iPhone

Three reasons iPhones are better for business users

Erik Eckel believes iPhones are the best smartphones for business users, citing easy configuration, security, and app support. See if you agree with his reasons ormake a case for your own recommendation.

Clients ask all the time what I think of their smartphones. Committed by multi-year contracts that ultimately run several thousand dollars and outlast some marriages, they want to hear they chose wisely. Unless they chose an iPhone, I don't have much to say.

That's the truth. To tell you anything else would be a disservice to them, you and this space. What's important is why I prefer the iPhone, and the reasons have nothing to do with drinking Apple's Kool-Aid, being "arty" or wanting to look "cool." I'm too busy for that stuff.

My office supports several hundred commercial clients. We've deployed, configured and troubleshot BlackBerries, Droids, Treos, iPhones and others. Having had to manage email, synchronize calendars, support contacts, configure music and photos, enable video transfer and fix stubborn Smartphone applications more times than I can count, we've learned a few things along the way.

#1. Easier email configuration

J. D. Power ranked the iPhone number one according to the results of a business survey. Ease of operation was a major contributing factor. That's no surprise to me. My engineers and I can configure an iPhone to synchronize email, contacts and calendar information with a properly configured Exchange server inside of 30 seconds. 30 seconds, no exaggeration. I've seen just email configuration alone consume three and four hours when working with BlackBerries, often due to the complexities of having to convince cell providers to reset BlackBerry user accounts on proprietary, closed systems.

#2. Tight, customizable security

Thanks to the News of the World voice-mail hacking scandal, smartphone security scrutiny is at an all-time high. Thankfully, iPhones are more secure than many give them credit for.

Leveraging good business practices (enforce encrypted backups, restrict store access, require passcode use, enable 256-bit AES encryption for all handset data and power Cisco- or SSL-powered VPN connections, etc.) helps lock down the devices. iPhones also support remote data wiping, including directly by users within Outlook Web Access when running newer Exchange platforms.

Business applications benefit, too, from heightened security. Because iOS apps run within protected memory spaces, a runaway or malicious program can't access another application's data.

#3. Best application support

Whenever a client needs a third-party app (such as a project management tool, task management utility, e-reader, mapping program, notes synchronization app or similar app), there's almost always an iPhone-specific program available. Apple's smartphone easily leads the pack.

In fact, it's not even a race. In July Apple announced more than 15 billion apps had been downloaded by more than 200 million iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users. Certainly, iPhone users have many choices. More than 425,000 apps are available.

Best of all, Apple makes it easy for iPhone users to browse, search, download and update applications. It all comes back to ease of operation. Apple's become one of the most highly capitalized corporations ever, in part, due to the simplicity and reliability the iPhone provides.

Your take

Techies feel very strongly about their smartphones. You may well agree with the iPhone assessment, or you may strongly disagree. Post your comments below. But be sure to provide real-world examples, too. Don't just say iPhones are weak; state why they're weak (maybe your iPhone 4 drops voice calls in a tunnel where your old Motorola handset never failed). Or maybe you think the iPhone rocks, in which case actual examples will better assist other business users in understanding how it helps you (maybe you're able to run unique applications tailored to your vertical market, for example). Weigh in below.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

50 comments
NicoJuicy
NicoJuicy

For every local computer store, retail store Apple's products are worse for business. Just because Apple doesn't allow them to get a decent % revenue on the products, they all want it for themselves :s

birumut
birumut

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danekan
danekan

In addition I think the Blackberry price point for long term life cycle is much more attractive than the Iphone's... For Blackberry devices, we're getting them practically free (we pay $10 or something for a 3G Curve w/ no contract--actually there was a time a few years ago when they PAID us to get newer model blackberries). Iphones we don't have a contract per say but they have a 2 year policy that you can't order the same person an iphone within that 2 year policy.. Now, let's examine what happens in real life... It's not necessarily the up front price that matters, but the life cycle of how business users consume the phone. What happens in a year? I'm the type of user who considers the Blackberry to be built like a toy. It's cheap and I don't necessarily care that it only lasts a year at best, because if it breaks it's $10. I recently switched to an Iphone, which finally is at a price point of $50 which puts it in the realm of possibility to get for business users without having substantial justification over a BB. The problem though is what happens a year from now when the iphone accidentally breaks? (...it already did actually. a small amount of condensation from a cold glass sitting next to my device caused the 3gs to completely freak out and is now dead). Or what happens when a user leaves it in a cab (happens several times a year)? Because of the 2 year period on the Iphone I'm somewhat screwed, ehh? My option, I believe, is to now pay $500ish full price for a new device. Most businesses will not be too happy about that. With a Blackberry at $10 and no contract, I order a replacement and it's no big deal. (I doubt there are any companies out there getting a better break from AT&T on the iphone than that too. So while my #s may not apply to everyone, I can at least reasonably assume that it's probably not a cheaper device for others either)

Nikhil K
Nikhil K

I used my BB Curve for long with satisfaction. I did nothing techie about it. I wished I could some day find time to download evernotes but was never able to. Now I want a phone I can use to see the documents on my Macbook Pro. I will probably be doing some reading, emails, pictures, and...if I find the time...a game or two. Angry Birds is out, though, I see nothing amusing in it. For the purpose of syncing it with my MBP, I think I need the iPhone. Can someone help me with my decision please?

mtfesenmaier
mtfesenmaier

Looking for help, can anyone let me know how the top 3 (IPhone, BB and Droid) stack up as for possible security threats at a business level. I am hearing that the most secure at this time (after a few fixes) is the BB. We know they can all be hacked, but who's are the most secure and why? Got any studies on the subject?

johnpall
johnpall

@abeggerman (i know it's wrong but sounds better) @swilson191 has much better points than you have made!

dev_dsk
dev_dsk

200 million iphones, 15 billion apps downloaded. This works out to an average of 75 apps per iphone. Given that there were far fewer apps and far fewer downloads for the first 100 million iphones, there would have to be an average of over 100 apps per current iphone for the quoted numbers to be accurate. How many people have 100 apps on their iphone? There would appear to be a discrepancy in the numbers, unless a very larger percentage of iphone app downloads are throw-away, ie. sifting through the junk of 425,000 apps to find a few good ones.

abegeman
abegeman

Recently I was asked to review changing over our company blackberries to i-phones. These are my findings (would welcome any comments!) From my point of view I dont see any business benefit in changing to the i-phone, as the blackberry does everything we need with regards to e-mail, calendar, address book and task synchronisation and does it fairly well. Changing to the i-phone might even mean compromising some of these abilities; Im not really sure what we would gain from swapping over? Granted the web browsing is far better on the i-phone and it has a larger choice of apps, but are these Apps really going to be of any benefit to our business? On the server / admin side of things, our existing blackberry server allows functions such as remote wipe and lock of hand-helds in the instance they get lost or stolen, Wireless activation of handsets, and also compression of e-mails; making the blackberry far more economical to run. All this would be lost using the i-phone. Unless we spend literally thousands of pounds upgrading to the latest version of exchange server Equally as the i-phone is essentially aimed at the home market, every user will be tied in to running i-tunes on there desktop (even to the point where the phone wont turn on out of the box with out authenticating with an i-tunes account) This in turn brings all sorts of admin issues and problems. Essentially each account will need to be administrated by the user . Then there is the expensive of putting new infrastructure in and purchasing new handsets for everyone. Currently our system does not support outlook web access, so we would require a new server and ISA software in order to enable this securely. At 630 a handset it would cost around 5040 to migrate our existing blackberry users and 1134 for the software to run on our servers. On Balance I personally dont think its worth while. Costs associated with Roaming and charges (from a telecoms rep) a business tool. In short, Blackberry encrypts their messages making sabotaging private or corporate data near impossible. Messages (email) are also compressed to about a tenth of the original size, what this really means is that when roaming you do not incur massive roaming charges. One of my customers recently went to Geneva and had not removed data roaming on their iPhone. They forgot to remove the APN which meant that the handset continued to poll for information (e-mail only). They received some alert texts from us notifying them that they had accesses data, but as the texts arrived during the night with the phone on silent they managed to incur over 3,000 of data roaming charges overnight! I cannot emphasise enough how costly it is to roam with iPhone and if you do not have a requirement for a specific business app that is critical then stick with blackberry. Aside from the above you will have to change out your infrastructure and even when you do you will not have the same functionality.

swilson191
swilson191

Having worked in the Enterprise and SMB realm as end user support and manager for the last 15 years, I've come to realize that is less about managing a mobile OS but rather what works for the end user. As CharlesDR said, it's simple. And just because it's "simple", doesn't mean it can't be secure. Starting with Windows Mobile 4.x and its Active Sync to RIM's BB's and its desktop sync, now to Iphone, my total yearly issues (75 mobile users) with Iphone are less than 10 tracked hours total. With Windows Mobile, those hours numbered in the hundreds yearly, the same with BB's after we migrated from WM. I to was skeptical about swapping from BB to Iphone, after having gone through what turned out to be a nightmare in migrating from WM to BB, I was extremely skittish. It's has turned out to be the best decision I've made in regards to our mobile workforce. The end user feels empowered and in fact, they help each other out. In the past, It was strictly IT doing the updates, repairs, "where and how do I do this or that", that is nearly gone. I can give a new user, who has never used an Iphone in the past and by the end of the day, that user has a solid grasp of the OS and where to find things. That has never ever occurred with WM or BB. The end user training was calculated in the hours per week. Additional benefit is the reduce employee cost, no more BB/Mobile admin. Reduced infrastructure cost in not having to maintain a BBE server/license/apps.

randall.cohen
randall.cohen

I question when Apple will provide an Enterprise the ability to acquire site licenses for applications they want/need on every iDevice. Also when will they provide the tools or APIs that will allow an Enterprise to "push" required applications to iDevices without the user initiating the "pull" or requiring them to connect to iTunes or the AppStore. More importantly, IT needs to be able to "push" iOS updates to the devices to keep them up-to-date and secure. Please correct me if these tools already exist and provide where they can be acquired.

CharlesDR
CharlesDR

It is never ending discussion. For me it is simple. After being in IT business about 20 years and working with many devices, now I am just tired to play with phone. I just want to use it with ease and paintlesly. I don't really care about all the settings and possibilities of other phones. Simplicity, reliability. There are comments about weakness of the iPhone "one can not take of the battery to reset the device as BlackBerry can" - well I never needed it with iPhone. Or other "I do not need 400000 apps" no one needs 400000 apps, but one will find his 20 needed Apps among them. All in all - I am not emotional about Apple and iPhone, but they go way I always wished for an IT industry - it is not way for us, geeks, IT managers, admins and so, it is way of humans. Have a knife to cut the bread, car to drive from point A to B, smart phone to handle tasks you need without having study manual and playing with it for hours before it can actually work... Take care all of you ;-)

Justin James
Justin James

Sure, the three things listed above are important, but they are hardly the be-all-and-end-all for "business use". For an organization that needs to write its own internal apps, I'd argue that both Android and WP7 are better choices because they use languages/ecosystems (Java and .NET, respectively) that are already well-known in the enterprise space. For security, you simply cannot beat BlackBerry + BES, as much as a hassle and added expense that it is. For "business use" that requires a lot of text input, Android, BlackBerry, and WP7 all offer a variety of models that sport physical keyboards with a nice selection of layout, iPhone doesn't. If your business is not with Verizon or AT&T, is iPhone worth switching carries? Do iPhones sync nicely with your desktop documents and apps like WP7? Do iPhones have the wide selection of app stores like Android? Is it possible to develop apps for iPhone without buying a Mac or using a tool that Apple can shut down at any moment? Etc. etc. etc. Oh, and if your business users actually need to make PHONE CALLS... well, my experience has been that iPhones are not great for phone calls themselves. I'm not saying that iPhones stink. Clearly, there is a market for them and lots of people are getting use (including business use) out of them. But to flat out declare them "better" on the basis of these three meager criteria is just plain wrong. Each business has different needs, and makes the selection based on what their needs are. Of course, if Erik hadn't couched the thing in a giant blanket statement, I am sure that there would be a lot less for anyone to disagree with. J.Ja

tsidio
tsidio

Enterprises love their Blackberries for many good reasons. However, there are more small and medium sized businesses (aka SMBs) than there are enterprise businesses. If you are in IT in an enterprise, you probably manage Blackberries (for now).I personally do not believe that RIM is going to survive in it's current form and possibly not at all. If you own an SMB, or are a consultant to SMBs, you, like Mr Eckel, will benefit from recommending and using iPhones for many reasons. Perhaps the most important reason is they just work. If you are an SMB employee and/or a geek and you want to buy your personal android phone and tweak it to your heart's content, go for it! As the owner of an IT Consultancy, as well as President & CEO of another company, today, I recommend iPhones for my SMB clients. Why? Because they just work. I run my businesses on my iPhone. Android is a very interesting platform that, in my opinion, is currently most appropriately utilized by geeks. Sent from my iPhone

Gisabun
Gisabun

Can you do remore wiping from an Exchange server to an iPhone? Phone security on the iPhone is useless if the IT staff at the company can't enforce their security policy. The user can otherwise change it anytime they wish.

keithm2576
keithm2576

HI Eric, I am an unusual Techo, I still don't own a Smartphone! I run my own IT Consultancy and so far have had no need for email, etc on the road, though this will change soon. I still use my Nokia 6250i! However, I have had cause to support clients with various smartphones. I had my first run-ins with Blackberries years ago and still will not touch them. One client fought with them for about 2 years before they got it right. Although I like the Android, particularly the HTC models with it, I will probably buy an iPhone. Why? Well because from where I am sitting I have to choose between the iPhone and the rest and the rest is a minefield! Android, Windows, Blackberry, Symbion! Which OS? And don't get me started on the makes & models! Or I could buy an iPhone; simple! But most importantly, I have helped a number of clients with iPhones. Setting up email really is as easy as you say. Any problems I have encountered have been ISP/hosting problem! So although I have nothing against "the rest" for an easy life, iPhone it is! Keith PS HAs anyone come across a client with a Windows phone?

brockers
brockers

Android is simply not going to be usable in business until they have: 1) microSD support 2) Multiple hardware vendor support 3) Multiple service provider support 4) Options for business specific install configurations 5) Tethering options 6) Private App Store support 7) True multi-tasking 8) Flash support 9) Unlimited data plans 10) ...and a model that doesn't cost me $200 per employee, just for the phone! All that said, at least the Android DOES have a removable battery!

nustada
nustada

Easy almost always equals inflexible.

kennon
kennon

Until Apple uncouples it's devices from iTunes it is a non-starter in our environment. I hear something like that will be the case in iOS 5 so we shall see but they might be too late considering most of our users are in love with their Blackberries and Android phones. I rarely am even asked anymore when iPhones will be supported. Our management and sales team love their Blackberries, and the techies love the Android. Leave the iPhones to the kids.

jscott418-22447200638980614791982928182376
jscott418-22447200638980614791982928182376

Although I am a Apple Mac users. My vote is for Android. If I ran a business I would hate to have to be stuck with what Apple decides I need. Android seems more open with choices. Those that use the iPhone in a large corporate business find the iPhone handicaped with some of their programs which won't run on a iPhone. Flash is used a lot on their web sites which of course the iPhone can't do.

LedLincoln
LedLincoln

Exchange email sync is at least as easy on Android. As far as number of apps, choice =/= quality. A point you don't mention: Maps and navigation on the iPhone is crippled compared to Android.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

Erik, I'll give you credit, you said better, but you didn't say better than what. As a business user having had both the iPhone and an Andriod, I find very little if any difference in email configuration or applicaiton security settings. If I dicsount some of the settings Andriod lets me control vs Apple just includes those without telling users. App support, or app control? I can purchase apps from Google, Amazon, and Samsung, but if you want Steve to control your information by all means, you go with apple. I'm betting you really want to generate a bunch of apple vs andriod comments with this article, and for that, my hat's off to you.

danekan
danekan

#1) It takes your techs 4 hours to add a blackberry on your BES? That's really surprising, and I would think highly unusual. It takes me on average 30 seconds to do the server side updates required to activate a new BB, and another 30 seconds to type the BES activation in. The same steps are required on an iphone, though (we don't enable ActiveSync by default for Exchange users, we have to enable that on the account for iphones to work--for security reasons). Also, there are management tools that can make it easier for your organization if you're really having that much issue managing your BB's (Boxtone is one we use, but the quick timing of setting up a BB is completely unrelated to that, it still wouldn't take more than a minute to add a new blackberry without this). If you're having to "convince" a provider to reset a "Blackberry" account, are you referring to BIS accounts? BES exists for a reason.... so you can centrally manage your own accounts. It sounds like you're not even using a corporate configuration based off of your complaints. The most time consuming part of adding a new blackberry for me is calling provider to activate the device if they're an existing user and I'm not reusing the SIM card, which takes usually 10-15 minutes. We still have to do this w/ ATT for an iphone though. Actually, with an Iphone it's pretty much required that we do this, whereas a Blackberry it is not. #2) Are you kidding me? Blackberry has more security options in a corporate environment than an iDevice does. Period. You could remotely wipe a Blackberry long before you could an Iphone. In fact that was a major sticking point in slow corporate adoption. There are WAY more options available for securing a Blackberry device than an Iphone. You can control down to the application level remotely on BES. I don't see a single point in #2 that a BES Blackberry doesn't do, actually. (with the exception of the actual end user being able to remotely initiate a wipe. The help desk can do this out of the box, but not end users.. though this could be done though on a BES just not out of the box by a simple portal) I would say an iphone's network connection is inherently less secure than a Blackberry on BES, because you can't control the data flow... you can't control anything at the app level, either, on an Iphone. A BES device goes through the corporate data network. BES allows application level controls on what level of access these can have as well, allows them to be blocked outright, etc. Iphone's idea of corporate managed security is setting a PIN, and allowing a remote wipe, and that's about it. Saying Iphone's security is customizable is a laugh riot... can you even prevent the end user from downloading certain applications? It's completely out of an admin's control, as far as I know? (are there third party ways to do this?). On a Blackberry, the JVM controls and prevents applications from accessing memory outside of their assigned space. Linking to an Apple page on security doesn't prove it's more or less secure... Where is the same link for Blackberry, to compare? I know they're out there... Please read a white paper or two on Blackberry security, even one of the first white papers they had out in 2003 answers all of the above questions. If Iphone was that secure, or easy to configure, Good would probably not be as popular as it is. #3) application support... there's nobody out there disputing Iphone excels in the app world.. agreed.

rpollard
rpollard

I just read an article about why not to buy an Android phone and there were 10 points in it that made sense. I'll list them below but first, I like iTunes in that it gives a single point of reference for new apps and updates. It's extremely easy in contrast to Android platform. Case in point - I finally had to do a Google search to figure out how to get an update for Angry Birds on the Nook Color. As opposed to the iPhone lets you know when there are updates. All I do is say Update All and type in my password. Here's a link to the article: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/government/10-reasons-not-to-buy-an-android-and-why-im-waiting-for-the-iphone-5/10763?tag=nl.e539 I have configured a couple of Android phones and there is absolutely no way it is as easy as the iPhone is. Techies don't care how difficult it is but the majority of users are not techies.

serich7
serich7

I will never have an iPhone as long as Apple forces you to use iTunes. Droids Rule!

5haggi
5haggi

But I find the flexibility of Android devices makes them a better bet for business. And the three 'plus points' quoted above for the iPhone apply equally well for Android. Blackberry .... are they still going?

rhonin
rhonin

For VPN, we have one way beyond 256. At this time RIM is the only one who effectively handle that level. Hoping with Win8 there will be additional options. Till then users are limited o an outside (non VPN) exchange server connection.

TNT
TNT

Droid can too. At my business we support iPhone, Android and Blackberry (we have our own Enterprise Server) and service over 4000 employees. Honestly, Android and iPhone are on an even par when it comes to security, ease of configuration and productivity apps. My reason for choosing an Android over an iPhone is there are times its nice to remove the battery to reset the phone (a regular occurance on Blackberries) and the variety of handsets to choose from. I use an Atrix 4G which has a front facing camera and HDMI out. Not bashing on iPhone, its a seriously good device, I just wish Apple offered a greater variety of handsets.

danekan
danekan

what's your opinion of blackberry devices that will have Android ?? I think it's very promising

danekan
danekan

it wasn't until you could remotely wipe an iphone that most corporations even allowed the iphone on their network... your IT department can do it remotely with Exchange, and if you have Exchange 2007 or newer, end users can do it in the OWA portal. (you can do the same on a blackberry, android, etc as well)

lplympton
lplympton

1. My HTC EVO 4G Shift has one 2. HTC, Samsung, Motorola, ect... 3. Sprint, Verizon, AT&T, ect... 4. True, but this applies to most other phone OSes. 5. Yep, can do that with my Evo, and most other Android phones 6. I can side load apps...I can think of a few phone OSes that can't. 7. Yep, got multi-tasking...better than anything except WebOS (May the god of phones rest it's soul.) 8. Yep, flash support. 9. Hmm, I'm on Sprint and have an umlimited data plan. (That's a carrier issue, NOT an OS issue.) 10. My Evo shift cost $99.00 as an upgrade on my existing plan. I have to say your list, while pretty, isn't really all that applicable.

Justin James
Justin James

... even the much-maligned WP7 supports most of this list: 1. Check... but limited (not hot swappable, must use a certified card, insert once and don't remove). 2. Check. 3. Check. 4. Check. 5. I *think* so, but don't quote me. 6. Check, as of a few weeks ago. 7. Semi-check, with the Mango update that just RTMed. I like it better than Android's which has a habit of letting junk sit in the background killing the battery and slowing it down. 8. Nope. 9. Check (with Sprint, T-Mobile). 10. Check. J.Ja

rhonin
rhonin

+1 just for the "commented list" :-)

johnpall
johnpall

Maybe as standard but there are plenty of great apps for this i have MetroView on a 3gs fantastic app works very well!

Gisabun
Gisabun

I agree with you 105%. I don't give a crap how many applications are available if many of them are (A) not even business related [I heard only 2% are] and (B) some written by amateurs.

rpollard
rpollard

What if you're a home user that can't contract with an IT company to manage you're security?

rpollard
rpollard

Everything you describe here is all fine and dandy if you're a corporate user. What good does that when average Joe wants security on a BB and don't know how to do all that mess you described above. The question is which is more secure for the average Joe that doesn't have an IT department taking care of security?

paleshire
paleshire

Wish I could recommend this more than once. iPhone (as it's name implies) is the king of being unsecurable. SSL, AES, VPN, etc is gratis quo for business devices. This shouldn't even really be a point of discussion. I believe it's more important to be able to control the applications and ways that the device is used. This is something that the iPhone doesn't offer. I also believe that it's important to have some level of faith in the company that you're allowing to touch your sensitive business information. RIM for the most part has shown that they aren't inclined to say "Hey those are our emails" or "We'll protect those for you, just let us upload them to our servers independent of your approval." Apple, not so much. Apple has shown (to me at least) that they want to control data not just provide a product. Just my .02

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It takes me longer to get a remote connection established to our BES than to add the user entry. It takes longer to charge the battery on new BB than to set up the enterprise activation. Combined, those two operations take maybe five minutes if I only use one hand. The longest part is synch'ing the data, and that's purely dependent on how much the user has in his Exchange inbox. I do see the 'remove battery' issue that TNT mentioned above way too often, but that's a completely separate complaint unrelated to BES connectivity.

rhonin
rhonin

Own an iPad2, Transformer, i4 and Nexus One. They all provide me OTA notices for updates for everything except: - Android I get an OTA notice for system updates and can update OTA - iOS I have to connect to iTunes for system notices and updates Then there is the size limitation for iOS on 3G. oops. Not sure why you are having difficulty. Well, except for the Nook. That I am not real familiar with.

keithc
keithc

iOS 5 is removing the dependance on iTunes, and it will be released within the next two months, along with the new iPhone.

Justin James
Justin James

It's hard to tell sometimes without vocal inflection, but he was sarcastically making a point. iPhone can't do ANY of those, except carrier choice (kind of, if you call 2 carriers "choice"). J.Ja

danekan
danekan

the article is specifically for "business users" AND bes express is a free product so there's no reason a small business even can't enjoy it's benefits as well. if you're going to make this argument against blackberry, an iphone without a corporate policy is still less secure than a blackberry out of the box

Laurentian Enterprises
Laurentian Enterprises

The basis of this whole article was "I-Phone for Business?". So an IT department is part of that scene.

Justin James
Justin James

I would agree with this, except the poster is responding to Erik's original article, which is specifically about "enterprise" use... people with an IT department. I wouldn't call a company that isn't installing BES to support their BlackBerries an "enterprise". J.Ja

rpollard
rpollard

Which also makes another good point. Android on the Nook Color works differently than Android on a phone. This is at least true in the case of both these devices. I would venture to say that the interface experience is not the same experience on any of the 300 devices with Android on it. I like a single, simple and consistent interface. It's nice that you can get a different phone if you want but not nice to have to re-learn the interface.

Stalemate
Stalemate

At my place of work, cloud sharing services are off limits.

rhonin
rhonin

You want to bet you can do away with iTunes? I have not seen anything from Apple that claims that once iCloud goes live with OTA functionality, users can get rid of iTunes. Bet you will still need it.

xeno.zentag
xeno.zentag

Seeing as the iOS only runs on 3 devices you can't say iOS does a better job. If you sponsor Apple as a monolithic world power, it will dictate what you `can`do with their hardware. As it is, not only is iOS adopting major OS changes from Android, Android is growing faster because of all the different companies contributing to it`s development. Since it`s an open source OS, there is no competition when it comes to innovation. Google has announced that it`s clamping down on certain changes to the OS, allowing a more unified interface, but overall Android is the more versatile platform.

xeno.zentag
xeno.zentag

I know from experience that there are some things you can only purchase using iTunes. If you read the blurb carefully you will notice that there it specifically states that it can be 'activated, set up' and 'download updates' without a PC. Other media is not mentioned! ALSO In the keynote speech, it was shown that i-Devices will be able to wirelessly sync to iTunes, driving the point home that most people will still rely on iTunes for synchronization. Why would this be necessary if the iCloud takes care of all sync functions?

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