Leadership

How does the iPhone 4 affect the smartphone market and business users?

Will Apple's iPhone 4 put more distance between it and the other smartphone competitors? What affect will video calling have on its success? Read some of the analyst's opinions and share your own thoughts on the week's announcements.

This week's announcement of the next-generation iPhone 4 revealed attractive new features, but how will it affect business users? Things like camera upgrades, the Netflix app, and Gyroscope are designed to excite consumers, but will all the bells and whistles add up to a surge in business use or possibly the opposite, especially with Google's Android coming on strong? AT&T's clamping down on data usage with a 2G cap might dampen enthusiasm for those who would be heavy users, as ZDNet's Sam Diaz sees it:

With caps in place, customers will have to monitor their usage, just as they've done in the past with voice minutes. There's one big difference, though - average consumers grow up with an understanding of time and therefore have a sense of how to track voice minutes. Same goes with things like gasoline. We know about how many miles/kilometers we can travel on a single gallon/liter of fuel - and our cars come with built-in gauges so we can keep track of what's left in the tank.

Data usage is a bit trickier.

Depending on one's business, FaceTime, the video calling feature, could be the "killer app" that sets the iPhone apart from competitors. As analyst Charlie Wolf told ZDNet's David Morgenstern, "FaceTime is going to be an app that makes this phone unique for quite a while. The overall impression of the competitors, Microsoft or [Google] Android, is that they are a generation or an upgrade cycle behind the iPhone." But not everyone is so optimistic, as demonstrated in this excerpt from a report on Telegraph.co.uk:

Outside Apple, however, video calling has historically met with a mixed reception. Whether its from application developers such as Fring today, Skype or countless other attempts over the years, it has yet to catch on. Adam Leach is principal analyst at Ovum: "We shouldn't get too excited that it's going to be an overnight success," he says. "Look at video calling's long and miserable history - it was supposed to be the killer apps third-generation networks, but people generally don't use it. Behaviourally consumers have never really shown much interest."

Do you think Apple is going to be the company that gets video calling right and pushes it into the mainstream? How much of its success is dependent on network providers?

I've included some of the video from WWDC, if you want to see a little demo of some of these features.

Video calling

Netflix on the iPhone

Camera features

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

5 comments
travis.duffy
travis.duffy

How is it going to put more distance between it and other competitors in the business market when it is not the leader in the first place? You talking as if the iphone is the leader and it clearly is not. Blackberry is the leader.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

Wouldn't allow them to access their networks. It has been proven time and time again that apple's iphone is very insecure and full of security vulnerabilities. Just look at what recently happened with the ipad http://gawker.com/5559346/ The iphone's encryption is terrible and can be cracked in under 5 minutes giving a malicious user access to ALL information stored on the device regardless of how strong or long the password is.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... but the only reason RIM is still the sales leader in the US is because they're selling 2-for-1 at bargain-basement prices. Who wouldn't want two Blackberries for $29? Maybe the people who want something they can actually use? Blackberries, even the Bold models, are not noted for their ease of use.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

First off, iOS 4 addresses almost exactly the drawbacks you blame on previous versions, and this article is discussing iOS4 as well as the phone itself. Secondly, the article you link to [i]specifically states that an AT&T database was hacked, NOT the iPad itself.[/i] This again nullifies your argument against the iPad as a non-secure product. Finally, your last statement references a [i]jailbroken[/i] iphone, whose security was already compromised by the act of jailbreaking. As yet, there has been no viable crack of an unmodified iPhone that did more than display the contents of a low-level database--and that was during the Pwn-to-Own competition and is not in the wild.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

is because they offer a TRUE enterprise solution with the security and manageability that Enterprises require. Something that is not available with the iphone. Show me data where Blackberry is not #1 in business. Every report shows that even though apple has taken market share from RIM, they are still the leader. Since when was the iphone the end all be all device you can actually use? Sorry, but the iphone and it's touch screen keyboard are nothing more than JUNK when trying to use on the go. Not noted for ease of use??? Tell me what is so hard about using a Blackberry. I find it way less complicated than these finicky touch screen devices on the market!