certain aspects. As Larry Wall once said - "The three chief virtues of a programmer are: Laziness, Impatience and Hubris." I was lookin for a job change, found this company (Incognito Technologies Pvt Ltd), met Adi, he told me about the platform (Appfloat) they were using for software development. All these problems were fixed up as Appfloat generates applications with a built in ORM, caching service, access rights manager, auditing module, professional looking UI and many more desired features to deliver a polished LOB application in much less time as Appfloat handles all the leg-work which a developer has to do. The code generated by Appfloat platform is also well structured and has a high mentainability index. So we thaught, lets ease life of other developers out there and make Appfloat usable for general public. We came up with a cross platform solution, the datastory builder (runs over Mac and Windows in browser): tool for designing datastories (basically a datamodel constrained to Appfloat rules), managing projects, generating and downloading source code and executables. Source is always there to etend and modify generated application. Now it is easy for me to design my application datamodel and hit generate button, and Appfloat generates everything for me, source, executbles just in a couple of minutes. Thats whai i was looking for, so you people, developers like me, may also ease your lives with Appfloat. Now let me tell you some cool features, it will start making sence and you will know, why shall you start using Appfloat. Build cloud based applications: Cloud based software applications reduces your hardware, networking management and overall IT expenses. In addition, with cloud computing, you pay for what you use. You can scale as and when you need rather than having to invest upfront. Moreover, users can access the application from wherever. With Appfloat you have the option to build such cloud based applications without getting too technical. Reduce development time: Coding can be a lonely and boring job, especially if it involves writing similar code segments repeatedly. To keep your talented developers motivated by reducing repetitive tasks as Appfloat automatically produces all the repetitive code blocks your applications will ever need. Rushed software development usually leads to defective products as people start cutting corners. This will leave enough slack in the schedule. Design professional applications: Appfloat intelligently designs the user interfaces, drastically reducing the number of errors and their related costs. If users find a software application usable, then the possibility that they use the application again improves drastically. Many support calls and more expensive support consequences (such as application failures) are caused because of inadequate usability design. Increase after-sales support: Often it is not the initial development of the software that is difficult. It is much trickier to keep up with their changing and make appropriate changes in your software application. With high attrition rate in the software industry this is scary, as once the software is built it is generally best supported only by the developers that built it in the first place. Knowledge transfer to avoid after sales problems is very time consuming and expensive. With Appfloat you can get the flexibility and code separation from business logic to make sure you can give your customers unparalleled after sales support. Build on top of a solid foundation: Poka-Yoke is application of a Japanese manufacturing technique to software development Software. Applications built using Appfloat employ the Poka-Yoke design. Poka-Yoke (mistake-proofing) is a design approach which seeks to prevent problems by making applications less prone to miscoding. Increase profitability: A professional looking, bug-free and robust application with advanced features which is supportable results in easier sales cycle. Appfloat also makes it possible to develop such applications atlas 5x faster reducing development costs significantly. All this along with a great after-sales-support will no doubt result in increased sales and profitability for your organization. Keyboard based navigation: In a business environment the software users can reach speeds of more than 100 words a minute. Therefore, if the entire software can be used without touching the mouse the speed of data entry can be increased phenomenally. Certain keys are configured to perform specific repeated tasks using Appfloat built software. Such shortcut keys allow users to perform useful functions. This enables users to use the software with much more ease than using the mouse to navigate through menus and click icons. Declarative business logic: Declarative Business Logic separates the business definition from its code counterpart, making the business application survive beyond current technologies. This provides more freedom for customers. Moreover, you can keep up-to-date with the changing needs of the business your application is supporting and provide with better after-sales support. Completely customisable: Once Appfloat framework generates the application, developers can download the source code and extend the applications much as they need to in order to fulfil the business requirements. All code written is very clearly formatted, easy to understand and extend. Developers can also utilize extensive library of videos that will explain the source code and help them in customization. Once all necessary reports and customizations have been implemented the application can be deployed for the end-users to use. Multiple themes: Developers can customize the look and feel of the application by changing the themes by either selecting the available themes in the Appfloat applications or by specifying individual colours. This way they can offer aesthetically pleasing applications to their customers as per their liking. Audit trail: Audit trails are useful both for maintaining security and recovering lost transactions. It serves as electronic evidence that can be used to trace transactions and verify their validity and accuracy. Applications generated using Appfloat platform comes with an in-built audit trail feature that can be filtered by User, Module, Action Type and Dates. This can be used further to generate advanced Audit Reports for compliance. User access rights: Developers and application administrators of Appfloat based applications can configure multiple levels of security for their users. They can give as much or as little access to each user for each module. The modules for which users do not have "no rights" will not appear in the application. This means the sections and menus auto-configure based on access rights of the users. Excel import & export: Data migration is a key element to consider when adopting any new system. Although migrating data can be a fairly time-consuming process, the benefits can be worth the cost and might mean "live or die" for your application. Additionally, old applications need not be maintained if all legacy data is ported. Appfloat generated applications have Excel Import feature built into them which can be used to put data in exported templates and imported back into the new application. This can save hundreds of data-entry hours for your end users. Almost all data that you see on your application can be filtered and exported to Excel as well. You can therefore leverage a familiar, powerful tool to analyse and report on your results. Workflow: Workflows in Appfloat based applications enable end-users to reduce the amount of unnecessary interactions between people as they perform business processes. For example, to reach a decision, groups typically follow a series of steps, representing a business process. The number of human interactions that occur in business processes can inhibit speed and the quality of decisions. Our in-built workflow simplifies and manages this "human workflow" enabling automation of interactions among users who participate in the process. This results in more speed, overall effectiveness of the interactions, and often a reduction in errors. All workflow actions like Submitting a record creation or updation for Approval, Approving a Request or Rejecting one are also maintained in the Audit. Requests pending approval for a long time, can also be Escalated. Powerful search: Search is a core component of the Appfloat based applications, providing powerful search functionality. All modules have a Search-grid at the bottom which helps users type regular text in the search box and perform search across all records in the module. Moreover, users can search based on Exact or Partial Match on All or Specific columns of the grid. We know that empowering the end-users to quickly and easily find the specific information they need, when they need it, is one of the most critical benefits provided by any application. Repository: Appfloat based applications have a file repository in-built using which users can stores documents against records of specific modules. This repository feature can be turned on for specific users of the applications for specific modules by the developers very easily. While a repository may sound like an upgraded file system, it is much more. The entire lifecycle of your documents can be managed with a good document repository system in place. Benefits of document repository are access control, improved document search and compliance. Module search: You cannot just easily search for data within modules in Appfloat based applications, you can just as easily search for the modules themselves. This might not sound a lot for smaller applications but for larger applications that have hundreds of modules in them users tend to forget the module location i.e. under which menu and sub-menu does the module appear. With module search you can easily search for the modules using "partial text" search. Favourites menu:Users of Appfloat based applications can also mark the modules they work on as favourites. When marking "favourite" the module can also be given a friendly name for the user to remember. The marked modules now will also appear on the "Favourites" Menu for easy access. Package and publish to third party: Once your application is completely built it can be published for third party use using our App Gallery. You can configure the payment details as well so that your clients can use Appfloat's App Gallery to purchase your application license. We will credit your account after deducting the App Gallery hosting charges when we receive the payments from your clients. Users will be able to write comments about your applications as well as rate them on our App Gallery. Pay as-you-go pricing: Appfloat gives you a pay-as-you-go pricing option where you pay monthly on a usage basis and can create unlimited applications with unlimited users. We also work with our customers to co-create innovative pricing models to accommodate large user base and help them offer a strong value proposition to the end user. With us you have the ability to start small and yet dream big without any upfront investments. Easy billing: In the "My Appfloat" section developers will be able to get the exact break-down of the hosting charges by Application and their Versions. This is useful for developers that build applications for third party as they can use this information to charge their clients. Last but not the least, their is also an exception reporting module in the datastory builder which will help you to monitor any exceptions on end-client's machines regarding your application. It provides you with all the necessary details required for debugging as a developer like stack traces, exception details, etc. So now we have got a couple of reasons to switch to appfloat. Stay tuned and happy coding.

CreamingSoda
CreamingSoda

Just because you have a drivers licence doesn't mean your a good driver. In my experience, a solid history in any role will look better then any peice of paper.

crtlbreak
crtlbreak

As my heading says - your list is Bollocks. :( Would love to see where the actual facts and numbers were gleaned from? And who sponsored that information gathering? Or is this merely your private opinion? Regards

neala
neala

So many different certifications, so little time to study for them all. When you look at job descriptions posted by employers it seems they want someone who knows everything, AD, LDAP, DNS, Exchange, SharePoint, Server 2008, SQL, Linux to name a few. And yet they are not wiling to pay decent wages for all this "expert knowledge". Many companies are still running Server 2003. And now Microsoft is confusing everyone by changing the meaning of some of their certifications. For example, MCSA (Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate from MS Systems Administrator), MCSE (Systems Engineer to Solutions Expert). I have both CompTIA Network+ & A+ and also MCP, MCSA 2003, and am studying for Security+. Next after that I would like to get the CCNA from Cisco. Then maybe go back and get Linux+? But I also want to learn more about Exchange and SharePoint.

mjrlynch
mjrlynch

Here is the issue with those certs. Money. Most of those certs are not cheap. Microsoft Certs can be expensive to get depending on which you want. While the article mentions Windows Server, there is also certs on others like SharePoint and Exchange. Cisco is cheap if you go through the academy, but if you don't it can easily cost you close to $1000 for the test and study materials. As a person who has their VCP, I will tell you that I will never go after that certification again. The cost for the courses ($6000 per course), study materials, and test cost me just as much as a bachelors degree from my local university. The same thing goes for the PMP (PMBOK). While in the military you read the PMBOK, getting the cert is nothing but difficult and expensive. From that list the only ones that are considered inexpensive are the A+/N+ certs but if your looking for anything higher than Help Desk then those certs are considered useless.

wcellich
wcellich

I love reading these top ten lists for the entertainment factor of the comment section. ; ^ ) As a CISSP, CEH, and a ton of other certs gathered over twenty some years, plus degrees, and all kinds of other accolades, the one thing I will say that really matters to your employers / clients is - RESULTS. If you are lucky or skillful enough to land a gig, and you do an outstanding job of it, then word will get around that you can do IT. (Whatever IT is.) Having the certs gives YOU a great sense of achievement, I can attest to this. I busted my narrow a** to get that CISSP, and pretty much all of them. I don't feel someone who has not gone through a similar experience is in a position to judge their worth to ME. I can honestly say that CEH doesn't compare to CISSP, and that MCTS does not make you a great programmer, even though I have all of them. In my humble opinion, CEH is neat in the way it exposes you to the nuts and bolts of IT security and the CISSP is what separates the management guys from everyone else. The difference is that any competent person with some technical ability can DO the things in the CEH domains. I would submit that a substantially fewer number of people can do everything required to get CISSP. In the grand scheme of things, the CISSP is a very respected cert because it is managed well by its parent organization. CEH may eventually get there as well. I agree with those who stated that SANS certs, Linux, and DB certs, as well as ITIL were given short shrift on this PARTICULAR list. However, this is a Microsoft centric offering, and in that light (and seeing that HR is mostly interested in these particular certs) I would have to agree that the list seems pretty accurate. Best luck in all our careers!

F.Damper
F.Damper

I like how A+/Network+ cert's are on here.They give organizations baseline of a persons knowledge; especially dealing with tech support jobs, internships and many entry level positions. Gives an impression of solid understanding for why and how the IT structure behaves.

jonnykkcage
jonnykkcage

Indeed Why is Citrix nowhere to be found?

shaddmolete
shaddmolete

I am in Telecommunication and studied IT (A+, N+ with a bit of web development HTML and Java). what course can you suggest to study since I am in Telecoms? was thinking of CCNA (Cisco)?

rapenchukd
rapenchukd

@hareeshkp06

Go the RHEL route. Linux based systems are the wave of the future- they are cheaper and perform better than Microsoft servers almost universally. You will find that being a Linux professional will open up a LOT more jobs as well (DEVOPS, CLOUD, INTEGRATION). Windows will be the desktop of choice for a long time, but RHEL is pulling a HUGE portion of the market share from Windows and UNIX. Go RHEL and don't look back.

Don't forget that an Upper level MS admin makes as much as a lower-mid level Linux admin- in the DC area windows admins range around probably 40k-100k, where Linux admins start at around $70k and go upwards of $130k

rapenchukd
rapenchukd

@hareeshkp06

Go the RHEL route. Senior MS administrators make the same as Junior to mid level Linux admins- and Linux (specifically RHEL) is pulling a huge chunk of Microsofts server market share. The RHEL certs are also not written- and require you to accomplish specific tasks on an actual system. Stepping into Linux systems will also open up a ton of jobs in the DEV-OPS environments and cloud environments. Specializing in Microsoft is a thing of the past, sure desktops will stay MS for a long time- but enterprise servers are almost all going to Linux because of higher performance and lower cost.

Nkwuda
Nkwuda

@Joeyolive1 I may not doubt you because, there are always failures in every career. But all things being equal, A+ and N+ are very rich certification programmes to begin with in the world of pros. I have done both studies and practiced them for years and it has just always put me above my peers in technology when competing for jobs (as a Computer Scientists). Yet, it's funny i have not written the exams.