Apple

Paper: The hot new app for the iPad

The Paper app is the new, hot thing for iPads. Get an idea of what it is and watch an interview with one of its developers, Georg Petschnigg.

Fast on the heels of popular app Draw Something, another app that is getting a lot of buzz for the iPad is Paper. Paper, released yesterday, is a creation of a company called Fifty Three, notable because it features many of the team who worked on Microsoft's ill-fated Courier tablet project. The Verge has done an extensive review piece on the app's evolution as well as an interview with Fifty Three developer Georg Petschnigg (who also worked on Microsoft Office), which I've embedded below.

So, what is Paper? The app allows you to capture your ideas as diagrams, sketches, drawings, or handwritten notes. The description touts its minimalist design -- there are no extensive menus and no settings to tinker with -- nothing to get between you and your inner Van Gogh. If you're like me, and can't draw a convincing stick figure, however, this may not be a good thing. The "free" version comes only with the Draw Tool, so if you want to Sketch, Outline, Color, or Write, those are $1.99 a pop. Other than just a way to demo the app, it might preclude a lot of grumbling, simply to sell it with all the essential tools included for $7.99. A lot of people will spring for that. Paper is compatible with iPads, iOS 4.3 and later. It also allows streaming pages to Tumblr, sending them via email, and sharing on Facebook and Twitter.

If you want a little more background about the genesis of the design and to hear Petschnigg talk about how the app might evolve, see the video interview below:

About

Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

1 comments
Too-Tired Techie
Too-Tired Techie

Major paper manufacturers are shaking in their boots... Wood pulp suppliers are extremely worried, and environmentalists are rejoicing - it's the end of paper - except in the bathroom.

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