Microsoft

Three signs you’re drinking the Microsoft Kool-Aid

Have you been drinking the Microsoft Kool-Aid? Here are three sure signs you need to step back, take a deep breath, and re-examine marketplace realities.

kool-aid_microsoft.jpg

Mac users have long been criticized for drinking the proverbial Apple Kool-Aid, but as iOS and OS X market share continues climbing, and Microsoft continues hemorrhaging, now might be the time to ask whether you’re drinking the Microsoft Kool-Aid. Here are three sure signs you need to step back, take a deep breath, and re-examine marketplace realities.

1. You think Windows 8 / 8.1 is a successful operating system

By most measures, Microsoft’s Windows 8 platform is failing. From the start, the new OS was so plagued with issues that Microsoft developers worked feverishly to rush the release of a well-publicized 8.1 update. The free update aims to correct several infamous issues with the Windows 8 release, including adding a Start button, having the ability to boot to the desktop, and improving multitasking by enabling more app display customization.

Windows 8 proved to be so severe a debacle, though, that it’s actually credited with depressing PC sales worldwide. According to IDC analyst Bob O’Donnell, “The Windows 8 launch not only failed to provide a positive boost to the PC market, but appears to have slowed the market.”

Unfortunately, Microsoft couldn’t even get the update, designed to correct the OS’ original shortcomings, right. Redmond pulled the Windows RT 8.1 update from its Windows Store in October, shortly after the update was released. Other Windows 8.1 issues are being reported, as well.

Apple, meanwhile, continues to enjoy significant sales for both its iOS and OS X platforms. The first weekend sales for its new iPhones set a record, with some 9 million units selling in just days. And in the past quarter, some 3.8 million Macs sold, only a minor dip from the comparable previous year’s quarter when the new Mountain Lion release helped fuel sales.

2. You believe Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer’s reign was successful

Few industry flameouts have proven as spectacular as the fall that occurred under Steve Ballmer’s watch. Never mind the fact that he killed the company’s Courier tablet project shortly before Apple revolutionized the concept with its iPad. Never mind he presided over not just the Windows 8 fiasco but also the Windows Vista debacle. Forget that the Surface launch proved so troublesome that his company was forced to write off $900 million in inventory or that the Zune music player never climbed beyond single-digit market share.

The fact that Microsoft lost 60 percent of its market share under his watch should be all the proof you need. The CEO, ultimately, lost the battle to keep the software behemoth relevant. Investors will point out Microsoft’s stock value fell more than 30 percent, too. Add in the failed $6.3 billion aQuantive Inc. acquisition and you should possess all the evidence required to understand that the Redmond entity is failing.

During the same time period, Apple’s OS X market share grew new legs, the firm singlehandedly rejuvenated the tablet market, and iPod, iPhone, and iPad sales histories became legendary case studies taught at almost every business school. Not only did the iPod and iPhone change the way people use music devices and smartphones, Apple also changed the way people purchase, access, and consume media, communications, and content. Oh, and Apple became the single most valuable company and the world’s number one brand, while remaining an organization celebrated worldwide for customer satisfaction. Even following Apple’s 2013 stock slide, the firm’s market capitalization ($462 billion) still towers over Microsoft’s ($292 billion).

3. You think Microsoft still owns majority market share

Perhaps the most concerning fact for Microsoft supporters is the firm’s stunning market share slide. The corporation’s operating system share fell from a titanic high of 96% in 2000 to just 35% last year. Gartner recently predicted that Apple iOS/OS X share will soon surpass that of Windows.

When I first began touting Apple technologies as viable Windows alternatives in 2005, everyone was quick to call me crazy. However, the numbers suggest I wasn’t. Windows has fallen to just 3% of the phone market. Apple, meanwhile, is selling hundreds of millions of iOS devices. Mac OS X continues fueling Mac sales. New iPhone and iPad launches remain significant events, over which even the non-technical media salivate.

One of the most important facts is that Apple has changed the way people purchase, download, update, and maintain software, which is helping fuel continued growth. Earlier this year, the Cupertino company announced customers have downloaded more than 50 billion apps from its App Store. And while Apple has paid billions of dollars to iOS developers, PC sales continue to slide.

Did I miss anything here? Share your thoughts in the discussion thread below.

 

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

54 comments
uajesusfreak99
uajesusfreak99

Yeah, let's compare Apple MacBook to any one of 20 Windows-based laptops. Apple costs twice as much (the CHEAP options for Apple devices are $1000) for the same hardware and performance, and you don't get any more software than you get bundled with a Windows PC. If I want to spend $1000 on a Windows laptop, I can get an Ultrabook that has touchscreen capabilties AND much better hardware than Apple's proprietary crap.

mcmurphy510
mcmurphy510

Mary Weilage

As the editor of TR, are you even reading this crap?  Again, I'm not going to respond to any of Mr. Eckels so called points.  95% + of the respondents here take care of that quite well.  He's an ignorant man with an agenda; whether that agenda is to push Apple, or just use this site as his own trolling platform, I don't know.  And it's not relevant.

TR calls itself a "...community for technology decision makers."  As a technology decision maker (and a leader of decision makers) I expect TR to have relevant, useful and objective information to ... um... help me make decisions.  An article like this is simply a waste of my time, and doubtless a waste of time for countless others in my organization.  Not only is it time wasted reading it, but also talking about it, and ultimately responding to (I plead guilty to that here).  

But, Ms Weilage, you already know that.  Any competent professional who takes pride in their work, when they see inaccuracies, incorrect conclusions or outright lies related to their line of work, many of them have no choice but to correct them.  I understand, it's good for readership.  But you've allowed Mr. Eckles to cross the line (yet again).

On behalf of 95% + of your readership, I demand an apology from either you or Mr. Eckles and a removal of him as a contributor to your publication.  If you don't I'm just going to start regarding TR as nothing more than the National Enquirer of Tech and unsubscribe to all newsletters, as well as add TR to our corporate firewall.

jsargent
jsargent

"Gartner recently predicted that Apple iOS/OS X share will soon surpass that of Windows." If we are talking only about PC's OSes then Windows still has 90% of the install-base but if you want to talk about smart devices and phones then Android bases OSes are way out in front from everyone else. The author for sure has been drinking Apple flavoured Kool Aid. Personally speaking I think that Steve Balmer was a failure but he no worse than many other people in similar positions.  Also XP only sold 250,000 copies in the first month but Windows8 has reported 40,000,000 copies  (source zdnet) but look at XP now...nobody wants to change from it and it has the largest install base. If you want to compare things then before Steve Jobs got back in the seat Apple was a complete failure and Microsoft was the darling. So M$ isn't as successful as it has been in the past but they are far from a complete failure. 

Francois E Bezuidenhout
Francois E Bezuidenhout

Have you looked at Microsoft's last quarter results? A floundering company? I think not. Like judging Ford for it's car sales compared to the Japanese products and ignoring Ford's truck sales. Is IBM a failure and heading for oblivion because it does not play in the Apple space? Get real.

wjameskirk
wjameskirk

Really one of the worst articles I have read in quite a while because no matter whether you are a acolyte of Redmond or Cupertino, this is a silly and biased article.

Putting it in a more accurate context, Microsoft is becoming les relevant every day not because IOS/OSX/Linux is better but because like them or not Tablets have introduced a whole new paradigm and a new class of hardware. This phone/phablet/tablet grouping has brilliantly targeted the consumer market and taken the three of four uses that true consumers had for PC's (mail, web, games, music) and put them into a more friendly device. Combine this with a new pricing model for software and the average consumer who would have used a PC for these things before suddenly had no reason to need a PC. The brilliant, portable hardware then offered apps that did things that a pc or laptop could not do (can you hold even a laptop up to the sky and see an accurate plot of the stars in the heavens?).

The immediate impact in the fall of PC sales was really in the customer base that never really needed the full capabilities of a PC. That was unavoidable, but surprisingly, there has been less impact than you might think. These new devices became an additional computing device more than a replacement. Except for consumers, few people have given up their PC for work, most often they have supplemented it with their tablet of choice. I myself have bought 3 iPhones and 5 iPads and I try not to think that they spend 90% of their time doing games, web browsing and facebook. My iPad mini is invaluable at meetings and checking mail out of the office ... and games. When I am back at my desk it will be my MacBook, or my Windows 8.1 tablet that I turn to.

The change in the face of the industry (and the respective % values) represents this new reality that this new class of device makes available. The rest of this article is anti Redmond Drivel. Windows 8.1 is not a failure. It was always going to have a slow start with an installed base that likes unchanging stability (ie many of whom still run XP). If Windows 7 could not move these users from XP, then Windows 8.1 stood no chance. No its new UI which so frustrates the portion of the user base that wanted no change enables business class machines to start to have the kind of applications that can only be written once touch screens, GPS and accelerometers are available. I don't just mean the tablet apps, but real business class applications.

to include mobile OS and desktop OS in numbers is a disingenuous attempt to make one look good over the other. For the moment we have two separate classes of machine and are moving to a market where desktop class computers will tend to move back to the business community where they began before the proliferation of PC's to every home began. The consumer devices will continue to evolve and in some cases to converge. The success of the convergence rests on the likes of Windows 8.1 and new touch enabled versions of Linux that are coming on stream.

The only advice I can give as a lifelong IT guy and IT Director is that if someone is telling you that their hardware/software platform is GREAT and the other guys are fanboy CRAP, they are giving you half the picture, and in doing so are trying to hide from you the other half. Open your eyes, listen to the arguments of both sides, especially why they are GREAT. Ignore the junk about the other guys being CRAP (its just a lot of tribal rubbish akin to football hooligans) and see the strengths of both. Make up your own mind! 

Years ago I was in a PC World when Apple came out with those beautiful screens on the pedestal stand and the clear plastic speakers. I listened to a salesman talking to a family getting ready to buy their first computer for their home. I listened to him heap praise on the Apple for the best technology in the industry, the best screen, a beautiful keyboard and speakers.... all far ahead of the PC world. All of this was of course true, but when I saw the father start to count out his money to buy the Apple, I stopped him and said "Before you do that, take one factor into account. Everything the salesman told you was true, but look at the left side of the store." He looked and I said "do you see the 10 rows of shelves full of software on one side, that is where PC owners chose their software fro, do you see the last row, one half of that row is where the Apple owners choose their software from. Now when you are buying software for your kids, where do you want to shop?... he bought a PC.

My point then, and now was don't get to enamored of the brand name. It is just a device which you acquire to provide you capabilities. The device that gives you the most  capability is by definition the best. Belonging to one gang and saying they are the best and the other guys SUCK is the sign of a tiny mind incapable of independent thought. . 

David@Morris.net
David@Morris.net

Why is it you wanna bee journalists spend so much time perfecting you spin, rather than stating facts.Further, what is the value of this entire article, except to let you evangelize Apple….

So, in reviewing your comments on Kool-Aid… Let’s see, Apple has been preaching the story for three decades and giving their product away the education community… yet they have not caught to the Microsoft market share.So I think the subject line should change to “Three Signs You Still Suffer from Microsoft Envy”

  1. Microsoft had it’s worst OS fielding in the history of the Company but Windows 8 desktop, by itself, holds a larger market share than Mac OS X, and Windows 8.1 will soon pass them. The Windows 8 hardware and software solution was released during a worldwide recession and yet it quickly outpaced Apple.Source: www.netmarketshare.com

  2. Who cares how pretty or successful an individual is rated… this is another sign of envy… and it is stunning because Ballmer is nothing to look at and sounds like a football jock… Linebacker. Maybe you should do a little homework and understand the function of a CEO, the Board of Directors and Shareholders.

  3. Just another liberal journalist searching for something cling to.Note, Gartner has been a crutch for many business leaders who can’t make a decision on their own, and there “predictions” are as accurate as tarot cards. Windows currently holds a 90.6% share of the desktop worldwide. www.netmarketshare.com

In conclusion, the author also fails to see the big picture because he is blinded by his envy and his stated goal of finding a Windows alternative.The facts are, Windows OS is only part of a much larger offering. Microsoft has multiple business units, most of which, Apple cannot even figure out how to compete in.

  • Interactive Entertainment Business — Key entertainment experiences that span gaming, music and video across multiple screens, including Xbox 360, Xbox LIVE, the controller-free Kinect for Xbox 360, and Xbox Music and Video, as well as PC and mobile interactive entertainment.

  • Microsoft Business Solutions — A portfolio of Microsoft Dynamics products and services, as well as Microsoft Health Solutions.

  • Microsoft Office Division — Productivity, collaboration and enterprise social products and services, including Office, Yammer, Exchange, SharePoint, Project, Visio, Perceptive Pixel, and Microsoft’s speech technology investments.

  • Online Services Division — Microsoft’s search, portal, advertising and personal communications services, including online information offerings such as Bing and the MSN portals and channels.

  • Server and Tools Division — Microsoft infrastructure software, developer tools and cloud platform, including products such as Windows Server, SQL Server, Visual Studio, System Center and the Windows Azure Platform.

  • Skype — A division of Microsoft enabling communications from the living room to the board room, through its consumer and enterprise products Skype and Lync.

  • Windows & Windows Live Division — All Windows businesses, including Windows, Windows Live and Internet Explorer.

  • Windows Phone Division — Microsoft software and services for Windows Phones worldwide.

thoddi
thoddi

 " From the start, the new OS was so plagued with issues that Microsoft developers worked feverishly to rush the release of a well-publicized 8.1 update."

It was very foreseeable from the start that Windows 8 would be a difficult launch. They where making a new consept for how a modern UI should look like. Microsoft said before they showed windows 8 to anyone that it was the riskiest OS they had ever made.
The issues people had with it was mainly that it was different than they were used to.

Also, they did not rush windows 8.1. They announced at the same time they announced windows 8 that they would be going for an anual release of windows (incromental updates) or at least semi-anual. So everyone that had been listening to them new with a year notice that they would realese an update the yaer after.

Beside all that, as thay said, this was allways going to be risky bet. It makes sense that windows 8 isn't flying out of the stores because windows 8 has always been a bet on how the future of computing is going to look like. So we'll see how the bet works out for them in meybe a few years. After all, I don't think Microsoft has ever released something new that became instant hit. But they have usually become a little better year by year.
Windows 8.x has never lost any market share, only gained a little by little. In my opinion, this is just how Microsoft makes new things. Release the product, improve it with time, be patient and wait for the marketshare to gain.

Tinman57
Tinman57

  I'm sick of Microsofts shenanigans and won't upgrade (if that's what you call it) again.  I should have my Linux based WorkStation in this week and am looking forward to it.

minstrelmike
minstrelmike

Disagree with #1

When windoze 8 first came out with the dual operating system, I read the reviews and assumed it was bad, bad, bad. And as far as using it on a PC is concerned, that is still true (although half of the OS is still useful and works for a PC).

What changed my mind about it was the Surface hardware. $450 machine WITH OFFICE. Most of the non-business people I deal with still want Office and aren't willing to use Google Docs (no matter how much I push for that). And ALL of the biz people want Office.

Windows 8 is actually perfect for the Surface where you can use it as a regular laptop for business and then deconstruct it into a tablet for play/mobile (using the touch screen os).

As a standalone os for sale, Windows 8 sux. But as the os for the Surface, I believe MS may have game-changer.

If not, I still hate it less and less the more I find out about it. And I don't drink anyone's kewl-aid.

Goldsmith81
Goldsmith81

1 sign that you have overdosed on Apple Kool-Aid.  

1. You write an article like this one!

AES2
AES2

The introduction of minivans and SUVs did not eliminate cars.  Different vehicles now serve their own markets.  Likewise, the introduction of tablets filled a huge demand for lightweight, hand-held devices that can render documents, web pages, and other content, with support for light duty typing such as email and casual work on documents.  For millions of people laptops and desktops were bulky, heavy overkill for personal applications well served by tablets.  On shop and warehouse floors and on retail sales floors tablets solve the problem of carrying and hoping not to drop awkwardly heavy laptops or running back and forth to fixed locations.

My $200 Nexus 7 has PDF and ebook readers, a web browser, a note taker, and a multimedia player, which are pretty much all I need on a mobile device.  I can't imagine paying 50% more to get the same functions on apps differentiated by no more than brand on an iPad Mini that can't display Flash.  My Nexus 7 fits into a pocket on most of my jackets, and is easy to carry if I'm not wearing a jacket.

For project development and documentation and remote monitoring and management of my clients' networks the computer on my desk with two large monitors and a real keyboard and mouse is much more productive than my laptop, which lets me do the same work while away from my desk, although at a much slower pace.  I don't even want to think about how long it would take to do some of that work on a tablet.

Even if Windows 8 had no tablet features, PC sales would have dropped substantially thanks to tablets and even phones finally being available to serve needs that are overkill for PCs.  For needs that are underkill for tablets, PCs have a good future.

Even though they weren't first in their until-then insignificant markets, the iPhone and iPad created huge demands and were kings of the hill for a while.  What were the most recent quarter's and most recent 12 months' Android and iOS sales for phones?  Tablets?

The server market is less visible and where I see Microsoft hurting itself the most.  By killing Windows Server Enterprise Edition (four virtual instances per physical server), killing Small Business Server (Windows Server plus Exchange Server with attractive pricing for small businesses), and drastic price increases for Windows Server 2012 R2, they are asking long time server customers to consider other options.  Linux is already prevalent in web and POP servers, database appliances, and other applications, and there is serious competition from open source and proprietary products that run on Linux.

In short, for desktop and laptop PCs, despite Windows 8, OS X doesn't seem to be doing much and Linux is not yet serious competition.  For tablets it's currently Android v. iOS, but Microsoft has a lot of money, a lot of smart people, and a lot of patience.  Dell's new Venue 8 Pro is a very impressive 8" Windows tablet starting $300, the same price class as an iPad Mini, and their Venue 11 is imminent.  Windows tablets might stay in third place, but they could hold a strong, profitable third place if Microsoft and OEMs do the right thing.  For servers and server applications they need to look out their rear view window and see good companies and products catching up.

As for Mr. Ballmer, his forté is operations and marketing.  They need to find a visionary replacement who gets strategy.

flotsam70
flotsam70

LOFL. This fodder shouldn't be dignified with any responses.

Fritts The Cat
Fritts The Cat

For Christmas last year my wife and I went shopping for a laptop for her.  One sales person at a nationally recognized box store told us he would not by any of the laptops they offered because of MS Windows 8 OS.  He said Windows 8 was designed for touch screens only.  (None of the laptops this seller offered at that time offered touch screen capabilities.)  We did end up buying, from another vendor a Windows 8 powered laptop.  She says she likes Windows 8.  Not to be critical of my wife but she is not the tech in the family.  Needless to say this is the only Windows 8 machine in the stable of computers and devices we own.  Everything else runs on Windows 7. 

Liv&DieN; LA
Liv&DieN; LA

While I will not slam Apple, they have made a huge difference in the market and we know that competition is good for everyone, this article is bereft of any journalistic integrity. I think Apple or Microsoft fans would rather see some solid reporting for a change, unbiased opinions, figures base on facts not oranges to apples chicanery, and, most of all have some respect for your readers intelligence.

If we want to drink anyone's Kool-Aid we would go to directly to the vendor's website and take that as the gospel truth... why in the world would any self respecting reader want to read something like this. You might as well have a bold heading stating   (THIS ADD PAID FOR BY APPLE).

rmixon
rmixon

Go back and start over after a little study. Or chose a subject you are conftorbal with.

rwbyshe
rwbyshe

I tend to agree with "Don" whose response is below.  It definitely appears that this article was sponsored by Apple.  I would suppose I should have known where you were going right from the "Kool-Aid" title and it's inference to the Jim Jones tragedy!

The article could be substantially more objective and talk to both sides of the coin instead of continually repeating how great Apple is.  Microsoft has done some great things also but the main point I do agree with you on is how much Ballmer has hurt Microsoft overall.  MS survived the Vista days and in my mind they will survive the Win 8 days also.

Where I think MS went wrong was in their attempt to develop an OS for tablets, etc. and then expect it would be an easy do to make it "user friendly" for laptops and desktops.

Probably the highest praise for Win 8 that I've heard from any of my clients is:  "I'm getting used to it!"  I know of no one who has it that truly likes it.

Keep the faith, I think MS is going through a period like the U.S.A. did in 2008.  A time of rough sledding but they'll recover much as the USA did.  It will take time for sure, and they need smart management to accomplish the recovery.

So in my mind, this was a terribly slanted article and the true situation could have been presented with information that showed the pro's and con's of all the OS manufacturers instead of trying to solely relate MS to us as a final drink of cyanide laced Kool-Aid !!!

Tesla's Spark
Tesla's Spark

>>Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments.<<

If Erik tried to "assist" my small business by converting it to Appletoys technology challenges, I would think twice...

I'd rather step back few days, learn and start making tablet/phone gadgets friendly with PC system/network and make them speak same W8 language. So far like Nokia 822 and HP TX2000 tablet sporting W8. 

lolfml
lolfml

Can't argue with the points about Microsoft: they've always had sloppy, buggy products dating back to Win3.1. Only difference is that now more people see this because of the explosion of security exploits. And the statement "when I want to do real work I reach for a MS product" is obviously the lunatic rantings of a fanboi lol.

Whether Apple is filling the void is debatable; more like a ix of Apple and Open Source.

don
don

As an IT professional I need to keep objective about technology. That is why I get angry when people intentionally use misleading statistics to support a viewpoint. A perfect example is the first point in this article. If Windows 8 is such a failure, why is it outselling OSX? The facts are that every Microsoft operating systems starts out slow and then builds up momentum.

The statistical slight of hand in this article is to include iOS and Apple mobile devices where they beat Microsoft. You cannot include iPhone sales when comparing PC sales. That is a different category. If you want to compare laptops, compare the MacBook Pro to Windows 8 laptops or the MacBook Air to Windows 8 Ultrabooks. If you did that, then Microsoft would look very successful. If you compare iOS devices to Windows Phone, then yes, Apple comes out ahead. Of course then you'd have to include Android devices, and then Apple loses big time.

If you want to compare mobile devices, then Apple is actually the failure. They have dropped from 65% market share to 45% market share in the tablet space and the iPhone now only has 18% market share in SmartPhones.

Like it or not, Microsoft software still runs the majority of all businesses. While the average user doesn't see all those Microsoft servers running it all those data centers, you use them every day for things like web sites and email.

In my work I get to see real trends, not ones made up by bloggers. There is no trend to move from Microsoft backoffice servers, Windows laptops, or Microsoft Office to anything Apple. I do see trends like moving from BlackBerry to Android and iOS for mobile devices. Android and iOS devices are being added into businesses, but not as the primary computing device. They are secondary devices.

maj37
maj37

Seems to me Erik has not just drunk the Apple Kool-Aid but taken a bath in it.

Gisabun
Gisabun

#3 is bull crap. You are comparing apples [err] and oranges. If you lump iOS and OS X together, you might as well combine Android, ChromeOS and whatever else Google has. IoS and OS X have nothing to do with each other. You compare the hardware platform. MS still has a commanding lead in the desktop/laptop/server market. Android still rules smartphones [and tablets]. Gartner is like any other 'research" company - they look at a brief period of stats and come out with dumb conclusions unless they were paid by someone.

rm.squires
rm.squires

Erik Eckel - you got the wrong date your suppose to release this on April 1st not November 1st.


pro tip: if this wasn't a april fool, then give more market dept to this, breakdowns more evidence or stick to the article title make the three points but don't mention the competitors etc.

adornoe
adornoe

Erick Eckel: Looks like you got your butt kicked, AGAIN!!!, by people who are better informed and smarter than you.

Next time, think first, and then get some real information, and post something realistic, and not some trashy pro-Apple fanatic pigswill. 


moyashi
moyashi

Europe and Asia are leading the path away from MS, what with significant pivoting toward Open Source. Significant stories in the past year about public sector adoption of Ubuntu and Open/Libre Office.

Those of you posting who have clearly invested your entire careers in MS, you might think about broadening your base a bit in order to keep thriving in a more diverse future.

Anthony McGivney
Anthony McGivney

For Christ sake, is tech republic hiring CNET writers or something? Stop drinking the apple koolaid and sipping on their endorsements. Companies would falter if they switched their entire IS to Mac. At least the pc is repairable. Macs are becoming expensive disposable pieces of technology that try to be hip, trendy and artsy.

adornoe
adornoe

"... as iOS and OS X market share continues climbing"....

Stopped reading right there, because, the one drinking the kool-aid, right off the bat, is the Apple fanatic blogger above.

OS X and iOS have been losing market-share, not gaining.  

This article must've been written with "tongue-in-cheek" by the author.  It's that, or the author is woefully misinformed. 

adaptpeer
adaptpeer

Thanks for the FUD - it was rather amusing. If I want to get anything done, I reach for a Microsoft product - not a fruity toy.

Shawn Quinn
Shawn Quinn

No other IT company has a free hyper-v bare metal that runs share point, exchange, sql fully integrate it with office and outlook, plus make it all run on your laptop and your phone. Microsoft is self contained. No other maker of doodads can say that.

Shawn Quinn
Shawn Quinn

Ive had android and iphone and blackberry over the last 6 years. I just bought a windows phone. Best phone yet.

AstroCreep
AstroCreep

Point 1: I feel this is laughable.  The comment "The free update aims to correct several infamous issues" regarding the way Windows 8 worked is pure opinion - you didn't like the new Start menu or the way it worked.  I wouldn't classify that as an "Issue" as much as a "Preference". 
As far as it being a "Successful" operating system or not should be based on sales and reception, both of which were poor.  So while I would say that 8 wasn't "Successful" based on those criteria, not on how it worked differently than you were used to. 

Point 2: I am NOT a fan of Steve Ballmer, but you need to remember he has been CEO since 2000 and he has kept the company profitable this whole time.  Yes, Vista and 8 were black eyes, but the biggest problem wasn't the ability to drive sales or to adjust market share, it was to innovate, and I feel that is the biggest problem his legacy faced over the last few years. 

Point 3: 35%?!  This includes tablets and cell phones.  Okay, break that number down a bit to server OS and desktop OS and we'll see how this is a really stupid number.  Speaking of cell phones I like how Symbian and Blackberry weren't in the graph on the page you posted.  I'm sure there would have been a nice little sliver for each of them given their popularity in the late 2000s. 

Sheesh...

Anyway, this reads really as more as an op-ed piece for someone who got pissed when he lost his Microsoft Partner competencies last year than a "Real" piece about cognitive and rational evaluation of a company's products. 
JohnThoner
JohnThoner

Wow, this is quite the bogus article... don't drink the TechRepublic Kool-Aid either...

jamesski
jamesski

 Although I think your points on Microsoft are spot on, allowing that Apple is the viable option in the last paragraph leaves out the whole open-source unix/linux world entirely.  Further, it implies that the market lost by Microsoft has been gained by Apple.  Clearly they've gained a lot in the tablet and smartphone markets, but as an enterprise desktop/network system....I don't think they've got the market share that the open source has.

Joshua Morden
Joshua Morden

You left out everything Microsoft has been doing in their enterprise business. True, they have struggled in the face of new competition in the consumer market, but they are still a leader in the business segment. Look at all the client machines and servers that are running Windows. And, with the new wave of virtualization, they're not switching to OSX. They're going the Microsoft thin client route or with something like Citrix which also features virtual Windows 7 desktops. Microsoft and Apple are like apples and oranges in many ways (no pun intended). You can't say Microsoft is a failure without analyzing their entire business offerings, which you didn't do in this article.

Jerry Davis
Jerry Davis

When people are tired of playing games and ready to get some work done, they will put down those Apple toys and grab a Surface Pro 2. Based on your logic, I'm assuming you think the Cavalier is better than the Corvette?

trevora
trevora

I guess those hacks on Netmarketshare got it all wrong for worldwide operating system use. Classing iOS or Android in with business operating systems is pathetic.

Marc Wason
Marc Wason

Not to mention Apple is still a joke in the Government and serious corporate sector. Office will continue to be.far more robust than the lackluster productivity suites apple puts out.

Marc Wason
Marc Wason

Quantity does not indicate quality. IOS might have millions of apps and a dirth of users in the market these days (i was one up until a week ago) but it's 89% trashware. I ditched my second iPhone for a Nokia 925 and couldn't be happier. It's an adult machine, compared to the leappad knockoff that is iOS 7. Sure it took a few days to adjust, but it's far more responsive. I have a tablet with Win8, which might be where 8 should reside (on touchscreen devices) and Win7 on my gaming/design laptop. I was a Mac guy back when it wasn't popular in rge Performa 400 days, but i long ago decided i could do more with the right Windows system. Mac is nothing special, it's just trendy. IOS7 was just as buggy as Win8... Or as ANY major OS change has ever been. Short memories in the iOS5 & 6 headaches, apple maps? I'm not nieve to MS's corporate issues, but then again Apple would have died on the vine in 97 if Gates hadn't floated Jobs a few million. Apple needed Jobs to succeed and it's starting to show, they're still coasting by on his vision and without him or someone equally creativein charge, their fad will eventually peter out in the next 2-4 years. Even the Woz isn't impressed with Apple anymore.

David@Morris.net
David@Morris.net

@wjameskirk Thank you for writing and far more accurate post than the original article.  I am personally a fan of Apple, Microsoft, desktops, tables, and phones.  I enjoy using all of them and see value in each.  In my opinion, Apple has done an amazing job of advancing the data consumption experience and this as truly advanced the consumer electronics market. Microsoft has continued to provide excellent cost effective solutions for business. Their stated goal of moving to a single code base linking business and home users is still a work in progress but, I cannot find any competitor with the breadth and depth of products and services as those that I listed earlier.  I also think there attempt to merge laptop/desktop with data consumption activities may be misread by many.  Lastly, Microsoft is finally starting to field products on competing platforms so that things like OneNote, SkyDrive, Office, etc. can be used on a wide variety of hardware.   

mcmurphy510
mcmurphy510

@Fritts The Cat This speaks nothing to the success or lack thereof for Windows 8.  It speaks more to the bad employee screening policies of the aforementioned box store.

lelerew
lelerew

@lolfml You must be too young to remember DOS odds and evens?

dclhacker
dclhacker

@don "That is why I get angry when people intentionally use misleading statistics to support a viewpoint. A perfect example is the first point in this article. If Windows 8 is such a failure, why is it outselling OSX?"

Yes, that's a perfect example of misleading statistics. The comparison made in the article is not about desktop OS vs. desktop OS, it's about all OS's of a vendor combined vs. all OS's of other vendors (not just Apple). And yes, the author also said that Apple is about to surpass all of Microsoft's installed base, but that is only 35% of the market. Do the math: 35% (MS) + <35% (Apple) << 100%. Obviously, the remainder goes to the "other" category, which you've inferred is somehow not included.

Microsoft may be relevant on the desktop, but that is becoming a smaller and smaller share of what's important. In the growing segments, Microsoft is less and less relevant.

Of course, marketshare is not everything. If you look at what really matters to companies, profitability, Apple rules yet again. And that's with a minority marketshare. Apple's never owned the lionshare of the smartphone market, and they're doing quite well in that arena, thank you very much.

And more and more data centers are dropping Microsoft and no longer paying the MS tax for database, collaboration, and other compute services. Servers are the last holdout of most dying vendors (e.g., Sun, Digital, SGI, and now Microsoft), so using that as proof of your point is actually counterproductive to your argument.

dclhacker
dclhacker

@Gisabun "... you might as well combine Android, ChromeOS and whatever else Google has"

Read the article again, and you'll see that he does. The MS 35% + less than that for Apple, does not make up 100% of the market.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'd enjoy seeing the details of those 'significant stories'. Even more, I'd enjoy seeing even insignificant stories about successful private sector adoption of open source, especially in manufacturing environments.

As to paragraph 1's reference to other problems being reported with W8.1, the linked content discusses a single, non-technical problem with installation media and license keys.

Gisabun
Gisabun

@moyashi : "Stories"? I'd like to see some links....
"Those of you posting" - So you think everyone here who made a negative comment is completely a Microsoft fanbois or fangurls?

Gisabun
Gisabun

@Shawn Quinn : You seem to have been drinking the Microsoft "Kool-Aid" [as the sort of blogger describes it].

grayknight
grayknight

@dclhacker Where do you get that more data centers are dropping Microsoft? Actually, Microsoft's Azure is doing very well and is highly competitive with the other cloud providers. So maybe the data center drops a portion of their servers entirely for some in the cloud.

Sure, Apple has a very high profit margin (by overcharging for their devices). Microsoft has a lower profit margin, but Microsoft has many billion dollar businesses, so they still make a serious amount of money and will not disappear anytime soon. 

dclhacker
dclhacker

@Gisabun @moyashi Give it a rest -- read what moyashi said again, with a little less desire to be inflammatory. He only said the move away from proprietary Microsoft products is afoot, and if you've not noticed that, and have built your career based on that lock-in, you might want to reconsider.