iPhone

Top 10 alternatives to the iPhone


A few weeks ago, I wrote about 10 reasons not to buy an iPhone, at least not yet. Several people responded, saying, "Okay, you've convinced me -- but what should I get instead?" Good question! In this article, we'll take a look at a few alternatives that provide some advantages over the iPhone in its current incarnation. Phone manufacturers are coming out with new models all the time, so this represents only a sampling of the many available alternatives to the iPhone.

Note: This information is also available as a PDF download.

#1: HTC Touch/Vogue

One of the iPhone's big selling points is the touchscreen. But it's not the only phone on the market that offers one of those. The HTC Touch (GSM) and its sister phone, the Vogue (CDMA), are at the top of the list of iPhone lookalikes. The Vogue is slated to be released by Sprint in November, dubbed -- somewhat confusingly -- the Sprint Touch.

In addition to the touchiness of their screens, these phones have the same sort of large screen as the iPhone, and the interface looks very similar. They run Windows Mobile 6 Professional and include Wi-Fi support. They have a 2-megapixel camera built in, like the iPhone. The GSM version runs on the EDGE network like the iPhone, but the Vogue is rumored to be able to provide true 3G speeds on the EVDO Rev A network.

#2: Nokia N95

Another potential iPhone killer, the Nokia N95 does most of what Apple's phone does, and more. With a 2.8 QVGA screen and 8 GB of internal memory, it gives the iPhone a run for its money. And it outdoes Apple's offering when it comes to the integrated GPS with Nokia maps and the 5-megapixel camera with Carl Zeiss optics. You can shoot DVD-quality videos up to 30 frames per second, and there's a TV-out port so you can play those videos on a full size television set.

The Nokia Web browser with Mini Map lets you zoom out to a full screen view of a Web page and then zoom back in to the area you want to read, with the text automatically adjusting.

The Nokia is an impressive phone. The bad news: It's not currently available in the United States. It also doesn't include a hardware QWERTY keyboard, which some say is the biggest drawback of the iPhone.

#3: Nokia N99 (maybe)

For at least the last nine months, cell phone enthusiasts have eagerly anticipated the release of the Nokia N99. There are photos of a prototype all over the Web, and the specs are enough to wow anybody (and put the iPhone to shame): 16 GB of internal memory, a 3.2-inch screen, a 9-way joystick control, GPS, WLAN, and a 7.2-megapixel camera. And it has the QWERTY keyboard that the N95 and the iPhone lack.

But the bad news about this one is even worse: It's not available (as of this writing) anywhere. Patents are on file, though, and phone fans continue to hope. You can at least see what it's expected to look like.

#4: Blackberry Pearl

This is not your father's Blackberry (or even your big brother's). A far cry from the clunky, somewhat awkward mobile e-mail devices first introduced by RIM, the Pearl is sleek, slim, and pretty, and its phone functionality works just as well as its text -- something that couldn't be said for the first BB phones.

The Pearl 8100 is the first Blackberry that offers a full set of multimedia features. It comes with only 64 MB of memory and the screen is small and supports only 65,536 colors (as opposed to the 1.6 million claimed for the N99), but it weighs only 3.1 ounces, too.

You get a QWERTY keyboard, 1.3-megapixel camera, BlackBerry Maps, Web browser, media player, and organizer for storing and synching contacts and calendar information. With a two-year contract from AT&T, the online price is $249, a bit less than the iPhone even with its infamous price cut.

#5: Palm Treo 700/750

Once upon a time, the Palm Pilot was the PDA to own, especially in the business world. As handheld computers and cell phones merged, Palm lost a lot of the market, but many folks still consider the Palm to be the best.

Whether you like the Palm OS or Windows Mobile, there's a Treo for you. The 700 runs the Palm OS and runs on the fast EVDO network. The 750 runs Windows Mobile. With a two-year contract and online discount, either model will set you back $399 from AT&T (750) or Verizon (700) at the time of this writing.

Whichever one you choose, you'll be able to do something that iPhone owners can't do: install additional applications to enhance the functionality of your phone. Find out more about both on the Palm Smartphones page.

#6: Samsung Blackjack

The BlackJack is a quad-band world phone that takes advantage of the high speed of AT&T's HSDPA 3G network. The screen is small, taking up less than half of the phone surface, but the QWERTY keypad is correspondingly large. It runs Windows Mobile 5, supports Microsoft Direct Push e-mail, and includes a 1.3-megapixel camera/camcorder (but lacks a flash).

It's relatively light and thin (3.5 ounces, .46 inches) and supports Java-based games, unlike many of its WM 5 competitors. Best of all, with a two-year contract and $99 mail-in rebate, the price works out to only $99.

#7: LG Voyager

At the time of this writing, Verizon had just announced four new phones, and the one that seems to be getting most of the press is the LG Voyager. It definitely has that iPhone look, with a nice big screen and black and silver finish. It's thicker than the iPhone but that's because it includes a hardware QWERTY keyboard. And unlike the slider keyboards on many competitors, this one flips open.

Verizon's EVDO network means your Internet access will be a lot faster than the iPhone's on EDGE, and the Voyager has a user-friendly battery you can remove and replace yourself. (That's a major complaint about the iPhone.) You can also get GPS navigation if you sign up for Verizon's nav service, and a 2-megapixel camera rounds out the package. It's expected to become available in November and cost around $250. See a photo here.

#8: Samsung i760

Users of the Samsung i730 (I'm one of them) have been waiting a long time for its successor, the i760. We saw it first at CES last January, and the Verizon reps there told us it should be out sometime in July. Summer came and went, and we're still waiting. I love my i730, but I would also love to get my hands on the new and improved version.

The i760 sports two keypads -- an external number keypad on the front of the phone and a side-slide QWERTY for more serious typing. It's expected to run Windows Mobile 6 and will have Wi-Fi support like the i730. It's a tad slimmer and lighter, too.

I'm not the only one who's passed up several other tempting new phones because I'm saving myself for the i760. I hope Verizon doesn't let us down.

#9: Samsung F700

While Verizon's been dragging its feet on releasing the i760 (or anything else running Windows Mobile 6), Samsung has been hard at work producing more new phones. One of these is the F700, which looks a lot like an iPhone but also features a slide-out QWERTY keyboard.

It features a 5-megapixel camera and will work on the high speed (7.2 Mbps) HSDPA network. It's not yet available from any U.S. carriers, but it's definitely one of the most iPhone-like clones we've seen. If it becomes available, I just might give up on waiting for the i760. You can see some photos here.

#10: The ultimate cell phone

If none of the above tickles your fancy, and if you carry a cell phone purely as a status symbol, consider this alternative: a phone from Goldvish Luxury Communications, in a solid gold case encrusted with diamonds. These little ditties don't surf the Net any faster than the phones we've mentioned here, yet some of them sell for more than a million dollars. Now that's a status symbol.


Debra Littlejohn Shinder is a technology consultant, trainer and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. These include Scene of the Cybercrime: Computer Forensics Handbook, published by Syngress, and Computer Networking Essentials, published by Cisco Press. She is co-author, with her husband, Dr. Thomas Shinder, of Troubleshooting Windows 2000 TCP/IP, the best-selling Configuring ISA Server 2000, and ISA Server and Beyond.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

33 comments
dcrowell
dcrowell

My favorite iPhone feature is the web browser. Having instant access to the Internet is important at this phase of my life. Are there any other cell phones that have comparable browsers? Every other phone I have seen has a partial view of web pages and/or distorts them significantly. If the iPhone had a Flash player I would be a happier customer.

mats.arvendal
mats.arvendal

I have a HTC touch (#1 on the list) and have tried Nokia N95 (#2) as well as Iphone. And I would not recommend any of these as an alternative to Iphone. This due to the extremly bad designed GUIs on these phones. HTC touch also suffers from low end hardware. I will easily switch to Iphone (when it released here).

rrorge
rrorge

I can not believe that you have missed out the HTC Tytn 2, the best phone in the Universe (IMO)

maurlife
maurlife

AND the TyTN II is being marketed as the "Tilt" in the US by the same carrier as introduced the iPhone: ATT. In spite of that, and their clunky stock version of the OS (Windows Mobile 6 Professional)and ATT Crapware it comes with, is still the most capable, features-rich PDA PPC Phone available. With a little tinkering, and a few third-party apps, it becomes a serious power-tool, which is compatible with the needs and infrastructures of both small and large businesses, unlike the iPhone. Like the iPhone, it also has a large community of enthusiastic users. Unlike the iPhone, the Windows Mobile platform has been opened up to independent developers for years. This has resulted in a rich diversity of resources and choices for users, both from companies selling software, and communities of users and enthusiasts.

cpe.grimm
cpe.grimm

A little more research would have brought you to the Open Source Linux based cell phone prize. The Neo1973 is the first phone designed to run OpenMoko. It is a phone that can be used with any GSM operator, and it is manufactured by FIC who instigated the OpenMoko project. Now you have the power of choice. What will you do with it?

Resuna
Resuna

It's not about the OS, it's about the applications. What's the killer application for Linux on a phone?

cpe.grimm
cpe.grimm

Whatever you want it to be. It is open source so you can develop your own applications or install ones that other people have written. All that without having to be beholden to a certain provider. The complete development will not be finished till late this year early next, but it will be a WiFi capable GSM phone with all the features you already have and then some. Check out openmoko.org for more information.

si
si

This article is horribly slanted, while all the phones (that exist) do some things better than an iPhone, can you honestly say that any of these do 'everything' better? I doubt it. #1 Ok, this phone can use 3G CDMA networks, what about the rest of the phone? And what happens when I am in Europe? #2 From personal experience, this phone doesn't live up to the hype (3 returns and counting). And what does "DVD-quality video" mean? Are you suggesting that Hollywood can happily toss there Panavision kit and switch to using this phone? Bit rate and quality are not the same thing. #3 Ooo look, the iPhone doesn't match up to a non-existant phone - sublimely ridiculous. #4 Don't know which Pearl you have been using but I've never seen one with a qwerty keyboard, maybe you mean the Curve. The one everyone I know with a Pearl wished they had got instead. #5 Ignoring the obvious form factor comparison, the only benefit you state is 3G CDMA performance. What about UMTS? #6 Supports UTMS 3G but can you really put this phone in the same market as the iPhone? Would this appeal to the market that Apple have chosen to market to? etc... (getting into phones I am not familiar with ;-) To be honest, none of these phones are really aimed at the same market as the iPhone. The iPhone is convergence of iPod and phone, created by the constant demand for such from iPod users. This market isn't going to jump at any of the devices presented here because the are phones with add-ons for media playing rather then a media player with a phone added. What amazes me is the negative emations that the iPhone seems to generate - it is just a phone/media player combo! It may be exactly what you want (as many do). The fact it is not perfect (wow, surprise) means that there are many for whom the device does not tick the right boxes - but that is not a reason to slag off the entire iPhone concept. Still makes me laugh that the "Apple hardware is expensive" myth still lives. Compare their PCs (like for like spec) with any major windows box seller and you will find that their pricing is very competative - they don't produce bargain basement hardware. Likewise, a comparison of the iPhone price is misleading as the cost of phone plus contract over the contract length (the real cost) is pretty competative too.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Apple is a trend setter, all the power to them. Their i-Pods seriously lack sound quality, volume, equalization, have a proprietary battery. Their i-Phone is a crossover wannabe for kiddies, not even college students would benefit. It's a toy and only a toy. Just as they made all the i-Pod 'proprietary' accssories, they hope to do the same with i-Phone. It simply doesn't have the same marketplace though. When compared to a standard CELL phone, basic camera, phone book etc. plays some vid, it's a fair comparisson. Compared to a smartphone, it is a hideous piece of junk. I think that they are being compared to smart phones here, which is sorta like comparing Polk speakers to a Mordaunt-Short loudspeaker. Polk is cheap, overhyped product, made in Mexico and uses low end crossovers and goofy drivers, Mordaunt-Short uses high quality capacitors, custom furniture quality cabinetry and 40 years of British speaker engineering/design. Two completely different worlds, but the marketing and hype behind Polk makes them seem unique and European, while most people haven't even heard of Mordaunt-Short. The way I check product is that the more people that are selling it, the more you have to ignore the hype, especially when it comes to big box stores. Actually I should have used the Bose example, they have the craftiest, most misleading marketing and inaccurate specs in the industry. You get my point though, one is a low end toy made popular purely by marketing, not performance. The other is a quality product designed for usability that has little marketing but for word of mouth from happy customers

Resuna
Resuna

By keeping the position and pinout of the connectors reasonably stable, and keeping the form factor similar, Apple has been able to create a market for accessories. No other MP3 player manufacturer has bothered to keep their designs close enough to build up any kind of market for anything that needs more than a headphone jack. On the other hand I've had to use adaptors just so I could use the same power brick on two different Nokia phones... and that's just a *power* connector. The accessory connectors, well, I've accumulated half a dozen of those. If Apple sticks to a single design in the iPhone maybe the other companies will get a clue. Nah, who am I kidding, no cellphone company is that smart.

Resuna
Resuna

Don't be silly. The only "non proprietary" interfaces to any MP3 player are: * The headset jack on the player. * The USB port on your computer. The iPod has both of these interfaces, and is 100% compatible with all accessories for all other players. So when you write "With i-Pod you require a special i-Pod addapter/dock in your audio system to pipe it through your car or home stereo. With most MP3 players, you simply need 1/8" phono to RCA connectors and you can use it with a 10 year old stereo system." I have no bloody idea where you got that from: the same dangly dongles using the phono jack work just as well with the iPod as any other player. HAVE YOU ACTUALLY LOOKED AT AN IPOD? Ever? You don't need to get iPod-only accessories. On the other hand, when you get a Creative Zen, you could (theoretically) find Zen-only accessories... but they don't exist because Creative changes the port layout and the shape of the player every time, so there's no incentive for manufacturers to build dongles that snap on the Zen. Creative could even create a "proprietary ecosystem" for their players just by keeping the headphone and USB ports a fixed distance from each other, and providing a positive lock snap next to them, and committing to keeping that layout... so people could make "Creative" accessories with standard ports that only worked with their devices. But they don't do it? Why? The only thing I can figure, after looking at their products over the past several years, is that they're just plain stupid. Same with Sony and the rest of them. They look at the popularity of the iPod and make all kinds of wrong assumptions about why it's popular. Batteries, now. ALL MP3 players (and, in fact, all devices) that use Li-Ion batteries use proprietary ones. I prefer Li-Ion, so I've had several MP3 players now, only two of which were iPods, and all of them required surgery to replace the batteries. Apple makes it unreasonably hard to replace them yourself, but you can, and once you've got the bloody case open it's no different than any other. Yes, some MP3 players use Ni-Cad or Alkaline batteries. Not all do. Apple doesn't happen to make any that do, other companies have a bigger range of products, but that's Apple. They don't generally make much of a range of products in any product line. That's why I don't tend to use an iPod myself. I don't happen to like the click-wheel or the touch-screen. I don't like smartphones, so I won't buy the iPhone. But I'm not going to see evil in a company doing something that's good for their customers, like maintaining the same form factor and connectors over a long period of time. You write "If you want to use the same power adapters.car chargers, just buy products that use the same connectors. Personally, I wouldn't bother, if i wanted a new device with a different pinout, who cares, it's the device I'm interested in, not the pinout for the adapters." then in the very next sentence you write "This means they build a monopoly on their accessories, quality can be whatever they want to, because there are no competing products, pricing can be set as high as they want, because there are no competing products." Why is the same behavior laudable in cellphone manufacturers (though they have not been quite as consistent as you claim) and reprehensible when they're making MP3 players? Simply because nobody else has bothered to try and keep their MP3 players compatible with each other in the layout of ports and the shape of the case from one version to the next? "if you buy Apple, you must continue to buy Apple." Funny, I've had an iPod and an iPod shuffle and I'm not feeling locked in. What's more interesting is that here I am, I don't even LIKE the iPod much, and I'm defending it against someone who's actually upset about the possibility of getting locked into a "proprietary ecosystem". What exactly are you upset about?

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

And it's proprietary, that's the whole downside. Proprietary formats force the user to continue buying overpriced products from the original manufacturer, or in the case of new receivers, buying the rights to offer a dock in your own products. With the i-POD they use a proprietray battery, it dies and you need to buy a new, Apple proprietary battery. With other MP3 players, they use AA or AAA batteries, you canbuy cheap ones in a pinch, buy quality rechargeables that last a lot longer than Apples etc. With i-Pod you require a special i-Pod addapter/dock in your audio system to pipe it through your car or home stereo. With most MP3 players, you simply need 1/8" phono to RCA connectors and you can use it with a 10 year old stereo system. As for Cell phones and cell phone connectors, I have had 3 Nokias that all use the same power adapter, I now have 2 completely different Motorola products that also use the same adapters. If you want to use the same power adapters.car chargers, just buy products that use the same connectors. Personally, I wouldn't bother, if i wanted a new device with a different pinout, who cares, it's the device I'm interested in, not the pinout for the adapters. YOu seem to ave missed my poit, which was directed at proprietary products that suck consumers into continuing to buy more proprietary products, if you buy Apple, you must continue to buy Apple. This means they build a monopoly on their accessories, quality can be whatever they want to, because there are no competing products, pricing can be set as high as they want, because there are no competing products. Its just a very common scam.

mark
mark

My wife and I both switched to the 755p from Sprint and love it. The promo price came out to $279 after a $100 rebate. Don't know if that is still being offered. Expandable using up to 4GB mini-SD card. Comes with Palm software for Mac and Windows. I love my Macbook Pro, but the iPhone is not robust enough for me yet. Now the iPod touch is another story...

jeezmah
jeezmah

There appears to be a migration by cell phone manufacturers to the Windows Mobile operating system, except for one notable player, Nokia with the S60 (which I like and find to be a very stable operating system after using E61i.) Due to my favorable experience with the E-series, I would definitely consider upgrading to an N-series smartphone.

Resuna
Resuna

#11 Plain Old cellphone. Get a plain old cellphone and enjoy longer battery life and greater reliability, and save money to boot. I mean, for Bell's sake people, IT'S JUST A PHONE.

wolvie3421
wolvie3421

I think the Sony Ericsson M600i is the most under rated phone on the market for the last 2 years.

jkiernan
jkiernan

This article's not very helpful. Phones 1, 2, 3, 7, 8 and 9 aren't available yet or at all in the U.S., and 10 is a joke. Since I can easily buy an iPhone today, what are my realistic alternatives? I would like to see video recording and cut'n'paste added at some point to the iPhone, but otherwise it's elegant and very functional.

dave
dave

I agree the article is not very helpful. The first problem is the article seems to be U.S.A.-centric, it took me a moment to figure that out. A disclaimer would be nice since this is not a regional medium (the internet). The second problem is that the article includes vaporware, so by definition these are not alternatives to the iphone. However, phones phones 1 and 2 are definitely "available". Maybe not subsidized through U.S. carriers, but readily available for purchase. For real alternatives to the iPhone, I would add these items (all GSM): Touch-Screen: * Motorola MING (A1200/A1200r), quad-band GDM, mini PDA phone runs on Linux/Java, handwriting recognition, RealPlayer, business card reader, 2MP camera, MS-Office/PDF document readers, MSN messenger, stereo-bluetooth. Predates the iPhone over one year. This phone was major influence on the iPhone (the iPhone interface does improve on the Ming's shortcomings alot). Cool clear plexiglass flip-cover. Retails

JamesRL
JamesRL

I just got my business phone upgraded to a Motorola Q. It has a qwerty keyboard, Windows Mobile, syncs with Exchange servers, my contact list and calendar. Actually don't think I will use it for mail, but I do like having my calendar and contact list with me at all times. I used to carry around a Palm pilot and my phone, and this is certainly better. It does do other things like webbrowsing, plays music etc., but doubt I will use it much. James

adamtorres
adamtorres

Since when did the Pearl start coming with a QWERTY keyboard? The BB Curve is far better. It does actually have a QWERTY keyboard and a camera with higher megapixels. For business usage, the BB 8830 with EVDO would be my choice.

GoldfishZero99
GoldfishZero99

I have a Blackjack and admittedly some of my friends who bought an iphone are jealous of it. They mostly bought it for the music capabilities (which they think fall short) and they think as a phone / mobile device the iphone is just weak.

major.malfunction
major.malfunction

Spring Mogul by HTC I've had it about a month now. And my neighbor has an iPhone. The only feature I want from the iPhone would be the ability to fit the entire web page into the window and then zoom to what I want. Other than that, my Mogul is heads and shoulders above the iPhone. Windows Mobile 6; up to 2MB WAN speed; I can tether it to my laptop as a broadband modem - the iPhone you CANNOT!; 2MP camera with video; Windows registy is so easy to hack to enhance and supe up the features of the phone; microSD slot up to 4GB - i just bought a 2GB with a USB reader for $22; plays movies, music, and games with ease; battery life has been fantastic; slide out keyboard, portrait/landscape mode automatic if you slide out the keyboard; Microsoft Exchange integrated; 802.11b wireless with ease; can charge with USB cable; touch screen with a stylus; voice recognition; voice recorder; picture/video mail (but only after a quick hack of the registry even though Sprint says it comes with the phone - it DOES NOT and neither does the iPhone); buttons all over it and a wheel so you can operate it with one hand; and bluetooth. Cons: Windows Mobile needs a LOT of help out of the box. For instance, opening a program and the closing it by the X in the upper right hand corner like in Windows XP doesn't actually close it. It stays running in the background and it eats up memory. you need to get a 3rd party program to handle that. What a simple thing, but completely lacking in Windows Mobile!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I love it! What a great tool for the phone. I have the HTC P-4000 on Telus, Sprint's was limited to GPS but no touch screen in Canada. Telus has touch but no GPS, I pretty much know my way around, so mapquest to zero in helps a lot more than true GPS would. The 2nd gen EVDO rocks compared to teh Sprint network too. Though I prefer Sprint as a company and as my primary phone carrier, this one is paid for by the company so they can deal with Telus and I just get the extra speed.

jkiernan
jkiernan

Maybe I misread your post, but the iPhone does let you email pictures. It doesn't record video yet.

Jaqui
Jaqui

nothing but reasons to avoid those phones like the plague. a cell phone should: make and receive phone calls have a phone book for frequently called numbers everything else is grounds to reject the device.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

A PDA should not be used as a cell phone, a laptop should not be used as a PDA. How far do we go 'un'integrating technology before it is simple enough? I agree that the i-Phone is a piece of pure garbage, just as the i-Pos doesn't play back music as well as other MP3 players, it's Apple hype and shite. I have a cel phone, few years old thta I use as my primary phone. For business, I use an HTC P-400, and it's really f'in cool!! I choose NOT to use it for my email, but coule, it runs Win Mobile6 (I know you hate Win)and has a touch screen that changes aspect ratio when the keyboard is slid out, it's actually pretty handy. The touch screen has EXCELLENT text to type recognition, it even figures out quick jotted handwriting that isn't in line. EX. YOu can write 'Hello' with 'there' written on top or sideways and it figrues out to type 'Hello there'. For quick notes while on the road, seeing a possible customer's van and etting the web address and contact info down in traffic, it is the cats arse. Although the same unit has been limited in the US marketplace, by carriers shutting down the tech, it works well up here. As for the phone part, I still prefer my cell phone, but it doesn't have anywhere near the contact retention the HTC does. My HTC holds an entire database, I can run my CRM software on it and sync it (no NOT Outlook, though you couldl if you wanted to). There are purposes for these devices, I didn't like using two or three devices to run my work day, now I use my notebook then sync it and go. Mapquest, Google Earth, contacts, notes and hey, it DOES play Video and MP3's and has several downloadable musc enhancements for Windws Media player to make it sound okay too. Cool device, recommend it to anyone needing an all-in-one device. Again I agree, the i-phone is just a toy worthy of throwing away but not all devices are as useless as Apple's.

eclypse
eclypse

Most of the cell phones I've had the misfortune of using lately are horrible. I avoid using my cell phone at all costs because I hate it so much (company provided LG VX8300, have to keep). It is uncomfortable to hold, the sound quality is terrible, it's just a poor excuse for a phone. All the other junk on it is just crap I never use because you can't get the photos off of it (they charge you or the service doesn't work), can't transfer contacts easily (Verizon wants to charge you for that too), I don't want to take pictures, I don't want to listen to music, just basically too much crap to put up with when all I want is a quality phone. The only good feature that they have added to these new phones is the speakerphone functionality. It's nice to be able to put it down on the desk, talk to whomever, and be able to work on your computer to fix their problem (or yours). The calendar features on some phones might be nice, but most phones are only compatible if you run Windows, so that makes 99% of cell phones even more worthless to me - especially Crackberries. Forcing me to use Windows is my grounds for rejecting something. In this day and time, there are enough open standards to choose from that there is no reason to tie users to Micro$oft anymore. Maybe someday someone will port Pine to a mobile phone... =)

PoconoChuck
PoconoChuck

I am Samsung BlackJack / i607 user. Yes, of course, Jaqui is correct it must be a phone, first. And a phone book. But having a calendar (and phone book) that easily syncs with my desktop is an immense plus. Hardly a reason to reject it.

Jaqui
Jaqui

it is a reason to reject it. I keep all my sceduling in my head, I don't want calendar, im, webbrowsing, camera, email etc in a phone.

panzrwagn
panzrwagn

Without my Blackberry Email, and associated apps this morning I would have got up at 4:30 to be in the office by 6AM. As it is, I have done 90 minutes of work, responded to 4 emails with my boss and his boss, sent out 3 others, was on a conference call. I am now going to work out, will skip morning traffic, and still be on time for a 9AM meeting. I kinda like having all those features.

eric.sorrentino
eric.sorrentino

the rest of us though have schedules which are too busy to manitain via memory, do use a calendar, communicate via IM and text, find the idea of being able to pull up a web page anywhere to be a GOOD thing, and like not having to fire up a computer to get our email. So, you'll forgive us if we dismiss your opinion of a phone which does more than make phone calls as nothing but background noise.

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