iPad

Why IT departments should support iPad users

Erik Eckel explains why he thinks IT departments should support iPad users and why it could even be a boon to IT staff.

Erik Eckel explains why he thinks IT departments should support iPad users and why it could even be a boon to IT staff.

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Many IT departments resisted supporting iPhones. Why bother, many felt, when we have a BES (or other solution) in place?

But that's not what users want, clearly. Apple sold 8.7 million iPhones in just the first quarter of 2010 alone. More important, sales show no sign of slowing, as units sold were up 100% over the same period the prior year. The economy might be struggling, but Apple's technology sales certainly aren't. And in many (most?) cases, corporations aren't even buying the handsets; the users themselves are picking up the expense. That's how badly users prefer the iPhone over competing products.

Look for the iPad to follow in the same footsteps. Apple sold more than 300,000 iPads the day they were released. Further, analysts predict Apple will sell some 7 million units within a year.

Enterprise IT departments, frequently trained to lock out foreign systems and devices in order to tighten security, simplify support and minimize troubleshooting, should consider embracing iPads and supporting iPad users.

When users purchase iPads, they demonstrate interest in learning new and innovative technologies. These users reveal they're willing to learn new ways of working. They show they are seeking new ways to improve communication, enhance productivity, bolster efficiency, and possible find new solutions to old problems.

Aren't those the kinds of efforts corporate IT and larger organizations should be encouraging? It's amazing how quickly so many enterprise IT staff reject new technologies outright, whether due to real or perceived biases. Some observers suggest difficult employees (the kind that might introduce foreign technologies) might be the most productive, and it's no secret happy employees are more productive than grumpy staff.

Consumers are speaking with their wallets as to what makes them happy. Apple's record sales attest to that. So what's the big deal? Configuring my iPad to securely connect to my office's Exchange server took all of twenty seconds. My organization's proprietary information is no more at risk than when I access the same information using a laptop in the field. But my ability to access my calendar, call up a contact and respond to client inquiries more quickly and easily, however, is significantly enhanced.

Countless other applications enable the iPad to solve traditional problems in new and creative ways. Keynote enables delivering presentations, numerous utilities enable connecting remotely to workstations and servers, and others empower connecting to WebEx sessions, updating social media tools used to fuel marketing efforts, and more.

iPads can reduce complexities, as they're less vulnerable to Windows laptop security issues, don't require as much maintenance as traditional computers, and are less prone to common disk errors. The tablet computers further enable remote connectivity (including Windows RDP compatibility) and generally better empower mobile employees.

Enterprise IT staff should consider its real mission, which should be to assist staff in simplifying processes, improving systems, enhancing communication, reducing costs, enabling productivity, assisting mobile access, driving profitability and even boosting morale. iPads, properly managed within the enterprise, can do just that.

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About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

178 comments
tommy
tommy

I've no problem with supporting devices that add flavour to the working environment. There are killer applications for tablet devices - I've used tablets before in a number of situations - but the iPad is not a panacea for all. It's a useful tool in a limited number of environments, but the answer to the question 'how will it improve our business?' will define which particular tools to use in my business, not whimsical musings on what it could do. If it can be shown that an iPad, or any other tool for that matter, will assist my staff in simplifying processes, improving systems, enhancing communication, reducing costs, enabling productivity, assisting mobile access or driving profitability then bring it on. To suggest that corporate IT Departments should be supporting iPads, or any other bit of consumer tech' that staff have bought on a whim, on the basis that it may improve moral is ridiculous.

l_creech
l_creech

If the iPad software is iTunes or anything like iTunes where it requires a 100MB download every time it needs updating it'll stay out of my network. Apple needs to climb on board the patch wagon and just release patches in a manner similar to most Linux distros, Microsoft, Adobe, and others instead of requiring a download of the entire application suite for every update. FWIW, there are no iPhones or iTouch devices and no Apple software allowed on the network due to Apple's collective heads being so far up their collective ..... This won't change until Apple changes how they do business to a more streamlined and efficient method.

jerrym
jerrym

IT should never deploy what it doesn't understand. I totally agree with users(IT customers) wanting the iPad and truly appreciate the impact on social culture within the company being enhanced through happy employees. However - there is a real duality between SECURITY and USERS. It is essential that IT applies the best critical thinking in how to adopt the iPad while satisfying the duality of security and users.

papaspence
papaspence

Most companies only support company issued hardware and do not support personal hardware of any type. Why? because they know exactly what it is, how it is configured and what should be running on it if they put it in place. Trouble shooting every thing else would be a massive pain.

Mylon2202
Mylon2202

Now here is some info for everyone who is too caught up in the hype of IPAD to realize it may not be the best device on your Corporate network. http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/04/ipad-fails-networking-101-how-to-earn-it-a-passing-grade.ars But unlike the iPhone, if the iPad screen turns off?either automatically or because the user pushes the wake/sleep button?it keeps its WiFi connection alive. The lower-level IP stack also remains active, as the iPad responds to ping packets. In this state, however, the iPad no longer pays attention to the DHCP lease time, so it keeps using its address even after the lease time expires. Waking up the iPad at this point doesn't solve the problem, either: it keeps using the address

frankshops
frankshops

Well, I have read many of the posts here and I really think that as with any new device or technology it is important to research the subject so that an informed discussion can be made. I fear that many of the people posting on this forum have not done their homework on the iPad or Apple technologies. If they did I think you would see that the iPad is actually a more secure, more enjoyable and by far more desirable than any of the other solutions available. My case in point would be the extensive documentation which Apple provides on the device and how well it does play in the enterprise environment. They have given this area a lot of thought and it would be best to educate ourselves on how this wonderful device can actually be used to make our lives easier rather than fighting against it for fightings sake. Please visit the link below to read the security brief by Apple for the iPad. http://images.apple.com/ipad/business/pdf/iPad_Security_Overview.pdf I remember a time when people thought it was crazy to have our whole lives on a phone, but now that is commonplace. I also know that although there may be wonderful technologies available on Windows, most times they are not implemented properly if at all to protect corporate data because of the complexities involved with establishing the rules. Just a thought... Thanks, Frank

plymouthduster63
plymouthduster63

There are two sides to this discussion. First, often the more creative users chaffe at being limited to what the company approves for use. I can identify with this feeling and often find better ways of working using devices that aren't exactly approved for use. On the other hand, company IT departments are tasked with security the company's information assets and supporting the devices that are in use by the company. If users are given a free hand in what they wish to use, IT departments struggle to keep the company's information safe as the devices that users decide to buy, often are not enterprise ready. There is also the issue with trying to support all these devices. Personaly, I'm not sure if the iPad will be more than a toy. I had an iPhone and could never really take it seriously because I could not use a bluetooth keyboard with it. Though I did like the fact that I could connect it to a television. I was an early adopter of the tablet format and still have the convertable tablet that I purchased 7 years ago, but the iPad would need to allow a bluetooth keyboard as well as include a USB connector before I could look at it seriously. As far as the security vulnerabilities of Windows, there are differing reasons for this. One is that Windows-based systems are so much more wide spread than Apple. When you are going to cause a disruption with a virus, you are generally going to go for the biggest bang. There are certainly many Apple evangelists out there that would argue that their OS is simply better and more secure than Windows, and maybe it is. Without more information on what hackers are targeting and why, it is difficult to say one way or the other.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

just not the device itself. ipad users also use other machines / systems.

macieku
macieku

I think there are few valid points in comments made by readers and I would love to see Mr Eckel defending his opinion.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

that a tablet PC /device or small laptop can't?

garyleroy
garyleroy

If people want to spend money and time on silly overpriced gadgets, fine. But don't waste your paid work time trying to figure out why some app doesn't work, and if you need a phonen number, I know a lot faster ways to get it. Just because some places are dumb enough to support iphones doesn't mean we need to compound their foolishness. These things don't improve anything, they just give gadgeteers something to play with, so let them play on their own time, and work at work.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Why should IT support another gadget? What advantages are this in a business over a laptop? All it is, is an overpriced toy that may be good at a few things but those things aren't necessarily business related. Can it do spreadsheets? Have a mail client? Do presentations [not just view but edit]? Having to support a Blackberry, on the other hand, is needed because it is a business phone. None of this app store crap [where under 2% of those apps are business related and probably even less useful]. Having to support iPads and iPhones ad complexities to a network - let alone open up security issues, additional support training, etc.

jayflex
jayflex

I think Erik Eckel missed the mark a bit with this article. I know that most places I've seen that won't support iPhonnes is not because they already have BES. It's more that you need iTunes to sync email with it. Also, Mac's have never played nice in a Microsoft environment. Even Aple's Safari has been know to have problems with SSL certificates and it's lacking compared to IE, Firefox and Opera. I believe Apple just doesn't have a very good track record in a corporate environment especially if its Microsoft. I'm not knocking Apple, they are second to none when it comes to slick designs. However, I think the iPad just follows suit with their other products not being a bussiness friendly tool.

forhanm
forhanm

Dead on - I hope their are enough IT people out there with your service (and results) oriented ethos.

Nsaf
Nsaf

the thing is a toy for toy lovers.

jhinkle
jhinkle

1) The iPhone and iPad may be neat gadgets but they're written in a OS that won't run the Windows CE/Mobile/XP/Vista/7 code that we use on everything around here. It's at a point where you can't just go back on all the code you currently use. To add to the problem Apple locks their products down even worse that Microsoft does. 2) You said "When users purchase iPads, they demonstrate interest in learning new and innovative technologies. These users reveal they?re willing to learn new ways of working. They show they are seeking new ways to improve communication, enhance productivity, bolster efficiency, and possible find new solutions to old problems." This is completely wrong in 95% of the cases of iPhone users that I've seen. In fact most of the people who have called me about setting an iPhone up on the Exchange server usually say something to the effect of "This is really shiny and neat" when talking about their new iPhone. People don't care about being innovative, they're mainly concerned with style and being able to twitter and facebook when they should be working. 3) When you say "Configuring my iPad to securely connect to my office?s Exchange server took all of twenty seconds." You're saying that you know how to use a computer, end user generally don't. When someone from 3 states away calls you about wanting to setup their Exchange account and you don't have good directions on how to to configure the thing it becomes an issue of support. Why should I have to support yet another device for end users? Especially when I already support so many? That's a big part of the reason why IT departments choose what equipment people can use because we know what users have and we have documentation on how to support it. If an end user wants to buy it for personal use that's fine, just they have to figure out how to set it up and manage it themselves. 4) You stated "Countless other applications enable the iPad to solve traditional problems in new and creative ways. Keynote enables delivering presentations, numerous utilities enable connecting remotely to workstations and servers, and others empower connecting to WebEx sessions, updating social media tools used to fuel marketing efforts, and more." We already have all of these tools in place. At this point you're re-inventing the wheel and adding more for us to support. And another point to make, very few people need to actually use social media. Time after time I have people breaking computers and wasting time while using facebook/myspace/twitter/whatever else they use and I'd prefer them doing less of it, not more. 5) You said "Pads can reduce complexities, as they?re less vulnerable to Windows laptop security issues, don?t require as much maintenance as traditional computers, and are less prone to common disk errors". But the iPad's been out for not even 2 months. Despite Apple's track record of not having Virii you can't say any of that until it's been out in the field for a while. In Closing, yes the iPad is a cool gadget but you're trying to say that IT should support something just because people see a cool shiny gadget that already does what their tablets are doing. But the reality is that if end users want it they can use it at home. For office work they use what is assigned to them to get their job done. If they're not happy with it they are free to go to a company that will indulge their tastes.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

You say: When users purchase iPads, they demonstrate interest in learning new and innovative technologies. These users reveal they?re willing to learn new ways of working. They show they are seeking new ways to improve communication, enhance productivity, bolster efficiency, and possible find new solutions to old problems. I say NO - They just want the latest new device to show off with and do not care about improving communication, enhancing productivity or bolstering efficiency.

adakar_sg
adakar_sg

I cant seem to find any uses the ipad does better than anything else for a business scenario.. everything an ipad can do my HTC cellphone can do.. Tablet computers have been around for a long time, i do believe they have been put to good use where there is a viable reason to use them.. with the ipad they serve no purpose that isn't covered by a more fit device..

fergusfog
fergusfog

I'm not sure I get you. all of the technology in the iPad has been around for a long long time. Sure, the first Tablet PCs didn't do so well, but they're all coming around again, and much better this time, it seems. Look at the number of slate machines coming out this year? Sure, only some of them are Windows and manageable from an IT Dept standpoint, but these are the ones you should be looking at for health care etc. I don't want my hospital records sitting on a stupid toy that Stephen Fry thinks is the best since sliced bread. God save us. It's time people grew up. You i-fanciers go and play with your pads, but leave the sensible IT to others.

andrew_grabowski
andrew_grabowski

We should support a device that opens up new security problems? That allows users to download music and films from unknown sources and possibly cause the company to be sued by any Music or Film company for breach of copyright? Sounds like good forethought has gone in to this blog.

Dyalect
Dyalect

Right into the waste bucket. The last thing any IT department wants is users bringing in toys and using them in a work environment. Support, integration, retraining. There is no benefit to these overpriced toys. Keep em' at home. We have enough headaches with "regular" desktop/laptop systems/users and keeping them secure, safe, and managed.

melias
melias

What are the under-the-desk support costs for the IPads? Are they REALLY worth the cost of teaching all your support personnel to work on? Also, how easy are they to integrate with Windows AD? For some reason ;-), I do not believe it is possible. If you are going to write an article so strongly urging integration of the IPad into the workforce you really should address these and other issues in the article, or at least reference articles where they are addressed. I can understand enthusiasm for a preferred device or manufacturer, but please keep the bias down to a minimum level. I can only see your post as so biased.

jpk
jpk

This device, and others like it, are coming. They're coming whether you like it or not because your CEOs, CIOs and CIwhatevers are going to have them, they're going to bring them in and you're going to connect them. Mark my words. Also, in certain verticals like healthcare, the companies that are driving the conversions to Electronic Medical Records (EMR) are coding for these devices. IT will either adapt or be pushed aside.

Erik Eckel
Erik Eckel

And we all know how stable Windows networking services are, right? Never had any trouble there, no sir. Rock solid. For the record, I use my iPad at numerous locations, I frequently log on and off networks, sometimes staying on some for a few days, other times changing frequently. In the real world, I personlly haven't encountered any trouble. Although I did continue working today when the rest of the state of Kentucky's government Windows systems (and others across the country) all failed due to security-related issues: http://bit.ly/9wwSXh

Brenton Keegan
Brenton Keegan

The main concern is really that it's unmanageable. Microsoft has put a great amount of effort into making their products manageable by network admins. They do this because they understand the need. Apple on the other hand has been historically pretty bad about this and thus they really don't have much in the business world. I need to be able to centrally manage settings/policies, applications, patches, authentication. I also need to audit the device and I need it to be done remotely. If a device is unmanageable it is inherently insecure. Show me a device that's manageable and I'll be more open to it.

Erik Eckel
Erik Eckel

Mr. Erik Eckel does not immediately reply because he's in the field using his iPad to troubleshoot and repair client problems. Actually, I wasn't aware of this thread until this afternoon. I really enjoy seeing readers feeling passionate about IT and, even more, taking time to read the articles I write. Every single individual posting a comment to this thread deserves a personal answer. Unfortunately, time just doesn't permit that. But I will stop when I get a moment and review the threads here. I'll work to post comments where I can, certainly. I agree there are going to be scenarios where the iPad isn't a great fit, but my fear is too many organizations will reject their consideration just because of rhetoric and false information or misunderstandings. To be honest, I wasn't going to buy an iPad. I purchased one because some clients have been asking how they might work in their business and TechRepublic indicated it will need some articles written about the device (I felt it would be ingenuine to write those articles about the iPad without actually having experience using the iPad). As I've been using the iPad in the field, I've been amazed at its capacity, its usefulness and its convenience. Call me whatever you want, but like many other consultants, I tend to gravitate toward what works. And, the iPad is making my job easier, and making me a more efficient consultant. I think those are good things.

Ryan_Fischer
Ryan_Fischer

I completely agree with you. I have a mix network at one of my sites, and trying to support the Macs with the Windows is a nightmare. I have to do twice the work.

online
online

The iPad is indeed a consumer device. It's not built to fit into a corporate environment, though it may well evolve into such a thing. The problem with much of the thinking I see on this thread is the consumers who will buy the thing. They will want to use it as a way to integrate work and life. Instead of saying "NoNoNo", perhaps IT's attitude should be "wait and see." The market will demand solutions, and all you need to do is explore them as they become available. Maybe you're too busy; maybe your company will never permit such solutions. But eventually, they will be there, whether you like it or not.

Snak
Snak

"When users purchase iPads, they demonstrate interest in learning new and innovative technologies......." What cak! When users purchase iPads, they demonstrate a sad need to be 'ahead of the pack'. Test it - release a gadget (it doesn't have to do anything) with more buttons and flashing lights than anything else and you'll sell millions. Look at the Tamigotu, for instance.

BobManGM
BobManGM

1. The article makes it sound like the iPad is the only "new technology" out there. There is a ton of new technology available and from companies that don't make such a "closed machine" and equipment that plays better in the corporate network. 2. I managed a 100% "Apple" network for 2 years. It took the same number of people and resource as any "Windows" network, but it when you scaled up...then it took more and cost more. Apple doesn't have the corporate level tools and a lot of what they do have costs more. 3. Apple makes really nice equipment, but their operating systems and network operating systems needs help. Things that should "adjust" to a change just don't and take user interaction. They have non-standard implementations of items that can cause all sorts of problems (we had a large issue with LDAP). Documentation can be a real hassle to find. 4. This is a pet peeve of mine; please stop telling me what I should do. Tell me what a product can do. Give me details. Give me a test product. But don't tell me I'm wrong and your right and here is why. I get so tired of that talk and shut down. I'm sure many others do too.

adakar_sg
adakar_sg

The timing i think is related to affordable SSD disks, thereby improving battery life.. other than that it brings nothing to the table except glare and fingerprints all over the screen

edh1215
edh1215

If your company doesn't block the downloading of music and movies over the network from the start, then there's a problem. We block all of that content here... adding an iPad won't change that unless the user is doing it over 3G. And at that point (3G) is the comapny liable? especially if the employee purchased the device on their own.

four49
four49

There's no reason you have to offer full support for everyone's device just because you allow it on the network. If something isn't officially supported, tell the users they are on their own. You can offer help on a workload-permitting basis, but there's no reason you should have to drop everything because the marketing guy can't get his iPhone to work with the conference room projector for his presentation in 5 minutes.

online
online

iPad users will rarely, if ever, want AD integration. What they will want is Exchange integration (already possible, at least on the iPhone) and possibly some sort of VPN or Citrix connection. All sorts of large corporate entities allow these kinds of connections with personal equipment. Generally speaking, people aren't trying to replace company-owned equipment, they're trying to supplement it. Why make it harder for the manager who likes to access his email on vacation...do you think he (or his wife!) really wants his company-issued laptop along in Cancun? Same with the IT guy who has to get onto the network while on his support rotation: if he can securely access and troubleshoot something while at the mall with his wife and kids, he'll want to do that with a device more portable than his laptop, which he can also use for his own purposes the rest of the time.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

on of the reasons they will not be in our business.

Tommy S.
Tommy S.

We will not connect ANY foreign piece of hardware to the corporate network. Whether they like it or not. If it is not purchased, configured and owned by the IT dept, its a no go.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

If you are an employee of my company and you want to carry a tablet, you will get the one HP is releasing. It runs Windows 7 and can run the full disk encryption software and all other security software and policies enforced in our Active Directory domain. If you don't want the HP one, then you go without.

Mylon2202
Mylon2202

Policies are the best fighting. One thing I can tell you working for a health care facility is that you will never see a EMR on a IPAD at all. Unless the place is asking to get in trouble. Also most places would already have desktops/laptops in ever clinic room already. We have been using a electronic booking software for a few years now so every room already has a computer in it. Why would you need an IPAD. Also it doesn't run a windows OS, nearly every company I know for health care software programs for windows and not a phone OS. How could you control security when the IPAD can't join your domain.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

There are a number of niche markets where these devices will fit nicely, medical records and stockroom / inventory among them. Many of these are already occupied by Windows-based tablet devices. iPads may compete in these niches at the workplace, but I don't see them breaking out of them for several years. Anybody coding SAP for one? Regardless, my CIO doesn't put up with outside equipment. She uses a company-issued Dell and Blackberry. I don't agree with all of her decisions, but I gotta respect a leader that sets an example by following policy.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't want to support personally-owned devices. If I break a company-owned system, I drag another one off the shelf and the user is up and running again. If I break someone's personal iPad (or any other personal equipment, it's going to come out of my pocket.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

over what the user downloads when they are on your network. There is no way to restrict this on an ipad. so when they are off your network on any other internet source, they can download at will. And this being a mobile device means that if your users actually have uses for this thing other than being a TOY, it will be connected to untrusted networks more than it is connected to your network.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If you're checking your work e-mail, you ain't on vacation. Your wife won't care what kind of device you're doing it with, only that you're doing it at all. If you can't manage your department to the point it won't run for a week without you, you need to change your managerial style. Emergency phone numbers are one thing; having to contact you several times a day is another. You're doing the company a disservice by acting 'irreplaceable'; what happens when you get run over by a truck?

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

AD integration. I REQUIRE AD integration. It is how we manage our devices and ensure our devices comply with our security policies. If a device isn't able to integrate with AD, it doesn't get put on our network. That includes the ipad. When you say "securely access" do you mean accessing a private network with a device that has no security built into it? That's not how our employees access our network.

Brenton Keegan
Brenton Keegan

It's not about what iPad user's want. It's about what is necessary to keep the network and company data safe.

four49
four49

You remind me of the mainframe guys who fought tooth and nail to keep PCs off their network. This battle will eventually be lost. Rather than being an obstructionist (and ultimately seeing your job outsourced to someone who will give users what they want), you need to accommodate reasonable user requests and develop policies to do so smoothly. When the VP of Sales, who brings in a lot of money, wants company email on his iPhone he will get it. Either from you or from someone more cooperative.

jpk
jpk

You obviously work on the institutional side of healthcare. I'll tell you right now that Allscripts will run on an iPhone or iPod touch today. This means it will run on the iPad soon if it's not already out for it. They're one of the biggest EMR companies out there. PCs in every exam room? How 20th century. Our doctors would shit a brick if we told them they had to pony up for that expense each time they opened a new office.

PlexusSage
PlexusSage

One of my clients owns a chain of tanning salons. The staff stand behind a counter to check people into beds, sell tanning packages, lotions etc. Here in LA and in a salon where people are trying to look good, the iPad might be a nice touch. Staff could greet people at the door, rather than behind a counter and escort them to their room while pulling up their account and setting the bed all from the iPad. Any tablet would work, but the iPad would be better for this particular demographic.

jpk
jpk

her CEO's kid makes him buy an iPad and he brings it to work. Then her tune will change :) I've been there before, seen it happen. One of the biggest issues with IT departments is that they're inflexible to a fault. Like a donkey on the end of a rope, pulled kicking and screaming into reality. But eventually a smart CIO will realize the futility of that position. Or not, but by then they'll be someone else's problem.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

If the CIO says we have a use for them, I won't have a problem. She ain't gonna say that this year.

Brenton Keegan
Brenton Keegan

Personally owned devices wouldn't be connecting to anything on my network anywhere. I was operating under the assumption that the iPads would be business owned.

four49
four49

I bet the fine is the same if the leak originated from a company-owned device, which has been the case for most of the big data breach stories I've heard. Just because the company owns it doesn't guarantee anything. Especially if the corporate-approved security software consists of worthless Symantec products. Confidential data doesn't belong on a portable device, period. Regardless of who owns it. Sensitive information should be kept on the servers; there is no reason to load a local copy. When the server connection is cut, no more data.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

as long as it meets my requirements for security and so long as they have no issue when I remote wipe the device, no problem.

travis.duffy
travis.duffy

Security policies and requirements are created for a reason. To protect the intellectual property and data of the entity. Regardless of how COOL or popular the latest FAD of a device is, if it doesn't meet these security requirements it does not get access to my network. End of story no exceptions. Making exceptions causes data breaches. When any of my higher management wants email on their iphone, they are told NO. It is not a company owned device and it is not secure enough. And my job is not going to get outsourced for it. I would be far more worried about my job getting outsourced if I actually allowed these terrible devices on our network and had customer information stolen because of it.

Tommy S.
Tommy S.

You might be the president of the company you are still not the owner... I have no problem if the IT management buy the iPads, but if it is a personal property, its simply not getting on the network. I dont know of any major corporation allowing anything that is now owned by the said corporation on their networks.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

an untapped and non protected web connection on 3G models that opens a door not scanned by corp equimpent for nasty's to get on to the corp network. Need I go on....

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

would you allow me to walk in an hook up a 64GB HD to the system, you know for downloading all the corp data!

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

?500,000 fine (max to a company) in the UK if personal data is leaked from a company. Still want those unmamaged ipads around now?

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

you will not mind everybody doing their own take on Project Management then. Anything they like, in your projects, at any time.

tbmay
tbmay

However, it's not ALWAYS good for the company. I'll agree IT is often obstructionist but from time to time it's for good reason. When I worked for IT departments, I followed policy. The policies made many users unhappy but these users were rarely in supervisory positions. As an independent, I deal with the business owners and managers. Small businesses are typically much looser with their tech than bigger organizations. If they want to integrate ipads, good for me, they pay for my time. However, in the interest of looking after the small businesses who often think every thing they ask for should should be a 20 second fix that really should be a freebie, I tell them in no uncertain terms that the RIGHT way to handle their business IT is to separate work and play, move cautiously, and avoid being taken by whiz-bang marketing. I have a number of recommendations for every small business network that includes, among other things, hard-drive protection for the workstations. This is often immensely unpopular with the typical users but it is one of the best insurers of productivity in the IT world. I submit that making users happy with tech toys is PROBABLY not the ultimate priority of ANY business. Generally we play at home and work at work. That's how I learned it anyway. At the end of the day, the leadership at every business has to make these decisions themselves and live with the benefits and costs. Either they are serious about security and productivity or they aren't. I can't make them be serious about it if they don't want to be. If we, as IT pro's have misgivings, we have a responsibility to make those misgivings known. If they are ignored, we've still done our jobs. Sure, there are some things I simply won't stamp my name on. However, I try to make sure when I make that decision, and have to part ways with a client or a potential client, my reasons are solid and I can look in mirror and be sure I did it for the right reasons. Right reasons: The technology is insecure. The technology is incompatible. The technology is illegal. Wrong reason: I didn't approve of that.

chriscampbellchr
chriscampbellchr

And spent billions doing so. They installed full-blown PCs in each exam room, and they're only function is that of a thin client. Furthermore they spent a lot of money framing it in a fancy aluminum wall mount too.