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The 10 dumbest tech predictions for 2012

We may not know exactly what's going to happen in the tech world this year -- but a lot of you have strong opinions about what WON'T be happening.

Last week, we put out a Call for Feedback asking you, the loyal TechRepublic community, to tell us what you think are among the dumbest, most outlandish, or least likely "predictions" that will supposedly come true in 2012. As always, you came through with your opinions -- loud and clear! Here are some of the entries we received, along with a little editorial commentary.

1: Tablets will replace laptops and desktops this year

"The forecast that tablets will replace laptop and desktop systems is way out of line. They just came out and are still in their infancy/growth stage. Maybe in 5 years they will have developed and the Wi-Fi/4G backbone to support them will be in place to make them viable." -- majorhl

Justin James followed up with:

"Tablets will hit the laptops first and then desktops, once good universal docking stations are available to overcome their limitations for "sit down work." It will DEFINITELY not be on the "this year" timeline... we're talking 5 to 10 years, if I had to guess."

Lassiter12: "I've had an iPad for over a year, and I now do most of my reading and short replies on it. In fact, I spend more time reading on it than I do on the laptop. The biggest pad problem is the virtual keyboard. It's much more difficult to use than one on the laptop. I'm a fair typist on the latter, but on the tablet, I'm always accidentally swiping a key that appears in the message. It's also more difficult to correct by placing the cursor exactly where you want it. I expect to continue using both."

My take: I agree with Justin; tablets will displace (and in some cases, are displacing) laptops, particularly for light or casual users who are primarily content consumers rather than content creators. Longer-term, I see danger for desktops as well. How many of you out there know someone who has a computer at home and it just sits there most of the time, going unused?

That said, a more significant shift will take a lot more time than just 2012 and will require that some additional familiar apps make their way to the tablet form factor. These apps include Microsoft Office, the de facto standard for content creation. Further, I would argue that there will need to be a substantial VDI or application virtualization initiative in companies that go this route. Even though the cloud is all the rage, a ton of business is done on legacy ERPs with legacy apps, which requires legacy desktop access.

2: This will be a do-or-die year for Windows Phone

Dumb prediction: "If MS doesn't get significant phone market share this year, they never will." -- (dogknees)

My take: I agree to a point with dogknees, but here's the caveat. Microsoft has been trying for a while to grab some market share, and it has made meager progress on that front. Personally, I believe it has a great thing on its hands. But its marketing efforts have been less than stellar. Recently, however, Microsoft has committed to selling devices the way that sales people want to sell them, so there may be some hope yet. With so much of this year's focus going to Windows 8, I think that Microsoft will get a pass on Windows Phone for 2012 while people see what the company does to integrate the experience across all of its platforms,  including the Xbox, the desktop, the handheld, and even the cloud.

3: Windows 8 Metro interface will become the default

"Big, beautiful HTML 5-based tiles are a nifty idea that looks and works great on Windows Phone and might work on a tablet. But... The idea that the Metro interface will become the default (or even dominant) interface for Windows is farfetched. Windows users (and Mac users, too), both consumer and business, are too married to the traditional desktop and Start menu (or Dock) combo to make an immediate jump to a substantially new interface." -- Try2BWise

My take: I agree wholeheartedly on this one. It's going to take a long time for people to adjust to Metro. Just look at the "crisis" that emerged for many when Office 2007 hit the scene. I was a very early adopter of Office 2007 and hated the Ribbon. Now, though, I wouldn't give it up.

Microsoft spends millions of dollars on usability testing. It's not going to bet the company on something it has no confidence in, and there will be plenty of ways to opt out of Metro in favor of a traditional experience.

4: Businesses will trust all their proprietary data to the cloud

"I expect that 2012 will see the first few debacles/disasters of 'Enterprise in the Cloud, and the predicted rush to its use will be replaced by a bit of corporate prudence, as most businesses will wait for 'somebody else to go first.'" -- hippiekarl

My take: I see 2012 and 2013 as the years in which "The Cloud" becomes "the cloud" and takes on something with a bit less mystique as people learn the ins and outs of contract language, security protocols, data integration, and support. We've also seen debacles in 2011 -- Amazon's outage, for example -- that serve as warnings for those who wish to jump in with feet first. Even dismissing all the hype, once we move to the cloud being just another part of the portfolio rather than a singular strategy in and of itself, I believe we'll start to see much more adoption.

5: SMBs will mass migrate to the cloud

"This is becoming the same prediction every year, and honestly, the cost of bandwidth is too high for this to become reality. I deal with companies that moved to the cloud and are moving away from it because everything was too slow." -- mbkavka

My take: Those on the bleeding edge will sometimes bleed the hardest, but don't forget that those who take the bigger risks have the potential to reap bigger rewards, too. Although some have been burned by ill-advised plans and, perhaps, unmet vendor promises, these serve as examples by which to learn and, hopefully, not make the same mistake twice.

On bandwidth, it's incredible how much disparity there is in this area. I've been watching Missouri's bandwidth initiatives with interest and hope that someday, we see high speed Internet access as a required service, just like electricity and phone service.

6: Books will become interactive

"This was on a BBC documentary in the UK looking at the demise of paper books and some intellectual pundit suggesting that books would stop being fixed items that we consume, and that everyone would be interacting with their e-books and choosing the endings. What a load of rubbish. I have just got a Kindle, but I still like to consume the books -- this is someone's work of literary art, and I cannot see any situation where I wouldn't want to know how John Grisham or Jeffrey Deaver ends the story." -- yorkshirepudding

My take: As a higher education leader watching how much students struggle to make ends meet, I can't wait to see someone seriously disrupt the textbook industry in a way that provides students with the tools they need at prices that are reasonable. Interactive books would be incredible, too. Maybe that someone will be Apple, with its recent announcement that it is "reinventing" textbooks with iBooks.

7: Windows 8 will be affordable and seamless across platforms

"MS will bring out a Windows 8 that will seamlessly scale from smartphones to desktops, at a competitive price" -- radleym

My take: Agreed. This isn't going to happen in 2012. But I bet it does happen eventually. Microsoft has demonstrated the ability to seamlessly move from an Xbox console to a PC to a smart device, so it's not a farfetched concept. But it's going to take a while for Windows 8 to settle into the market and then Microsoft needs to find a way to bring order to the three separate platforms and ensure a consistent user experience across the spectrum.

8: Only cheaper Android tablets will be successful

"Android tablets will only succeed at under-$200." -- radleym

My take: I'm not a huge fan of Android, but I can admit that there are some nice Android tablets out there. That said, when you look at the Android tablets that have been really successful, we have the Kindle Fire, a cheap tablet, and that unit is so heavily customized that it barely looks like Android. I would also argue that the Fire has been successful in no small part due to the fact that Amazon was backing it and it has a huge ecosystem behind it that is presented to the user in a reasonable way.

So I think there is success for Android, but with these caveats: 1) Really expensive Android tablets will remain niche for 2012; 2) The Fire (and Fire 2, etc.) will continue to improve and provide users with a "good enough" experience for the price.

9: We can predict technology

"I read Steve Jobs' essay in 2000 and could not understand how everyone could have their own phone number and be reached anywhere. Now I only buy shirts that have pockets to carry my iPhone in. No way to guess what will happen five years from now (except by the people working on closely guarded secret stuff)." -- lassiter12

My take: Point taken! It's tough to guess, but its kind of fun, too. I look forward to revisiting this article in January 2013 and seeing what came true and what didn't.

10: The world is going to end -- Nostradamus, Harold Camping

My take: Seriously, folks, do you really believe t....<buzz><crackle>

About

Since 1994, Scott Lowe has been providing technology solutions to a variety of organizations. After spending 10 years in multiple CIO roles, Scott is now an independent consultant, blogger, author, owner of The 1610 Group, and a Senior IT Executive w...

46 comments
fluxtatic
fluxtatic

Lassiter's comment in #9 is just stupid. It was by then (2000) very obvious that cell phones would become ubiquitous. It was no vision on Jobs' part to see that coming. Given that cell phones had already been around for nearly three decades by then, it was nearly past due, wasn't it?

chdchan
chdchan

It's rather paradoxical, and we're too overwhelmed by ads saying that IT is so avant garde and wonderful.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

Asus memo 370T will sell boat loads. Quad core at a $250 price point

jayohem
jayohem

Do you think if solar power actually catches on, wired or wireless access will be more accessible nationwide? Will an increased use of fiberoptics boost use and reduce cost? Will we be relying more on satellites? Will the roof act as a signal booster? Should college kids start looking for summer jobs as solar panel installers or cable stringers?

philstilliard
philstilliard

1. Tablets will not replace my desktop or laptop, I like a keyboard. 10. Whether this year or soon, when Iran goes nuclear, unless Israel takes out their installation first, there will be World War 3. There is so much hatred between these two. It is Iran's avowed intention to take out Israel, unless they get there first.

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

I guess I'm old fashioned but when it comes to something technical or academic, I prefer a real book in my hands. Over the weekend I did some tweaks to my Home Theater setup. My HT receiver has a video output so you can see all the menu choices on your TV screen instead of the one-line display on the front panel. The manuasl for both the reciever and TV have gone into that same black hole that eats socks from the dryer so I had to find them online. Ugh. With the printed manual I can easily hold page 32 with one hand while reading page 70, and then go back and forth to see the references. I can also grab the nearest pen/pencil and write notes in the margins. I have no idea how I would do that with a PDF. Much of that applies to textbooks, as well. But it would be nice to carry an eReader to class instead of a 5 pound text. It would also make revisions much easier.

mhoff1387
mhoff1387

I would also love to see a way to disrupt the stranglehold major publishers have on the textbook market. It probably won't be this year, but I can see in the near future, a textbook format that's more like Wikipedia + social media than standard textbook. The textbook would be updated instantly should scientific breakthroughs happen (think recent changes in understanding of the Higgs Boson.) Students and teachers may come up with a good "what-if" question that slightly alters the normal procedure for problem solving, then those questions can be crowd sourced and up-voted and possibly be included as an example problem in the next update. (On a related note, I am not advocating for a free for all internet experience with textbooks. There is a real need for some kind of panel to review content before it can be published.) As for the commenter and pundit that are worried about your John Grisham novels...I don't think you have to worry about your favorite author not getting to finish his own book. There is already a whole subculture that writes alternative endings/story lines to popular works or a cult favorite...it's called fan fiction. And some of it is pretty good.

apotheon
apotheon

The major vendors will continue to push our computing experiences further toward restrictive, control-freakish configurations, trying to lead people like lemmings to the cliff at the end of the road, beyond which general purpose computing has been utterly defanged, declawed, and spayed or neutered. In the process, they'll continue to lose customers to alternative systems, in a trickle small enough that they never quite catch on to the real reasons for the loss of market share.

apotheon
apotheon

That's not my book; must be yours. No, wait -- it's Apple's. I can only assume by the way Scott Lowe speaks in positive terms about iBooks that he doesn't know about the Draconian, utterly unacceptable license terms for the application framework that essentially grants Apple ownership of everything you "author" with it. Screw that. I'd like to find someone who has the application so I can examine it in detail, figure out what "killer features" are present, implement something better that doesn't restrict what people can do with the resultant content -- and ridicule the person for the apple fanboyism that prompts the person to acquire such a horribly repugnant application (for licensing reasons if nothing else).

gak
gak

What if they did the testing wrong? For example, the Metro start screen in developer preview replaced the start menu in such a way, that actual developing is hardly possible until a registry hack returns the classic start menu. No usability testing can show what happens when users get used to the new thing. There is just not enough time for that. MS may think that at that stage it is too late for users to escape. What if that is wrong? They explain what they did in Windows 8 blogs. Many things were done right, but they never listed the functions of Windows 7 and checked that every function is matched in Metro. They risk to fell victim of the same thing that prevents alternative office suits to replace MS Office - everyone discovers that one single he heeds no matter what is missing. BTW, MS spent millions on Vista too, right? Metro is not a new way to present applications. It is a new way to write them. It will either be a success, which I hope but doubt, or a complete failure. I there are "plenty of ways to opt out of Metro in favor of a traditional experience", then MS surrenders without a fight.

apotheon
apotheon

People who make predictions about the inevitable move of the majority of users away from general-purpose computing to tablets and smartphones and other limited- or focused-purpose computers often meet disagreement with derision. Their typical defense of their notions about the future of popular computing is that the detractors think like what they are -- geeks, who need a lot of high-power specialized functionality -- rather than like the majority of users, who only really engage in very simple activities with needs easily served by tablets and smartphones and the like. In some respects, they are right; we geeks think about the future of computing from the perspective of geeks, and not that of people who don't understand (or even want to know) that there are other options for how to use a text editor than point-and-click (for instance). They take things too far, though. In recognizing that there is a difference between different types of computer users, they then go on to imagine that the most simplistic, narrowly identified differences constitute the entire difference, in all ways, applied universally. The truth of the matter is that the average, mainstream, non-geek user is still an increasingly sophisticated user with every passing year (or month, or week, or day). Sure, they may be uninterested in the finger-tangling complexities of emacs, the steep initial learning curve of vi, or even the combination of simplicity of interface and flexibility and power of text processing (relative to MS Word, though it lags substantially behind vi and emacs) of something like SciTE, but the specific reasons geeks want the full power of general purpose computing at their fingertips are not the only reasons to want that power. Limited- or focused-purpose computing devices like tablets and smartphones are simply not well-suited to the tasks for which we really buy computers -- any of us, pretty much. Copying content across applications, saving and sharing finds on the Web, discussing and publishing opinions about things in textual form, editing images and video, playing games that require a bit of invested thinking and rapid realtime reactions, highly networked interactive environments, comparison shopping (very difficult with the limited multitasking abilities of tablet and smartphone UI models), and many more everyday tasks are nearly impossible to accomplish in many cases, and far more frustrating to accomplish than they are worth in many other cases, when limited to the computing paradigms people claim will replace general purpose computing systems like laptops and desktops. Sure, they may not be doing what I did a few days ago -- lying in bed, not yet ready to fall asleep, writing a dice roller program for Android on my Android smartphone using the tiny little keyboard attached because I insisted on getting a smartphone with a physical keyboard that didn't completely suck -- but they'll come to the same conclusion I did, just with relation to different uses for the device: For a lot of what we do, the entire concept of smartphone and tablet UIs, dictated to a significant degree by the physical form factors of the devices, is simply insufficient to satisfy the user. edit: Oh, yeah -- I did actually get the dice roller written and working properly, and in under twenty minutes. On the other hand, it would have been less than five, and with far more functionality and flexibility, if I had been writing it on a laptop. A big part of the problem had nothing to do with the actual writing of code, anyway; it had to do with the cumbersome process of switching between applications when I needed to look up API documentation, run the program, and write code for the program. If you think "normal" users don't multitask, you haven't been paying attention, and are probably just grossly underestimating the sophistication of most users.

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

"Content consumers"? What ever happened to reading, watching, listening? "Content consumer" is nothing more than another meaningless, faux-high-register, phrase similar to "seamless customer experience" and "synergies".

gates_clone
gates_clone

Seriously, folks, do you really believe t???. ...we are anonymous. We don't forget. We don't forgive.

M Wagner
M Wagner

The $200 Amazon Fire works for all the reasons you state. Apple succeeds at $500 to $830 because Apple customers are loyal to a fault. HP learned the hard way that there is a lot of pent-up demand at cut-throat prices but those prices are not sustainable. In the end, tablet makers (Android and the others) have to learn to live in-between $200 and $500 and they need to have a robust ecosystem to support the device. The sole exception might be Microsoft - provided that Windows 8 can deliver a robust tablet with all of the capabilities of a laptop and all of the convenience of an iPad are a competitive price-point.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

Kindle Fire completely hides the Android OS with it's own layer. Yes it uses Android OS, but that is not what makes it successfull. It's $199 is what makes it successfull. What that means is, people looking for a narrowly defined device don't care what the OS is. They care what it does, and $199 is a very nice price point. For me, I want a fully functional Android device along with the Android experience. There is nothing the Fire can do that the Transformer Prime can't, but the opposite cannot be said.

pgit
pgit

Tom Brady's right elbow servo will overheat in the 3rd quarter of the super bowl. The resultant fire will damage the integrity of the outer shell, mind you a load bearing monocoque design, enough so that Brady will be forced to swap the left and right blades, reboot and use his left arm for the remainder of the game. But there will be no need to adjust the offensive line, Brady will simply rotate his head 180 degrees and play 'backward.' With the exception of his remaining elbow pointing forward and his toes pointing aft, no one will notice any difference.

terry.sanderson
terry.sanderson

RIM will rise like the phoenix from the ashes Ha! Just heard that Balsillie and Lazaridis finally resigned and that RIM has promoted Thorsten Heins (internally) as the new CEO. C'mon RIM, do what needs to be done and bring in someone from the outside. P.S. Even if Thorsten is your savior, he isn't going to do it in a few weeks; you're too far down the hole to be pulled up in one yank.

Shadeburst
Shadeburst

The world will end in 5105, we were just holding the Mayan calendar upside-down. But seriously... Many years ago, the touchstone for success was the "killer app." This is still true today but I haven't heard anyone use the term recently.

Jody Gilbert
Jody Gilbert

Hi SkyWlf77, The idea behind this column is to ask for feedback and then analyze the issues that emerge from it. In this case, Scott asked for people to give their opinions on what they thought were dumb predictions and then he responded with his perspective -- some supportive, some not so much. The idea is to bat around ideas, consider implications, discuss possibilities. Like, you know, a friendly debate. You can agree/disagree with the predictions or with Scott's take on the predictions... or contribute some of your own. --Jody

Scott Lowe
Scott Lowe

I tried to place some context and commentary around each one, but didn't think I was coming off as agreeing with half of them. But, maybe it's how I'm reading it. Scott

SkyWlf77
SkyWlf77

You name your article "The 10 dumbest tech predictions for 2012" and then you proceed to AGREE with half of them.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

Can I just add to that, on the positive side, the people that stay with "major vendor(s)" will have Siri. I know , I know, sarcastic, but true.

pgit
pgit

Amazingly prescient, I will predict. Especially being oblivious to the reasons people will exit along the margins. I'm about ready to give using totem poles for "long range" communications a try. The way hardware is going, soon the hardware will BE the OS and the app(s) Who knows what it'll be doing to you behind your back...

paulfx1
paulfx1

But someday in the far flung future Linux will end up on top. Or am I giving my fellow human beings too much credit for being intelligent?

apotheon
apotheon

"Content consumers" is actually a term for "passive receivers of propaganda and collective deep pockets for a business model". It regards the market not as being made up of people whose needs ought to be met for maximum value on all sides, but as a statistical formula into which inputs can be fed in return for expected outputs -- where the outputs are market share numbers, revenues, and preferred distribution model lock-in effectiveness. Meanwhile, all of us "content consumers" would like to be able to read good writing, listen to good music, and see good video productions. Less and less are we served in those desires. The "content providers" who buck the trend and offer what we "content consumers" really want, turning us back into actual people in their business models, will have a substantial competitive advantage -- if they aren't crowded out of the market by insane legislation (see SOPA and PIPA, for instance, which are in reality probably targeted much more at small competitors than at so-called "pirates") and direct, anti-competitive economic bullying.

M Wagner
M Wagner

The iPad story is about simplicity by way of a gilded cage. The Fire story is about flexibility and simplicity at a modest price-point. The Android market is too fragmented and offers too many choices for the consumer. Android is the geek's choice.

mckinnej
mckinnej

Maybe "Most Outlandish" or "Most Drastic" would have been better than "Dumbest".

SkyWlf77
SkyWlf77

I was a bit confused there, then. When I read the article's title, it seemed apparent that what he would be listing were the dumbest predictions he had found on the web (or heard in person). Then, when several of them contained plain "I agree" language, it threw off the entire vibe of the article for me. I apologize to both of you that I got lost in the process here. Thanks for the clarification.

apotheon
apotheon

I must be having a slow day. I don't get it. Siri, as far as I'm aware, is some kind of datebook application for Apple iOS. I don't really know much about it beyond that. What's the significance of mentioning it in this context?

apotheon
apotheon

If it's behind me, and doing something to me . . . I think I can imagine what it might be trying to do. I'll be keeping my back to the wall, and a computer running an open source (copyfree licensed, specifically) OS at hand.

apotheon
apotheon

I think Linux will fade by then, unless it undergoes a significant, fundamental change along the way. We'll eventually get some kind of open source operating system "on top", though. Linux-based systems suffer too many shortcomings that stand in the way of "world domination", including the specific license (which prohibits its effective combination with a lot of other open source software and scares business people, among other things), the "new is better even when it's worse" attitude of its "rockstar" developers, and its tendency to become more and more like what its advocates want it to replace (and not in a good way).

pgit
pgit

But a heads up is in order... you have just flung poo upon well over half the population here in TR. :)

pgit
pgit

hitting it square on the head: ""Content consumers" is actually a term for "passive receivers of propaganda and collective deep pockets for a business model". It regards the market not as being made up of people whose needs ought to be met for maximum value on all sides, but as a statistical formula into which inputs can be fed in return for expected outputs -- where the outputs are market share numbers, revenues, and preferred distribution model lock-in effectiveness." "People" drive media profits, collectively "people" are the engine that drives those bottom line metrics. See what Fox news thinks of it's engine, the viewers: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/cutline/fox-news-zings-cnn-msnbc-holiday-card-just-164515834.html Sheep... nuff said. "content consumers" must bust a few laughs every time it's uttered in the board rooms. Perhaps dung beetles would be a better representation of us "consumers."

apotheon
apotheon

It's odd that you start out saying what amounts to "The iPad sucks and gets in the way of any meaningful use, and is grossly overpriced; that's why it's better." Fragmentation isn't nearly the fatal flaw people seem to think. Especially for special-purpose devices like ereaders and tablets, data and protocol compatibility is much more important than any unified device strategy. The problem with analyses like yours might be that it is easy to think of an individual Android device as standing in for the entire Android ecosystem and, in the same breath, using the "fragmentation" (read: user choice) of the entire Android ecosystem as an argument against a single Android device as if that "fragmentation" matters for that single device. What the "fragmentation" really means for that single device, if anything, is that the device enjoys broad compatibility with legions of other devices, both competing and complementary, making it a more useful and attractive choice for someone interested in doing more than playing Angry Birds.

apotheon
apotheon

I'm referring to a combination of APIs, ability to install executable programs outside the limited context of the official package management system (unless you root it), somewhat monolithic design of the OS all the way up to the UI (sounds like MS Windows . . . ?), and the simple lack of basic tools in a default install. Hell, the fact users have to jump through hoops, void warranties, and risk hosing up the system to get root access to their own devices is just an egregiously bad state of affairs. I wouldn't use a tablet running any closed source operating system for any purposes other than narrow professional necessities (e.g., testing software to see if it works on the platform). I have no interest in trusting my general computing activities and private data to a closed source operating system developed and supported by a company whose interests are not even remotely aligned with my own, because I don't like getting screwed over.

pgit
pgit

I saw an Asus transformer yesterday, first look at ICS. I asked the owner if it was possible to 'hack the kernel' and he replied in the negative. I'm not positive but isn't the source code freely available? At least you could know everything the system is doing, even though you have little to no control over it. It appears to me the problem is the ability to write to the OS, however it's stored. There seems to be no mechanism for loading OS components in user space, compiling things and writing it back to wherever the OS is stored/loads from. This fellow thought the OS resides in some sort of EEPROM-ish hardware, that the user has no access to, but google does when pushing updates to the system. If this is correct, and android is open source, isn't it inevitable someone will write a hack and open the door to more "Linuxy" development on the tablet form factor? I'm interested in your take on 'feeling limited' by android. Is it the inability to alter it to your liking? Or are you referring to APIs and app development? Would you ever use a tablet running windows? Call it ironic, but I'm thinking I would not use a tablet unless it was running a 'full blown OS' on which I could run the existing tools I use now. I'd prefer Linux, but I don't see that happening ATM.

apotheon
apotheon

I wondered if that might have been what you meant. Thanks for clearing it up. I actually feel pretty limited by Android, so I'm sure you can imagine how much worse iOS would be for my preferences.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

I thought that your description..."utterly defanged, declawed, and spayed or neutered", was pretty accurate for Apple iOS.

apotheon
apotheon

Are you asking what I'd want to upvote about it? The whole thing. Thanks for the positive regard for what I wrote, too. edit: Upvoting started working for me again.

pgit
pgit

or the reference to the disdain one mainstream 'content provider' has for it's 'consumers?'

apotheon
apotheon

I'd upvote your comment, but TR's interface is being weird for me right now, and voting doesn't work. The comment reply interface is getting a little strange, too; I'm not sure it won't go belly-up on me, too.

apotheon
apotheon

Consider it forgotten, at least from my side -- in part because I don't recall the incident(s) in question. I generally try to treat each context separately, anyway. edit: typo (ironically, "forgot" the "n" on "forgotten")

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

No, I think we got off on the wrong foot, but I tend to agree with much of your comments.

apotheon
apotheon

You say that like it surprises you. Did you expect to disagree?