Leadership

The industry's 10 best IT certifications

IT pros tend to have strong opinions when debating the value of professional certification -- and views become even more polarized when it comes down to a discussion of which certs are meaningful. Erik Eckel put together a list of the accreditations he believes currently hold value for IT pros.

IT pros tend to have strong opinions when debating the value of professional certification -- and views become even more polarized when it comes down to a discussion of which certs are meaningful. Erik Eckel put together a list of the accreditations he believes currently hold value for IT pros.


IT certifications boast numerous benefits. They bolster resumes, encourage higher salaries, and assist in job retention. But which IT certifications are best?

Technology professionals generate much debate over just that question. Many claim vendor-specific programs best measure a candidate's skills, while others propose vendor-independent exams are the only worthy way of measuring real-world expertise. Still other observers believe the highest-level accreditations -- Microsoft's MCSE or new Architect Series certification, Cisco's CCIE, etc. -- are the only credentials that truly hold value.

Myself, I don't fully subscribe to any of those mindsets. The best IT certification for you, after all, is likely to be different from that for another technology professional with different education, skills, and goals working at a different company in a different industry. For that reason, when pursuing any professional accreditation, you should give much thought and care to your education, experience, skills, goals, and desired career path.

Once a career road map is in place, selecting a potential certification path becomes much easier. And that's where this list of the industry's 10 best IT certifications comes into play. While this list may not include the 10 best accreditations for you, it does catalog 10 IT certifications that possess significant value for a wide range of technology professionals.

Note: This information is also available as a PDF download.

#1: MCITP

The new-generation Microsoft Certified IT Professional credential, or MCITP for short, is likely to become the next big Microsoft certification. Available for a variety of fields of expertise -- including database developer, database administrator, enterprise messaging administrator, and server administrator -- an MCITP validates a professional's proven job-role capabilities. Candidates must pass several Microsoft exams that track directly to their job role before earning the new designation.

As with Microsoft's other new-generation accreditations, the MCITP certification will retire when Microsoft suspends mainstream support for the platforms targeted within the MCITP exams. By matching the new certification to popular job roles, as has been done to some extent with CompTIA's Server+ (server administrator), Project+ (project manager), and A+ (desktop support) certifications, Microsoft has created a new certification that's certain to prove timely, relevant, and valuable.

#2: MCTS

The new-generation Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) helps IT staff validate skills in installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting a specific Microsoft technology. The MCTS certifications are designed to communicate the skills and expertise a holder possesses on a specific platform.

For example, candidates won't earn an MCTS on SQL Server 2008. Instead, they'll earn an MCTS covering SQL Server business intelligence (MCTS: SQL Server 2008 Business Intelligence), database creation (MCTS: SQL Server 2008, Database Development), or SQL server administration (MCTS: SQL Server 2008, Implementation and Maintenance).

These new certifications require passing multiple, tightly targeted exams that focus on specific responsibilities on specific platforms. MCTS designations will expire when Microsoft suspends mainstream support for the corresponding platform. These changes, as with other new-generation Microsoft certifications, add value to the accreditation.

#3: Security+

Security continues to be a critical topic. That's not going to change. In fact, its importance is only going to grow. One of the quickest ways to lose shareholder value, client confidence, and sales is to suffer a data breach. And no self-respecting technology professional wants to be responsible for such a breach.

CompTIA's Security+ accreditation provides a respected, vendor-neutral foundation for industry staff (with at least two years of experience) seeking to demonstrate proficiency with security fundamentals. While the Security+ accreditation consists of just a single exam, it could be argued that any IT employee charged with managing client data or other sensitive information should, at a minimum, possess this accreditation. The importance of ensuring staff are properly educated as to systems security, network infrastructure, access control, auditing, and organizational security principles is simply too important to take for granted.

#4: MCPD

There's more to information technology than just administration, support, and networking. Someone must create and maintain the applications and programs that power organizations. That's where the new-generation Microsoft Certified Professional Developer (MCPD) credential comes into play.

The MCPD accreditation measures a developer's ability to build and maintain software solutions using Visual Studio 2008 and Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5. Split into three certification paths (Windows Developer 3.5, ASP.NET Developer 3.5, and Enterprise Applications Developer 3.5), the credential targets IT professionals tasked with designing, optimizing, and operating those Microsoft technologies to fulfill business needs.

A redesigned certification aimed at better-measuring real-world skills and expertise, the MCPD will prove important for developers and programmers. Besides requiring candidates to pass several exams, the MCPD certification will retire when Microsoft suspends mainstream support for the corresponding platform. The change is designed to ensure the MCPD certification remains relevant, which is certain to further increase its value.

#5: CCNA

The Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) accreditation captures most of the networking company's certification glory. But the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) might prove more realistic within many organizations.

In a world in which Microsoft and Linux administrators are also often expected to be networking experts, many companies don't have the budgets necessary to train (or employ) a CCIE. But even small and midsize corporations can benefit from having their technology professionals earn basic proficiency administering Cisco equipment, as demonstrated by earning a CCNA accreditation.

As smaller companies become increasingly dependent upon remote access technologies, basic Cisco systems skills are bound to become more important. Although many smaller organizations will never have the complexity or workload necessary to keep a CCIE busy, Cisco's CCNA is a strong accreditation for technology professionals with a few years' experience seeking to grow and improve their networking skills.

#6: A+

Technology professionals with solid hardware and support skills are becoming tougher to find. There's not much glory in digging elbow-deep into a desktop box or troubleshooting Windows boot errors. But those skills are essential to keeping companies running.

Adding CompTIA's A+ certification to a resume tells hiring managers and department heads that you have proven support expertise. Whether an organization requires desktop installation, problem diagnosis, preventive maintenance, or computer or network error troubleshooting, many organizations have found A+-certified technicians to be more productive than their noncertified counterparts.

Changes to the A+ certification, which requires passing multiple exams, are aimed at keeping the popular credential relevant. Basic prerequisite requirements are now followed by testing that covers specific fields of expertise (such as IT, remote support, or depot technician). The accreditation is aimed at those working in desktop support, on help desks, and in the field, and while many of these staffers are new to the industry, the importance of an A+ certification should not be overlooked.

#7: PMP

Some accreditations gain value by targeting specific skills and expertise. The Project Management Professional (PMP) certification is a great example.

The Project Management Institute (PMI), a nonprofit organization that serves as a leading membership association for project management practitioners, maintains the PMP exam. The certification measures a candidate's project management expertise by validating skills and knowledge required to plan, execute, budget, and lead a technology project. Eligible candidates must have five years of project management experience or three years of project management experience and 35 hours of related education.

As organizations battle tough economic conditions, having proven project scheduling, budgeting, and management skills will only grow in importance. The PMI's PMP credential is a perfect conduit for demonstrating that expertise on a resume.

#8: MCSE/MCSA

Even years after their introduction, Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) credentials remain valuable. But it's important to avoid interpreting these accreditations as meaning the holders are all-knowing gurus, as that's usually untrue.

In my mind, the MCSE and MCSA hold value because they demonstrate the holder's capacity to complete a long and comprehensive education, training, and certification program requiring intensive study. Further, these certifications validate a wide range of relevant expertise (from client and server administration to security issues) on specific, widely used platforms.

Also important is the fact that these certifications tend to indicate holders have been working within the technology field for a long time. There's no substitute for actual hands-on experience. Many MCSEs and MCSAs hold their certifications on Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 platforms, meaning they've been working within the industry for many years. While these certifications will be replaced by Microsoft's new-generation credentials, they remain an important measure of foundational skills on Windows platforms.

#9: CISSP

As mentioned with the Security+ accreditation earlier, security is only going to grow in importance. Whatever an organization's mission, product, or service, security is paramount.

(ISC)², which administers the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) accreditation, has done well building a respected, vendor-neutral security certification. Designed for industry pros with at least five years of full-time experience, and accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the CISSP is internationally recognized for validating a candidate's expertise with operations and network and physical security, as well as their ability to manage risk and understand legal compliance responsibilities and other security-related elements.

#10: Linux+

While pursuing my first Microsoft certification 10 years ago, I remember debating the importance of Linux with several telecommunications technicians. They mocked the investment I was making in learning Microsoft technologies. These techs were confident Linux was going to displace Windows.

Well, didn't happen. Linux continues to make inroads, though. The open source alternative is an important platform. Those professionals who have Linux expertise and want to formalize that skill set will do well adding CompTIA's Linux+ certification to their resumes.

The vendor-neutral exam, which validates basic Linux client and server skills, is designed for professionals with at least six to 12 months of hands-on Linux experience. In addition to being vendor-neutral, the exam is also distribution neutral (meaning the skills it covers work well whether a candidate is administering Red Hat, SUSE, or Ubuntu systems).

Let the debate begin

Technology professionals almost always have strong reactions when debating certification's value. Listing the top 10 certifications leaves room, of course, for only 10 credentials. That means many favorite and popular designations, such as HIPAA and Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) certifications, have been necessarily omitted. Other important accreditations, including those for VoIP providers and from PC manufacturers, Red Hat, and even Apple, have also been left out here.

Which certifications would you leave off this list and which would you add in their place? Join the discussion and share the logic behind your choices.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

142 comments
george2222
george2222

well-established name relating IT certifications resources and test materials. Highly respected industry leaders bring real test and certifications resources for Exam sheets' customers. These IT exams training materials are powerful enough that we GUARANTEE you to pass any and all of your IT certification exams on the first attempt.  http://www.certleaks.com/

augusthorvath
augusthorvath

I recently signed up and paid for an exam preparation site, PrepKing.com, to prepare for taking the Microsoft 70-516 exam. The site clearly stated that you would be able to begin using their test engine immediately after purchase, which is why I wanted to use their service. Well, after paying for this service, the Download link did not work at all. There is no phone number posted on their site. I had to repeaetedly email them before I got a response. When I finally did get a respone, all I received was a PDF document with questions and answers and a they informed me that the testing engine was not available for this course. PrepKing's office is in England......stay far away from them. I would not recommend this company to my worst enemy.

testingweb
testingweb

By IT Certification any one can achieve a golden chance to improve our advancement and earning potential. By This certified degree you will get not only a senior level but you can also maximize your salary package. www.testkingweb.com

ounelly70
ounelly70

Because I felt like the hiring managers I was talking to, didn't really know about the MCITP yet. I would tell them I was training and working my way to get it and they'd all ask me what it was. But they seemed to know what the MCSE was, I already had extensive knowledge in a 2003 environment, so I thought it'd be a good route to take. And it paid off - I have a job I love now actually using my certs :D I actually went to a bootcamp training course (Ced solutions in Atlanta, GA) and spent a week there - you get a lot of hands on time and instruction - you of course will get no where with a boot camp if you don't already have a decent foundation in the subject matter or at least some real experience, but I like that they do tell you that before you go. It was a great experience, I really did learn a lot and there were things we went into detail about that I just didn't quite grasp before... like subnetting hahah

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Is a Degree in an IT subject. Certs are 10 a penny - Degrees take years and show real commitment. Employers like this.

hsb101
hsb101

What about SAP and Oracle people?

bfonseca
bfonseca

RHCE belongs on the list IMHO

estebs1978
estebs1978

I think that being certified is very important. I landed a great job that required a bachelor's degree but thanks to my certifications (MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCTS, MCITP-EA) I got the job. With that said, I have met many "paper certified engineers". These are the people that hold certifications but could not begin to troubleshoot a beeping server with an amber light and a MBR error. Experience+certifications is what employers look for in my opinion. Also, VMWare (or virtualization) certifications and SAN certifications are very important because this is where the industry is moving and moving quick. My two cents anyway.

Mohan R
Mohan R

Hi myself mohan im currently working as desktop support in Fidelity Bangalore , i want to know which certification will help me in carrer

vishal_chou
vishal_chou

I have done two of these certifications MCSE and CCNA.According to you which job should I go for now?

in4mationjunkie
in4mationjunkie

What are the criteria for "best" certification? I'm a certified computing professional (CCP) and certified data management professional (CDMP) through the Institute for Certification of Computing Professionals. This organization is often overlooked, although it has been around since the early 1970s. It's a vendor-neutral non-profit organization dedicated to professionalism in IT, so it would not be included if the criteria is based on profit. However, it is also not influenced by vendor product bias. Personally, I'd rather be certified as a professional in the field, with requirements for continuing professional development and a code of ethics (like the accounting profession's CPA), rather than just tested on whether I know a set of vendor products (i.e., Microsoft). This is more broad and encompasses all current and future technologies. In fact, many of the certifications above will count toward professional certification by ICCP. (http://www.iccp.org).

joshimam
joshimam

A degree in my case would count Gives you the base, Certs..on the other will bring Money on the table Quickly but the relevance overtime needs to be put on check. To stay on edge in the field you need to keep-up with necessary certification. What about CISA?

dburrus
dburrus

While I agree most certification are important, I do believe the certifications that require documentation of prior experience and education (PMP is one I know) before even taking the exam are the certifications that hold more weight. As with PMP not just anyone can read a book a sit for the exam, you must have documented experience and education and PMI has the right to audit your submission.

jearl2007
jearl2007

what about the net+...i think thats a definite top 10 cert !!!!!!

srmcevoy
srmcevoy

They helped me get my current job. I had 10 years experience in non-for-profit and spent 2 years trying to move to corporate work. It was only after I went back to college and did a condensed program and got certs that I lander a corporate job. Peace and Strength! Yours, learning to be Steven R. McEvoy http://mcevoysmusings.ca My Homepage http://bookreviewsandmore.ca My Blog CompTIA IT PRO, A+ ITT, A+ DT, A+ RST, Network+ Microsoft MCP, MCTS Business Desktop Deployment, MCTS Vista Configuration, MCITP Enterprise Support, MCITP Consumer Support, MOS, "The only reason for being a professional writer is that you can't help it." - Leo Rosten

charlie
charlie

"Many MCSEs and MCSAs hold their certifications on Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 platforms, meaning they???ve been working within the industry for many years." This cracked me up a little. My MCSE is in NT, earned in 1999 so I guess I have been in the industry a really REALLY long time. BTW - I find that the people who dump on MCSEs are those who hold no certs. I find a similar attitude by those who did not go to college toward those of us who did.

tkentopp
tkentopp

Speaking of internationally recognized credentials(ISO, etc.), cybersecurity will grow exponentially in importance. SANS is also vendor agnostic, but focused in a given competency, a perfect complement to the CISSP which is global in its approach.

kjmcsd
kjmcsd

Doesn't it seem like their are a million certs. for Sys. Admins. but not 5 for Software Developers. In the SW Dev. world Microsoft is really all their is as far as certs.

paul.doherty
paul.doherty

Including Linux+ instead of RHCE is a bit silly, IMO. And leaving out the VCP is a huge oversight.

djgardner
djgardner

"Sour grapes" is not tone of this post; think "Please Advise." Mid-forties IT worker with 20 years experience stuck in an IT support role at a small company that pays poorly. My worth is well documented and the proven management skills demonstrated have garnered attention and respect but nothing more. I have no current "certs" and with the current economy, no cash for testing fees let alone training. However, I expect to complete my Proj. Mngt. courses at the community college in March. If my employer does not "invest" in employee training and does not pay well, what are the options for this old-timer?

reid.kurvink
reid.kurvink

Erik .. I'm stunned by your list. It's essentially a "Microsoft-centric" view of IT - certainly not a enterprise view that represents design, management, or operations of IT environments. Where is ITIL or CobIT, or any of the Enterprise Architecture views? Where is virtualization or IT Outsource Management?

clelliot
clelliot

For many years, the CCP (Certified Computter Professional) was THE certification for IT folks. Has it dropped off everyone's radar?

Chug
Chug

Unfortunately I share the sentiment that I'm sure most have that the NetWare CNE is probably not worth much anymore and probably wouldn't recommend anyone trying to get certified in it these days, but... If I'm already CNE certified (NetWare 6) would it be worth listing on a resume? I don't have any other certifications. The specific certification may not be directly relevant anymore but still shows that I have a lot of skills required by many certifications (like general networking configuration and troubleshooting skills) and have put the effort in to the training.

pfbenapfl
pfbenapfl

I have been in the IT industry since 1973. About your vaunted certifications... Royal Crappola.

swade
swade

Although I agree that the PMP should be on this list, the writer incorrectly states that the PMP measures the ability to manage "technology projects". The PMP is NOT a technology focused designation, rather it recognizes the general skills required to manage projects across a broad scope of industries. The writer's comment reenforces the incorrect belief that PRoject Management is an IT discipline.

KnappIT
KnappIT

A simple search for "ITIL" on Dice.com or Monster.com will yield a zillion results. Employers are seeking candidates with their Foundation cert at least. And now that training budgets are getting cut, prospective employers are expecting you to have the cert before you walk in the door. Don't forget, folks: IT exists SOLELY to support the business. So yeah, knowing how to configure your boxes is obviously the most important, but we can't lose sight of what business objectives that particular server is helping support. When your IT department becomes too expensive / cumbersome / annoying, prepare to be outsourced. We have to run our IT shops like a business now, especially in this crappy economic downturn. (Yeah yeah, I'm an ITIL instructor, so of course I'm gonna say that ITIL is necessary. But I used to be an in-the-trenches server/LAN/WAN admin back in the day, and I've seen how applying just a few of the ITIL tenets can make lives so much easier.)

butkus
butkus

If you are looking for public education employment (NJ),forget certificates. Unless the State starts to require a district to have certified IT people, the Boards of Ed. will not give a hoot. A local discussion of large school tech directors seems to agree. You gain a big name certificate, or want the school to pay for the training, forget it. No pay increase would be forthcomming. A techer gets +15 credits or a masters, pay increase. I could have certifications covering the walls, my salary would not increase. I would bet most state Public Education systems are the same. But have the Student Information System go down or God forbid a laptop cart not work.... everyone is in a frenzie. Backup equipment...we can't afford that ! Not sure about Colleges.. but I bet some person working for the assistant coach gets paid better then their IT guys.

erh7771
erh7771

...certs were left off the list

djmentat
djmentat

Nice topic going on here. Of course everyone's cert. needs are going to be different for that person, but I thought I'd add my experience and thoughts. CompTIA certs. are definitely a foot in the door starting place. They are vendor netural and teach the basics of what you need to get started. And I have to hand it to the A+ hardware as it's one of the few that actually covers hardware. Not enough people know how to work with hardware. That said the A+ is the best place to start and from there you can get a job in the field, see where your interests lie from that point and then future certs. are based off of that. The next point is that do we even need other certs.? To get your foot in the door you do, but after that experience speaks much louder than certs. (they do help though). Personally my path was A+, N+, MCP, Associate of Applied Computer Science. But from here I've trained on everything for the MCSE on Server 2003, but never tested for it due to lack of cash at the time of completition of the courses. The experience of working with it every day is more impressive on a resume though. But now that we're considering a Vista upgrade, I've taken the Vista course and trying to decide whether or not to pay for and take the exam. Also about to start the Server 2008 courses to prepare for upgrading my network from 2003 to 2008 and wondering if I want to pay for the exams. However once I'm done with these I'll be taking the VMware, CCNA, and CEH courses. These I have no doubt that I'll be paying for the exams, as the certs are pretty much necessary for my career path. I have a buddy of mine that went to 3 months of college and dropped out. He was working with computers and networking and kept to it without ever getting a single cert. He was making 6 figures a year b/f starting his own firm. In conclusion, everyone's different in this matter. Some certs. are good to get your foot in the door. Some are good to take the class and learn it, but as long as you know the material and work with it every day the experience speaks louder than the piece of paper. And there are some higher level certs. that are worth paying the money for to be able to move into working in that area. But then again, if you're a PC genius and can demonstrate it you don't need any.

diane.finn
diane.finn

where is ITIL, CMM and six sigma?? this is list is just for developers...what about the rest of us?

alecia.brent
alecia.brent

It depends on what you want to do in near future. But IT Certifications coupled with field experience and/or related degrees are an excellent and sometimes essential means to get professional success. Many organizations and technical staffing [www.gtssminds.com/] services have found certified technicians to be more productive than their noncertified counterparts. I have an MCSE and that has worked well for me. I think that the security field and Cisco are always safe. Start with A+ and Network +, and then go through MCSA/MCSE. MCSE is pretty much MCSA but with 2 more exams. Right now we are in a declining job market for this sector but I don't think that means it will stay that way.

charlie
charlie

And now your a cert junkie! :-)

tkentopp
tkentopp

If you want a focus based on the human condition, without the vendor "Koolaid", give SANS a try. (You'll never turn back!)

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

In development. Either trivial dreck that you can pick up up off help or intellisense or simple algorithms they manage well enough in academia. I've done the Visual Studio ones, good job I already knew how to program, because it wasn't in the course....

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

It seems this list is stuck in 2000. How about an updated list for 2009?

rs
rs

Old timer at 40+, don't be silly, you've years to go to join the rest of us. And I don't regard myself as an old-timer, but as having loads of valuable experience. I have been an IT pro since 1973 and freelance since 1981 (don't bother with the maths I am 53). Almost 100% of my work has been by recomendation with companies that have managers with enough guts to stand up to the HR dollies whose keyword searches don't pick up people like me. With such an amount of experience "What do you do" is the toughest question anyone can ask. In the UK ageism is illegal which improves the chances. Some companies (particularly in retail) are recognising the value of experience. Perhaps in these tough times hirers will finally realise that someone with enough experience to get up to speed quickly and work without supervision is a valuable resource. And I am a long way off being pushed around in a bath chair - ask my kids. Keep at it! I am an optimist by nature and believe that common sense must one day have an impact. Roy (www.roysharp.com)

CarlosHawes
CarlosHawes

It also totally ignores the LAMP leaning Web 2.0 world as well as the huge dominance of Open Source Software on anything cloud based. It would be a very good list for the mid 1990's however. Sort of like hiring Seinfeld to pitch your new OS: good idea, just 10 years too late :)

dsmith32837
dsmith32837

We were legacy main-frame folks and the ICCP was our only way to prove our basic computer & systems knowledge. Today everyone is an 'EXPERT'?

djmentat
djmentat

I'd go ahead and list it as it does show that you've studied and worked hard and achieved a technical certification, and having any experience to back it up is good to show that you've used your education. Novell NDS won't be around, or at lest supported, much longer but I'd still include it on your resume as part of work history and education. It can't hurt you.

CarlosHawes
CarlosHawes

Yup, list definitely written by a 'softie. It is a good list if you plan to work in a small it shop servicing desktops and small departmental servers (or if you plan to time warp back to 1997). If you plan to work in a large data center with some high end systems, the list is nearly worthless. Move the Linux+ cert WAY up the list, add on an Oracle OCP and some Solaris and Java Certs as well as Apache, mySQL, PHP, and Ruby. And news to Erik, Windows HAS been displaced in the area in which I began my IT career. My first Oracle databases 12 years ago were all Windows NT hosted. Now, any serious IT shop has them on HP-UX, Solaris, or Red Hat Linux. And if you haven't noticed, Web 2.0 is heavily LAMP based. Windows is being rapidly displaced there.

LarryD4
LarryD4

Local school Districts have begun to open the wallets and hire some smart technololgy directors and are even starting to pay a comparable salary. But that still gets stuck in the quagmire of Board of Politicts. I have seen a lot of wives and relatives getting those jobs. But as schools have major problems with web sites, grading and report card systems, and overall data management. They have started to hire higher paying tech analysts and supoprt people. On the other hand some forgo all of that and just out source.

user support
user support

I switched into the IT field about 8 yrs ago when a co-worker suggested I apply for an opening in the IT shop. At the time I was working toward a degree in Business Management which I obtained. I also helped other employees with their pc hardware and software related issues because there weren't enough IT staff to help out. I joined Tech Republic to keep in touch with what other IT professionals are doing. Do a lot of computer based training offered by the company, take outside training when available and do a lot of outside reading. There are people in this organization that have IT degrees and certifications that do so strictly to get more money. There are others who see it as a way to get knowledge and satisfy their goals. Like beauty, the value of the degree or certification is in the eye of the beholder.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I've got to agree. The thing when you get to over a decade experience, or two for me, is to aim at the right market. There's no point going for the two years + jobs, not only do they not want us, they don't feel they need us, so they won't pay. If it doesn't say they want experience, I don't bother with it. There's been enough out there to keep me in work since 1981 and I don't expect that to change. All a cert will do is cost you a lot of money so you can do a junior role and take a pay cut.

Editor's Picks