Windows

The Upside: Big year ahead for Microsoft

The coming months will determine whether Microsoft's next generation of software can turn around attitudes towards the company.

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In the next few months, the launches of Windows 8, Microsoft Surface, and Windows Phone 8 will take place. The reception of these products will determine whether the online commentariat will continue to espouse the view that Microsoft is fading away, or see it as a giant, re-awoken.

Microsoft isn't dead, or dying. In fact, it wants to go for a walk. Of course, these days, that walk is covered by a veil of secrecy for reasons best known to those in Redmond.

What cannot be denied is the reaction to Microsoft's new interface, the framework formerly known as Metro.

In this podcast, James Bannan tells the story of how he was initially cautious of the new "Metro" visuals of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, but has come out the other side and warmed to the new interface. James also gives his thoughts on Windows Server 2012, and its accompanying Hyper-V implementation.

Also featuring in this episode is Microsoft Principal Consultant Chris Jackson, who delivered a talk on Windows 8 security internals at Tech.Ed Australia 2012, and getting to grips with the Windows 8 UI's new name.

Running time: 17 minutes and 23 seconds.

Disclosure: Chris Duckett attended Tech.Ed as a guest of Micrsoft

About

Some would say that it is a long way from software engineering to journalism, others would correctly argue that it is a mere 10 metres according to the floor plan.During his first five years with CBS Interactive, Chris started his journalistic advent...

8 comments
Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

around here all follow the rules from Microsoft about student copy sales and ask to see some ID and your current student registration, noting them on the sales record. Mind you, I talking A$ not US$ and that may change the price a little.

jonc2011
jonc2011

Which means anyone can buy it for personal use, even in Australia (where I also live), though I bought it for STG60 in UK.

jonc2011
jonc2011

In fact more positive now than it has ever been. When I can buy a suite of products as good as Office 2010 for $100 OEM, then it is hard to be critical. Adobe want to charge me $700 just for Acrobat - lucky I can upgrade. MS's approach to security also now seems good, while Windows 7 is a great OS. Fingers crossed for Windows 8. Office 2013 I am sure will be good. BTW my first experience with MS was with word processor and spreadsheet ROM packs on an Australian Dulmont Magnum - the world's first notebook computer in 1980.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

to be wasteful of time and wasting space on the work area. I prefer the look of Office 2003 but Microsoft made sure it don't work well with the new generation of Windows. Thus I use Libre Office and it's free while doing a better job than MS Office as unlike MS Office it will safely and natively open and work with the older MS formats of Word and Excel - something MS Office does NOT do. Libre Office also work nice on PDFs and has a one click way to create a good PDF. BTW Where and what version of MS Office 2010 do you get for just $100.00 - the best deal I can see around with a disc (ie. not just a licence) is for a Student pack which requires you to be a registered student of an approved educational institute and the it only has Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and One Note for $129.00 - you need another $300 if you want the version with Access and Publisher.

jonc2011
jonc2011

I bought OH&S for £60 with a new computer this year. I agree that Office 2007 was c__p, but 2010 is IMO better than 2003. Only problem is that it is difficult to customise macro buttons. If you use the quick access toolbar, you rarely need the ribbon (which I also don't like, but which you can minimise). I use an old (genuine) version of 2003 which gives me Access, Project and Visio. I also use OpenOffice from time to time.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

around here all follow the rules from Microsoft about student copy sales and ask to see some ID and your current student registration, noting them on the sales record. I tried Office 2003 on a copy of Win 7 and not everything worked right. In the end I gave up and moved to Open Office, but after Oracle started fighting with the tech staff on that they left the OO project and started Libre Office, it's better than MSO or OO and each new update reduces the dependency on Java that Sun started some years ago.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

hardware vendors to include a copy of Win 8 as part of all their hardware sales and then point to the great sales shown, despite all the systems that come with the backwards upgrade to Win 7 where people wipe Win 8 and load Win 7. What should be looked at to see if Win 8 is a success is how many copies are sold as retail packs and not with new hardware, and compare that with the rate of past retail sales.

don
don

I agree that the upcoming year is likely to be a big year for Microsoft, but not for the reasons you mentioned. They will release a new version of Exchange and Office. Those are almost assured to be successful and will drive revenues up. Windows 8, the Surface, and Windows Phone 8 will take more time to become popular.

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