Windows

Microsoft offers $40 Windows 8 Pro upgrade

Windows 8 downloadable upgrade special runs until January 2013

Users in 131 markets will be able to take advantage of a pricing deal announced by Microsoft to upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista or consumer editions of Windows 7, to Windows 8 Pro for US$39.95.

To take advantage of the $40 special, users will need to purchase and download Windows 8 via Windows.com.

The pricing deal will begin with Windows 8's general release and continue until 31 January 31 2013.

Lovers of physical media will be able to create their own backup DVD or USB stick, purchase a backup DVD for US$15 plus shipping and handling, or a packaged DVD version for US$70.

Various degrees of migration will occur during the upgrade, depending on which past version of Windows the user is upgrading from.

"You will be able to upgrade from any consumer edition of Windows 7 to Windows 8 Pro, and bring everything along, which includes your Windows settings, personal files and apps. If you are upgrading from Windows Vista, you will be able to bring along your Windows settings and personal files, and if you are upgrading from Windows XP, you will only be able to bring along your personal files," wrote Brandon LeBlanc, Microsoft Windows communications manager.

During the promotion, Windows Media Center will be offered for free through the "add features" option within Windows 8 Pro, after upgrading the system. It was previously announced that Media Center would be available as a purchasable add-on.

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50 comments
jgsilva
jgsilva

I'll have to check which of our Windows XP/Vista/7 machines i would want to upgrade to Windows 8 a crippled desktop/laptop OS. Even at $40 why would any desktop/laptop user upgrade to Windows 8? Another question would it be is it possible to get a Surface machine with Windows 7?

Realvdude
Realvdude

For anyone wanting Windows 8. I'm not in love with the navigation on desktops. I also like that the Media Center is also getting thrown in (to stay on par with older OS). I jumped on an MS offer of 3 Win7 Home Premium upgrade licenses for $149 (w/ 32 and 64 bit media) and never regretted it. Two licenses upgrade Vista laptops and increased the performance of both, and the third set up a dual boot on a 64 bit AMD with XP. One of the laptops is fairly old and running a 1.3Ghz Celeron, so a Surface tablet may be more likely to replace it. Might also pop on it for the home desktop if I can dual boot, just to look at Metro programming.

kevsan
kevsan

From Microsoft when asked what happens when the final full version is released. I quote. "You will either need to purchase the final release or reinstall the version of Windows that was originally installed on your machine prior to installing the Release Preview. Q: Will I be able to upgrade from pre-release versions of Windows 8 to the final release? For those of you who have already been running the Windows 8 Developer Preview or Consumer Preview, you can install the Windows 8 Release Preview using the migrate option (just keep personal files), but not the upgrade option (keep personal files, apps, and settings). Or if you prefer, you can of course do a clean installation (keep nothing). The Consumer Preview release does permit upgrading from Windows 7, and will run the integrated upgrade advisor to check on any things you might need to look into. Please keep in mind that there is no rollback after an upgrade installation. We also strongly recommend that you perform a system backup prior to an upgrade, migrate, or clean install of Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Also note that the final release of Windows 8 will not support upgrading from any prior Windows 8 "Preview" release, though the migrate option will still be supported. In any upgrade scenario, you can run the Disk Cleanup Wizard to remove the previous installation in order to free up disk space. The download will also support boot from USB for a completely clean installation as well." So be aware and DO NOT install over your existing Windows or if you do be prepared to either pay up an unknown amount or do a clean installation of you old version. The offer is just another way for MS to suck out as much money from users they can. They don't even offer a rebate of what you pay for this per-release. Personally they can forget the offer.

jturner
jturner

I would be happy to try out Win 8 in a VM, but until I knew more about it I wouldn't consider upgrading any of my systems. If they're offering a promotion like this they are obviously afraid it won't achieve mass adoption. Ya get what ya pay for...

techracer7
techracer7

Is the extra licensing for the MPEG codecs so expensive ? Why would you pay to put that on your system when you could just add XBMC, Mythtv, Media Portal (all of which are far better) or anything else that it out there for free?

drp6149
drp6149

I decided to try the beta version of Windows 8--I immediately didn't like it! I decided to be fair I would give it a month for me to get used to it. I still didn't like it, I turned my computer on and clicked on the desktop square and then tried to do all my usual work and discovered that I used the start button much more frequently that I than I thought. I used several of Tech Republics info articles to add a start button and to find out how to find other things that I use frequently, and I hated it. When the month was up I redid my computer with Windows 7 and it works fine. One of my questions is "Is this Windows 8 getting such bad reviews that they have to run a cheap sale to even get it to sell. The other question is what is wrong with keeping a standard Windows version for desktops and laptops and having a different version that works on tablets and phones and other small computing devices. I borrowed a tablet from my daughter and tried it for a week and I don't want one unless I can install windows starter on it and use it that way. I have a version of linux on another laptop and I can use it without a problem.

jharvie673
jharvie673

After struggling to recover from an XP to W 7 learning curve (complete with no functional search capabiliy...) no way will I go to W8!

mmp138
mmp138

What about us who have Win7 Ultimate, or for that matter, Win Vista Ultimate. I'm not sold on this whole metro interface. I don't feel like it was ever intended for desktops. Though if the upgrade process was as resonable (or better being the already existing investment) I might consider putting myself through the whole re-learning phase. Personally I've been through literally every edition of windows (except BOB and CE). Metro is far to different to expect the existing user base to simply roll over and adopt. Especially when you consider the history of MS upgrade fees.

cybershooters
cybershooters

...is that it says it will run all Windows 7 apps as well as migrate all the settings over - which just supports what I've beens saying that Windows 8 is actually the smallest change ever made to Windows, not the biggest. There are some minor new things in it but the only really major change is the UI, the underlying OS is mostly the same. Personally I think I'll wait for SP2 for Windows 7.

stevewhateva
stevewhateva

Oh dear. Well Microsoft will offer this upgrade at a great price. What they are not telling you is, that the start menu will disappear, to be replaced by a metro menu. I have tested the developer and consumer versions of Windows 8 extensively. I have desperately tried to gain access to things I now take for granted in Windows 7. It looks very Metro like it's name, however has no real functionality for a serious computer user. Tasks that I could do easily now are a nightmare. I tried Start 8. This is a start menu made by Stardock, but it still was not what I needed. The only way I felt semi comfortable using Windows 8 was with a dock called Rocket Dock. I still had problems. Finding a program that you rarely use is so frustrating as you have to virtually go into the install drive to where the program folder is to run it. Who wants to do that with every program? If you made your own shortcuts on the desktop then you eventually will end up with a clutter of links and folders. The Start Menu is what made Windows so great to begin with. Apparently due to a customer experience survey nobody uses the Start Menu anymore. Dear Microsoft, Anyone with a little computer knowledge, will not participate in a survey, as they like to keep their files and activities private. Well good luck Microsoft. I just recently purchased another copy of Windows 7. I will not be upgrading to Windows 8 as it is now. However I would if it had the Start Menu.

catchacold
catchacold

I would love to purchase this but cannot find the download link on windows.com or this is not a option for upgrade anytime.

Nitramd
Nitramd

Assuming the upgrade comes with a product key, abiltity to store it on a seperate media form, can follow my retail win 7 to replacement new machines as required. Assuming it has VHD & Hyper V that will support the OS's I need, Then I might give it a trial.

pootegg
pootegg

$40 !!!! having tried the preview I am not really certain I want the new Windows 8 . My samsung netbook (Bios settings changed ) it loaded with an extra layer of tablet stuff which would not work until it fudged the screen resolution into funny shaped windows. The load onto my desktop again wants me to touch the screen ,, how many years has it taken me to educate people do not put your greasy fingers all over my display .. point but do not touch .. we now have Touch and smear by Microsoft ! At least we have an opportunity to Upgrade BUT why should it be more than the cost of the upgrade of those people who just bought a Windows 7 machine. Microsoft play fair please .. we suffered the Win Me , Vista debacle .. is 8 the next that we are being asked to pay for? Last week I needed an old record from a floppy disk .. incredibly the win 98 cyrix 233mhz ( cyrix - that is a former Intel rival guys) laptop burst to life .. loaded up office 97 and I was surprised at how fast it was compared to the bloats today. Is Win 8 a step forward or a leap into a chasm?

eScoop
eScoop

Not a thing says you have to INSTALL the upgrade. A $40 license is a $40 license. You buy it and put it in a drawer until SP1. You then let whatever problems work themselves out and install it if you so choose.

maszsam
maszsam

I can't wait to force feed myself all the usual problems of a new OS. I have a better idea; How about they pay me to try it instead? Or maybe we say I owe them $60 and for every item that doesn't work, or requires ridiculous tweaking they credit me $20 and in six months we settle up. Wanna bet which way the cash would go? Yeah right; PASS!

randy_scadden
randy_scadden

So here is a quick question traditionally in the past whenever you buy any type of OS from Microsoft they allow you to downgrade to any previous version of the OS. Hence the reason that the major OEMs could still provide Windows XP on their systems even though Vista was out and in the wild. So my question is if I take advantage of the $40 upgrade to Windows 8 Pro does that still entitle me to a downgrade to say Windows 7 Professional? Thanks, Randy R. Scadden

mayres
mayres

Hoild on Bud where did the offer to upgrade to * for ???14.99 Oh wait thats with new Comp Sorry

Realvdude
Realvdude

I use it as my PVR; fairly simple to use and works well. The only drawback is television playback; can't just copy a media center video to USB and playback.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Media Center for those who do the upgrade will be free of charge if purchased at the same time. That said, why bother with Media Center. Plenty of other DVD/Blu-ray viewers include MPEG codecs and will give better results and software.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

When they released Vista they made UAC a Nuisance which adversely impacted on users. Every new thing that they bring into the OS needs to work and Metro is a great idea for Mobile Devices but it shouldn't be the Only way to use a more powerful system. Unfortunately with the wide adoption of Mobile Devices the Desktop market has drastically shrunk so Microsoft has seen the Light and dumped the Desktop all together as a preferred Platform and gone with a Interface for Mobile Devices. I can sort of understand their aim here, though i do not necessarily agree the idea of having just the 1 User Interface for all devices, sounds on the surface like a Great Idea it just falls flat when it's tried with the Typical Microsoft way of telling how you will do things their way or no way. ;) The Metro Interface looks great for Mobile Devices and though I don't use one because I need more power it does look very similar to both the iPhone and Droid user Interface. I'm not sure just how well the current Preview Release will work on a Low Powered Tablet but I'm assuming it wouldn't be a great experience because of the limited processing power of most current generation Tablets. However when it's RTM and the Hardware Vendors specifically design Tablets and Phones to use 8 the initial High End Products should work OK. I would personally avoid the Lower End products available but that's no different for Computers or Notebooks the Low End Market always gets slow underpowered products and is a perfect example of [b]You Get What You Pay For.[/b] I can remember one owner of a Acer NB who was constantly complaining to it's maker & agents that it was useless. Everyone returned it saying it was working as it was supposed to but he found it way too slow and basically a pointless thing to try to use. I ripped the supplied RAM out of the unit fitted as much as the M'Board would carry for about $120.00 and he didn't believe that it was the same machine. Obviously the Maker and their Agents where correct in saying that it was working as it was designed to but what I found interesting was no one suggested upgrading the thing so that it would work decently. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Microsoft clearly said that they would not have a OS run as long as XP did ever again. They also clearly said that they would release a Major Service Pack at the 2 year mark and then a new OS which is a development of the previous OS at the 4 Year Mark. That was said when Vista was released and the time line is about right ever since. About 4 Years after Vista was released we got 7 then about 2 years latter we got SP1 for 7 and now we are looking at 8 which is a development of 7 which was a development of Vista. I see 8 as purely a Developed Vista and it being adapted for the Mobile Platform in conjunction with the now much smaller Desktop Market. 8 Is OK provided that you can avoid the Metro Interface on the Desktop, however no one is claiming that it's a new product just a developed 7 which again was a developed Vista. Col

Gisabun
Gisabun

Link won't be available until Windows 8 is RTMed!

essex133
essex133

Buying it now for $40 and putting in a drawer until SP1 is released sounds like a brilliant idea! So if UK users can get this Win8 upgrade for $40, I think I will try and snap one up and put it in a drawer as eScoop suggests ;-)

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Without any Install Media or COA is just that $40.00 going to Microsoft for nothing that is likely to be usable when it's needed if it ever is. The above article plainly says the $40.00 License is for a Download not any Install Media and as 8 Beta uses a 5 or so MEG Download which you run from your existing OS to download and Install 8, mostly without the need to enter a Product Key I would imagine that if you ever wanted to install the $40.00 License you would lack the means to actually load it. Personally I see most people who avail themselves of this Upgrade as either Installing the OS Immediately or they are just Donating $40.00 to Microsoft because they [i]Microsoft[/i] are Poor and need the Money much more than the people buying the Licenses. It will also allow Microsoft to boast just how many Licenses for 8 that they have sold which will give the impression that it is being adopted faster than it actually is. ;) Col

maszsam
maszsam

Great thinking eScoop. However, I recall that on some Microsoft product there was a time limit on licsencing/activating it. Can't remember exactly what, thinking an old Vista OEM package a customer wanted to use and I tried to activate over the phone, but could be wrong about the product, as in who waits so didn't seem like needed information at the time. Does any one know if these have time limits on the activation date for them?

Jeff7181
Jeff7181

A service pack will not fix the problem with Windows 8 unless it removes the Metro UI and puts a more traditional Start Menu back.

Gisabun
Gisabun

That's why you have the public preview and RCs. Try before you wish you didn't buy!

mark.cooper
mark.cooper

since last fall. You are NOT a guinea pig. You have the option of getting a massively tested OS for a minimal fee. Where do you guys come up with this cr@p? I'm sure Android/iOS/Linux is totally problem free when released. Any IT consultant worth their salt is worth far more than the $0 paid to debug a new Linux/Android OS or the few dollars required to upgrade to the latest Apple Mac OS.

dats_ripe
dats_ripe

You know what they say, if it is to good to be true you know it is, leave it alone. Why MS is doing this? I agree with you maszsa. too many times or should I say mostly all of the time MS roll out their stuff and they know it is not ready! We test it and give them feedback that they already know what is wrong with their stuff. If it is okay I will try it if I can downgrade to windows 7 pro otherwise I will stay with windows 7 home prem. which I am not happy with. No group policies as in Win XP pro.

Realvdude
Realvdude

I can recall the downgrade rights for the server OS to the previous version and also Vista to XP; which I believe was only for the professional version.

Ptorq
Ptorq

If this isn't the case it should be. It's a win for Microsoft on two counts: they get at least SOME money out of people who would otherwise stick with their current OS (most likely XP, maybe Vista) and bring them forward into 7-land, which means less legacy systems out there for them and their development partners to have to worry about.

jmaldonado
jmaldonado

As long as I can remember, when you purchase a MS product license, you also are granted the right to downgrade to any older (supported) version of the product, but as long as you keep within the same product line. I.e.: if you buy Windows 7 Home, you'd only have right to downgrade to a Home product, either Vista Home or XP Home, not to a Vista Business or XP Pro. The same principle applies either for OS and for Office products. On the other hand, since you'd be buying an "upgrade-license", you'd need to make sure you get upgrade media for the product you intend to use, either the licensed version or any older one. So If you intend to purchase an upgrade for Win 8 Home, I think you wouldn't expect to be able to run a Pro or a Business version, no matter how older the downgraded Windows version be (let alone the fact that installation media doesn't allow you to crossover product lines when upgrading).

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Coincindentally, I was just checking the prices to upgrade my Vista Home Basic to W7 Home. MS's web site says $119. I'd be all over a W8 license if it covered W7, but that's about the only use I'll have for W8.

gurusnord
gurusnord

Excellent question. I have no interest in running Windows 8 on any kind of desktop PC. If it could be used for a downgrade license for Windows 7 then that would give it tremendous value in my book.

Becksly
Becksly

Personally I downloaded the Win 8 "Consumer Preview" which came as an ISO file and installed it to a VMware Virtual machine. The Win 8 Release Preview acted the way you describe in that it downloaded a 5 or so MB installer. Assuming you're correct and that is how this $40 licence upgrade will also work. It still may be possible to get it and hold it as, if the upgrade works "exactly" like the Win8 Beta RP upgrade, there was an option within the Installation to download and create an ISO file to install on another machine or partition, before it installed over your current OS. So it might be possible that you could create an ISO to upgrade from later (naturally by burning it to a DVD if you are upgrading on a physical machine). But that assumes they do it "exactly" like the Win 8 Beta upgrade. MS may take that option out, which would be bad IMHO, As the only reason I would consider this $40 upgrade is if I could use it after a service pack is released, also knowing that if I waited that long it would likely cost well over $100. I guess we'll just have to wait and see how the download is actually offered & if it has some kind of special terms & conditions to it.

docstrange
docstrange

Lovers of physical media will be able to create their own backup DVD or USB stick, purchase a backup DVD for US$15 plus shipping and handling, or a packaged DVD version for US$70.

Becksly
Becksly

While I doubt MS will do it with a Service Pack, I'm guessing due to the number of people that dislike this interface someone will release something that fixes this allowing a more traditional Start Menu to be used, while still allowing access to the Metro interface for those that want it. Something MS should do, but probably won't.

maszsam
maszsam

Maybe from 30 years as a devloper and dealing with their sub-par stuff. Also have books written by MS employees detailing a corporate culture of dead line driven releases as opposed to releasing when ready. What is missing in any of these books is a bit about meeting customer needs and/or providing value to the end user. Maybe someone can refute that: one can't know everything. To be fair from what I have seen it takes three to five years to get an operating system right. Have tested a version of Unix and 5 flavors of Linux in the last 4 months. Also have XP and Win7 machines to test with. Suffered through Dos 4-6, win 3.1, 3.11 where viruses started a big presence, win 95, mostly driver issues, 98 which wasn't so bad but then IE three came and immediately completely crashed the system into a no choice reformat and redo, (that initial release was later described as more virus than program), then NT good stuff, Millennium (PU), 2000 a very good effort, then XP which after some initial tweak is still in my opinion the best they ever made, Vista, a total P.0.S until the service packs and then win7 which did nothing new for all practical purposes. Most people don't encrypt their drives, use specific Internet filters, but do use email of which win7 had no native email client. Oh yeah, but even with a bounty on virus producers that MS initiated, virus protection still takes up a chunk of cpu and power. After 30 years of dealing with MS, seeing first hand from hands on practical application, to include 16 years of field work supporting their products, having done web development since 1998, having read a minimum of 5 Microsoft books cover to cover and browsed maybe 15-20 more, having worked on more than 1,000 differnet machines, as in not 100 instances of the same machine in an in house environment, engineered from scratch as in spec the parts, order the parts, and assemble from pieces over 200 machines, used SQL server and others so I have some basis for comparison, engineered dozens of networks and implemented them to include doing all the cabling, and done who knows how many web apps, I have to think that I'm in a better position than most to evaluate a product at least from a practical application side. My opinion would be that unless you have a good reason, let the suckers test the new stuff. That is in keeping with the principals of logic. Bye the bye, your logic is flawed. Classic informal logic error argumentun populum. If the number of people who believed something was true or the number who did the same thing made something true then the world would still be flat. I don't test do testing for multi-billion dollar corporations or the government although I have taken parts of their products improved them and earned a fee from pleased customers. I don't see them testing my applications. Maybe for a small house or friend. I take pride in my work. Don't think MS or the Government does. I know from some of the books I've read, some Microsoft employees are embarrassed by their company. I would be. My current vote for best operating system and most improved over the last 4 years is Ubuntu. Free C++ compiler, graphics, vector graphics, video editing, IDE, on and on. You do have to learn the OS to feel good about it though. The biggest problem with MS is the black box of it, okay maybe after the virus thing. If you learn Unix or Linux properly you learn how a computer works. If you learn MS all you learn is how MS works. And then of course MS is not very stable as defined by: not crashing (MS doesn't crash any more, well maybe viruses but that is not relevant for this comparison as it is only their fault by negligence, you could argue willful negligence, not commission) or changing to where you spend hours relearning the system. MS fails on that part of the definition of stability. However again to be fair, things need to change as hardware improves. Still waiting for programs that actually use all the cores at the same time when they run instead of load balancing though.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

They stated quite clearly then that they where getting 4000 new faults reported per day after the release of Vista so while it was tested by Beta Testers it was by no means a Fault Free System. If your statement was correct Microsoft would not be releasing Patches or Hot Fixes for any of their products but none the less XP is still getting Patches applied and that has to be the Most Tested & Used OS Microsoft has ever released. There is a very good reason why all IT professionals say Never adopt any New Microsoft OS before the First Service Pack. They are in no way implying that all of the problems have been fixed just the really nasty ones that slow down work and cost companies lots of money have been fixed. There is also a very good reason why most companies are still running XP or have just moved to 7 bypassing Vista completely and that isn't because Vista is Rubbish just that their Upgrade Cycles do not agree with what Microsoft thinks that they should be. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

This Update/Upgrade relies on downloading and installing like the Beta of 8 does a 5 Meg Download and run it on your existing OS and it downloads then installs 8. You get to print off a Product Key which many will forget about and just read it off the screen when requested and then loose it. Then depending on which version of 8 you end up with it may not be one of the Higher Versions which has the Backward License, remember Vista Home doesn't qualify for the Backward License Agreement it has to the the Professional or higher versions just like 7. Also as we have yet to see the Licensing Agreement for 8 yet it's hard to say one way or the other what Microsoft will actually do in regards Licensing 8 let alone what the License Conditions of the $40.00 8 Upgrade is. I haven't used any Microsoft Upgrade Product ever and I seem to remember that a long time ago when I made the decision to avoid them it was because they had a different License Agreement. Anyway without a COA or actual Install Disc just a Repair Disc for use after the product has been installed & Activated I personally can not see too many stripping it out and loading anything. I Dual Boot this system with XP Pro as the Base Install and 7 Pro 64 Bit the Second OS in use and to be perfectly honest I'm mostly using XP for daily use with only the occasional drop into 7 for anything but supporting 2 small clients that has 7 on their system. With the loss of a perfectly good scanner and several printers not to mention a Web Cam I currently don't see much of a need for anything but XP and to be perfectly honest I can not see myself replacing several thousand $ worth of Printers and a couple of Hundred $ for a 7 Compatible Scanner as being a worthwhile use of my money at the moment. Maybe when I replace 2 Color Lasers and the B&W Laser I could comfortably shell out a couple of Hundred for another Scanner and another 7 compatible Negative Scanner which I use a lot and it would be nice to be using all 16 GIG of RAM in this unit and maybe I could even justify upgrading to 24 GIG if I was using a 64 Bit OS all of the time. Though I honestly think that maybe loading some form of Unix/Linux as a 64 Bit OS and continuing to use the existing hardware with maybe a CPU change to an i7 from the i5 would be far more likely for me to do. ;) Col

info
info

I never checked into it for Windows 7, but for Vista you DIDN'T have downgrade rights unless you purchased the Ultimate version (can't remember if it applied to Business/Pro)...

Gisabun
Gisabun

Don't count on it. You can't upgrade just to downgrade. Downgrade rights - if they allow it this time - would be for a new computer only.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

But a Backup Disc which is actually a Repair Disc as per what you can do with 7 is not a Install Disc. The Same applies to actual Physical Media in [i]purchase a backup DVD for US$15 plus shipping and handling[/i] is not a $40.00 License either it's if anything a $55.00 + License Fee which will be considerably closer to the listed $70.00 as stated in [i]or a packaged DVD version for US$70.[/i] So as I said above for a $40.00 License it will be practically impossible to use this License unless you install it immediately. Even then I would ask if you need at some point in the future to reload the system will the Rescue Disc that you made be enough to reload the system with your Paid For Upgrade License? Col

Gisabun
Gisabun

MS is probably having this upgrade price because they know by now that the Metro interface will bomb on non-touch screens.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[i]If you operate on a sealed system without outside connections, using only hardware from the tested and approved list, install it properly, and only install applications (never updating them, of course) from the tested and approved list, then I suppose it's a reasonable requirement of expecting a bug-free system.[/i] If you never update you never plug the holes in the OS and I wasn't referring to Hardware Patches above but Security Patches which are what is released during the Monthly Patches by Microsoft. Not really sure where the reference to Apple comes from or at least that is the way I'm reading your bit above as they are the only company with a Closed System on Restricted Hardware that I'm aware of. The above post was in response to a post which clearly said [i]Us guinea pigs have downloaded and run the various iterations of W8 since last fall. You are NOT a guinea pig. You have the option of getting a massively tested OS for a minimal fee.[/i] I was just pointing out that 8 is no where near as Massively Tested as the poster was claiming and they with previous Microsoft Releases there are massive problems present when the system is released. It's not a uncommon occurrence for most IT Pros to say that you never load a new Microsoft OS in a production environment till the first Service Pack comes out at which time the worst of the problems have been addressed. As far as I know that is still the firm belief that is expounded by everyone working in IT except Microsoft. ;) Col

garyleroy
garyleroy

"They stated quite clearly then that they where getting 4000 new faults reported per day after the release of Vista so while it was tested by Beta Testers it was by no means a Fault Free System. If your statement was correct Microsoft would not be releasing Patches or Hot Fixes for any of their products but none the less XP is still getting Patches applied and that has to be the Most Tested & Used OS Microsoft has ever released." If you operate on a sealed system without outside connections, using only hardware from the tested and approved list, install it properly, and only install applications (never updating them, of course) from the tested and approved list, then I suppose it's a reasonable requirement of expecting a bug-free system. Windows has to operate on all sorts of hardware from unknown and untested sources, on millions of machines with users who install every junk piece of software or game they can get their hands on, while connected via a network to billions of computers, many of which are owned by people determined to hack into, barrage with ads, or spy on every other machine out there that they can find a way into. And you expect them to release an operating system that's "finished", ready for any and all things, past, present and future, with no updates needed, and never a bug showing up. My toaster works that way. To expect that from a dynamic environment such as a computer is either extremely naive or truly ridiculous.

purevw
purevw

I would think that as long as you have you original Win XP, Vista, or 7 disc and key, all you would do is to uninstall 8 and re-install the older system. If you don't have the older Windows disk and / or key when you do the upgrade, you're most likely stuck. I seriously doubt that they would supply an older version for downgrade, with this being a "special offer". If you buy an oem computer with Win 8 and the masses are screaming that they hate it, Microsoft may offer a similar downgrade to 7 as they did in the past with others.

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