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10 boring phrases you should cut from your resume

When creating a resume, it's easy to fall into the habit of using old-hat expressions. Here are 10 that have become meaningless and should be avoided at all costs.

When creating a resume, it's easy to fall into the habit of using old-hat expressions. Here are 10 that have become meaningless and should be avoided at all costs.

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I ran across a piece by the esteemed Liz Ryan, a 25-year HR veteran and former Fortune 500 VP, that just made me cringe with recognition. She wrote about those trite phrases that inevitably make their way into our resumes. It's one of those things many of us do by rote without considering that they are red flags for, as Ms. Ryan puts it, the "vocabulary challenged."

Before I list the phrases, let me explain a little about why they should be run out of town on a rail. Have you ever sat through a speech by a company executive who seems to communicate solely in business cliches? He'll speak of synergy and paradigm shifts and value-added propositions until you want to impale yourself on the nearest sharp object. And the only value you take away from a speech like that is that you are, in fact, capable of a boredom-induced vegetative state.

Cliched forms of speech are crutches for the uncreative. And the frequency of their usage make them absolutely meaningless.

So do you want your resume to say, above everything else, that you are incapable of forming a new thought? No, you don't. You also don't want the people reviewing your resume to gloss over these trite phrases and not give you a chance. That's why you should strike every occurrence of the following from your resume:

  • Results-oriented professional
  • Cross-functional teams
  • More than [x] years of progressively responsible experience
  • Superior (or excellent) communication skills
  • Strong work ethic
  • Met or exceeded expectations
  • Proven track record of success
  • Works well with all levels of staff
  • Team player
  • Bottom-line orientation

Find better ways of saying these things. After all, just because you think of yourself as a results-oriented professional does not necessarily make it fact. Why not just list your actual results? You have a proven track record? Proven by whose standards? And if there is a "record" of it, why don't you just give me its contents?

Met or exceeded expectations? Whose expectations? The guy down the street at the coffee shop? Tell me instead about the time you had to lead a project with a seemingly impossible timeline and budget.

I think you see where I'm going with this.

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About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

193 comments
joshuawhite33
joshuawhite33

Great peace of information and tips. I would like to visit this wonderful blog again and again. Thanks. www.jobpiraten.com

iowastate
iowastate

I suppose even if you can have that documented it is not something that most places list as a "proven track record" - but it sometimes helps get you where you are going

jamjube
jamjube

Here is the guy I will hire .. when I start getting resumes like this! Hello, My name is Duka Partir and I am looking for work in the field of software development. I have attached my resume for your review. Not listed on the resume, but listed here, are the following additional "skills" that I have: Business Skills I know how to code. I know how to comment my code. Self commenting code is a pipe dream pushed by folks that do not understand what it is to be a maintenance programmer, or to be someone that has to take over the project if I wrap myself around a telephone pole. I know what a code review is and what it is for. I do not get defensive at a code reviews. I welcome them as Peer Reviews. I know what a prima-donna is, and I am not one of them. Software has a lot of component parts and there are other manufacturers (team members) that I will have to interface with. If I can't get along with my team members, then that can impact what the company is trying to do. I know that the company does not exist for my personal enjoyment, and that I work for the company, not the other way around. Accordingly, I do not expect anybody to send a limo for me at the airport, nor do I expect the company to support a cafeteria, or have a jogging track, or volleyball courts, etc, where I can get recreation. I understand that crap code, while it may work out in the short term, can end up being a nightmare to maintain. I also understand, however, that there has to be a balance between getting the product out the door and having a perfect architecture to the underlying code. My employer is not paying me because he wants a perfect architecture, he is paying me to be able to balance perfection against being able to have a product to sell that will pay the light bill .... and my salary. Regarding salary, I perfectly understand that whoever hires me is most likely working on a project that nobody else has thought of before and is risking a lot to try and bring their product to the market. This risk is something I do not have to take, and so I expect that, while my employer may pay me $60/hr to code, that they expect to make $600/hr off my efforts, which will happen ONLY if they can get enough customers to buy the product. I am OK with this. That is how business works and how it should work! If I ever start my own business, this is how I expect the "spread" to be. I know how to complete taskings. In saying this, I mean that my work is not a hobby, to be done when, and if, I feel like it. (OK, I will play a video game or two every once in a while.) I understand that my job is to turn out code and meet milestones. In addition, I am not one of those who, on getting bored with some aspect of work, will try to convince my boss that we really really need to refactor to code to the latest new language like CoffeeBean, or Caffeine++. Translation: My job is to work thru the parts of my job that others might see as mundane, and my advice to any subordinates that come griping to me about not being "self-actualized" 100% of the time will be to "Get over it". I know how to go to my boss and advise him when I am running into, or think I am going to run into, problems. I do this because I do not want him to have egg on his face at the next progress meeting. It makes him look bad, and it makes me look bad. I know how to come into work on time. I know that if there is a team meeting scheduled at 9AM that I need to be there a 8:50! I understand that software is intellectual property and that the people that hire me are taking a big risk in trying to do something new, and that what I develop while in the employ of others is THEIR property and is work made for hire. For example, if my company hires me to develop an interface for banks that hooks into Solaris or other systems, I consider it unethical for me to approach others, such as auto parts manufacturers, to try and sell them the same solution that I was paid to develop for someone else. I will retain no copies of my code or architecture after I leave and essentially will do a core memory dump/wipe of proprietary knowledge before leaving. I do not expect any turkey at Thanksgiving or Christmas. I do not want any raise at Christmas, or New Years. I do not want any bonus at Christmas, or New Years. I do not expect any bonus at all. I am supposed to do good work. The pay my employer gives me is my bonus. If I do get a bonus, I will not use that to set in motion an expectation or obligation for future bonuses I know how to handle money, both business and personal, and I have a problem with folks that think that their employer is screwing them over because they cannot control their personal spending. I am not interested in having affairs with office workers .. or anybody else. My personal life DOES affect my business life, and accordingly, I understand that I need to be as diligent in that personal life as I am at the company. I know how the chain of command works and that going over, or around it, can lead to disruption of the business operations. I know how to pay attention at meetings. I know what a suspense file is. I understand that accounting really does need my travel receipts and that the accounting department is an important part of the business too. Personal Skills/Attributes I know how to take a bath and shave and brush my teeth. I know how to shake hands properly. I know what clean clothes are. I know how to hold my knife and fork properly. I know how to write a thank you note or a follow-up to a colleague I met at a business meeting. I know how to handle money. I do not live beyond my means and I pay off my credit cards every month and have never paid interest on credit card debt. I like to read. If you are interested, please give me a call. Thank You.

zmoinuee
zmoinuee

If Hiring Manager doesn't have time to read Resume then he/she MUST be fired IMMEDIATELY, their job is to read resumes COMPLETELY and hire a best one not a ONE page resumer.

LocoLobo
LocoLobo

become cliches with overuse. So we dump these phrases but start using a "new" one which soon becomes meaningless. People imitate each other. So people copy parts of what they saw as successful. Sometimes the new/creative phrase is totally misunderstood. This is not an easy process for most of us. We want the "Magic" resume that guarantees an interview. Your article seems to say, "Be more specific, be more personal." That sounds good to me, but if I send you a 10 page resume, will you read it?

espici_2
espici_2

First the agencies tell us to put the words IN, then they tell us to take 'em OUT! MAKE UP YOUR MINDS!!! ;) Seriously, though, when agencies actually look at the resumes, instead of glomming on one or two keywords, often spit out of computer job-to-applicant matching software, which, equally often, have nothing to do with the job (the stories I could tell you!), THEN I'll do what you say! Until then, my resume stands as a work of art (now, if I can just get someone to read it!). ;) http://cunix1.webng.com

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Yep, boring phrases. However, they're also often considered key performance points that need to be addressed when considering someone for hiring or promotion. Just list them as you do in your article, and it makes a document that reads much like a copy of John Kerry's performance evaluation, written while he was in the Navy, I once saw. In short, meaningless drivel. Polite meaningless drivel, but meaningless nonetheless. Which was the evaluation author's intent. At the time, and perhaps still, Navy performance evaluation writers were required to address certain points as concerns a person's performance. And many of the items you listed were areas of performance that needed to be listed, and some comment made as to the subject's performance in those areas. So, for instance, one often saw sentences like, "Works well with others", "A team player", "Met or exceeded expectations", and so forth. For the reader of said evaluations, one just noted the fact and considered it as nothing more than a bullet which explained what the next statements would be about. The next statements were supposed to be FACTS to justify the precursor statement. i.e. You read, "Met or exceeded expectations", so next you expected to see something that'd explain exactly what the evaluation author meant by that. After all, "Met or exceeded expectations", in and of itself is quite meaningless. Could mean a high level performer, or it could mean the subject person was the kind of person only capable of a little in the writer's opinion, but he did meet your LOW expectations. "Gets along well with others"? That means what, exactly? That the person in question is well liked, always the life of the party, etc? Might be a good thing. OTOH, it also might be that the person is one of the "good old boys" that everyone likes because he or she doesn't make waves, doesn't do such a good job as to make others look bad in comparison, and so forth. So a reader of such documents as I mention, notes the "catch phrases", but does not make a judgment based upon those. Rather you consider, carefully, the statement that follows. For instance, in a copy of one of John Kerry's performance evaluations I read, reference was made to the fact that he got along well with others and was well liked by his men. But the following statements were silent as concerns key factors one would want to know more about in this area. i.e. Since he was an officer and supposed leader, was he also able to "kick ass and take names" (said in more polite and official terms) when necessary, while still maintaining his people's respect? Their respect of his judgment, leadership, and ability to accomplish the task at hand being considered far more important than whether they actually liked him or not, and whether or not he was the kind of guy they wanted to party with. "Met or exceeded expectations"? What did the evaluation author mean by that? What were his expectations of Kerry? Little was said about that. In Navy evaluations, silence is often deafening. What is NOT said, is often more important than what is said. There are a couple reasons for this. If the evaluation author makes an actual negative statement, the reader then expects to next find some statement indicating corrective action taken by the writer. A stern warning was issued, subject was given a punishment or corrective action to take. Etc. That's a lot of trouble and effort, read that to mean a lot of paperwork, time spent that might be wasted time, etc. So sometimes the evaluator, who is also that subject's boss, just leaves things go as is. Essentially saying, "Okay, he's there, he's doing stuff, but it's all unremarkable and I'm thoroughly NOT impressed. OTOH, he hasn't screwed up so bad I need to kick his ass." My point is, there is nothing inherently wrong with the phrases you list. But alone, by themselves, they prove or show NOTHING meaningful. Not unless followed up some strong, measurable, statement of facts to put each phrase in context as to what it really means.

rdtraversi
rdtraversi

I resisted these god-awful phrases for years but was always quickly culled. Everyone in the hiring biz spoke in these idiotic phrases and sent on the resumes which contained these platitudes of mediocrity. How about a sampling of what this HR genius thinks will work everywhere? I spent more time changing my resume for every contact than I did actually doing the job. This cluck wanted a vitae down to the week; That cluck wanted less than a page in 12 pt or larger type; The other cluck wanted no cliches; MOST clucks wanted all the cliches.

michael.e.garrity
michael.e.garrity

HR should lead by example in the job requisitions and job ads they compose before they start classifying job candidates for being "vocabulary challenged". Most of the job ads you see are recycled buzzwords and phases copied from previous ads: We're looking for a "team player". "Must be experienced in full SDLC"etc.

moxydigital
moxydigital

What phrases do you suggest to replace these?

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

I would totally agree with the entire list with the exception of one "More than [x] years of progressively responsible experience." I did not include this in a resume, and was excluded from a hiring list. The reason, I did not state or show progressive responsibility. It was an internal Hire, so I was lucky enough to fight it. The thing to remember is that most of the HR folks have no IT experience or knowledge when it comes to our careers... More like good little worker drones in the personnel hive if you will. I think you should always tailor your resume for the company you are trying to get hired/promoted in/into.

alvaro
alvaro

I agree with most of it; additionally I would you recommend to try to follow [sometimes between lines] what the demands ask! Occasionally the cliches might help. Try to fit the requirements. Good luck all Alvaro de Portugal alvaro@casema.nl

barg8
barg8

All of these phrases come from job descriptions written by HR departments. These are the general descriptions to which the applicant needs to respond in specifics; not parroted back. However, I have seen advice to incorporate the specific words "please" the machine reader.

vucliriel
vucliriel

These folks should be reading Dilbert... They'd probably learn a lot about thmeselves and literally get the picture of why these expressions have become so meaningless!

gadjet
gadjet

After 30 some odd years of writing resumes and receiving resumes to have to hire someone ... the first thing, always, have a cover letter, specifically written to the company, job, and life you are appling for. It is generally the most personal and educational aspect. Secondly, use the KISS principal, "Keep It Simple Stupid", if you think every resume gets read in its' entirety your nuts! We get hundreds if not thousands for each job posting, usually 90 percent don't make it through the first look, out of that, 90 percent don't make it through the second. for those of you that use acronyms or technical or trade specifc jargon, DO NOT! Just because you know what it means doesn't means that the person reading it does and for example I do not know what "WoW" or "MMOrgh" or what ever is, and frankly I don't give a crap! It doesn't matter what postion you are being hired for, you have to be able to communicate with everyone, ultimately in the world. And the last thing you want to do is piss off the one reading it by making them feel stupid for not knowing! I don't care what you did last summer or 10 years ago if it doesn't pertain to the job you are applying for. If you can make it apply go for it, I'm not going to think about it for you. That leads to the next BIG issue, use proper english or at least words that ARE in the dictionary, write at a grade eight level, that is the literacy level of most of the people that first read your resume, if they like it it goes on. Your cover letter and resume "show" if you've just thrown it together, start early, put in some thought and research, find out about the company etc. make the cover letter and resume specific to the postion and company you are trying to work for. Have everything proof read, I would be more than rich if I had a penny for every resume we could not contact because of a bad phone number, name or address. If asked for references, give them! and they will be contacted, so make sure they are valid, if they are not, that resume doesn't make it through. If you do make it through to a interview, first, show up and be early, dress for success, not for a night out, I don't give a thought to what you look like on your time, on my time, you have to be conformist and not offend any of my clients no matter how conservative they are, ultimately they pay your wage, not me! We all serve somebody! As for the rest, I could go on for hours, use common sense, and smile through it all.

ramba
ramba

I completely and wholeheartedly disagree with this writer. Anyone who has held a management or supervisory role understands the terms the writer mentions. When coupled with quantitative expressions of achievements, such terms should gain a hiring manager's attention and secure the interview, which is the whole point.

echerlin
echerlin

I was taught, at ProMatch in Sunnyvale CA, to replace all generic claims with PSRA stories showing how I went beyond the mere job description and accomplished something of value. We all practiced 15-second elevator pitch versions and longer versions, and we practiced listening to the interviewer for opportunities to bring in a relevant PSRA story. A more recent development, which I have heard is catching on in a big way, is replacing your resume with a digital portfolio of your work. You can apply the PSRA principle there, too. So I never say, "Good listener." I tell people how I broke a logjam in an IETF standards process (P) by listening. Both sides were talking past each other--"We absolutely have to do this." "No, we can't, it will break everything." "No, it won't, and besides we have to." It turns out to be easy and clean, once we addressed the issues on both sides about using ASCII-encoded Unicode. (S) We ended up agreeing on what to do and how to do it, and the standard was completed and put into use. (R) I listened to both sides and translated what they said from objections (You can't) into challenges for the other side (Well, then, you have to). You say this is an easy programming task? Let's see a two line script for it. You say this is too complicated for people? How about these high-school classes in Japan where everybody learns it, using this step-by-step procedure? Oh, if you're wondering what it was all about, that's part of the point of PSRAs. Get the interviewer asking questions on your terms. It was about using multilingual URLs, of the form http://www.????.com/ (not a real example), within the all-ASCII HTTP protocol, without breaking compatibility. The _real_ problem was that people couldn't use the Internet in their own languages, in their own alphabets and other writing systems. Encoded URLs provided a path to a solution, with the result that such URLs are in daily use. (Though not in the English-speaking parts of the Web.) The action of the people who formed the working group on the standard was essential, and I was glad to help out.

xmagoo
xmagoo

Ah, so we're all here just to entertain the satraps in the HR department.

jorgelazarodiaz
jorgelazarodiaz

I follow Toni's blog closely and have her in my www.CareerJockey.org blogroll. She always addresses interesting topics like this. It's so easy to fall into the jargon rut using phrases that don't really say anything. They certainly don't belong on your resume. Describe your accomplishments in terms you used before you joined corporate America. Using regular English on a resume might actually be seen as refreshing. Jorge Lazaro Diaz, CareerJockey.org

bzeuli
bzeuli

The value of using these boring phrases comes into play when your resume is indexed by a content management system. The person doing the hiring searches first on these phrases to narrow down their results. Substituting ?enjoys hard work? for ?strong work ethic ? might make your resume invisible to those searchers.

nightwatch
nightwatch

STRONGLY disagree. The first thing everyone must understand is that a resume is a "Cue" sheet which YOU give to the interviewer to get them to ask YOU the right questions. You WANT the interviewer to ASK... "Give me an example of how you are a results oriented professional". If you wrote out examples of all of these you would have an autobiography, not a resunme. And that is a far worse blunder than worn out phrases.

fvazquez
fvazquez

I don't know about other areas, but in Software design I always talk about where I have designed some software and which companies have it running, it works everytime.

dbecker
dbecker

I have written resumes for others and the resumes have done their job to get the people for whom I wrote them to get the job they were after. As a manager, I read through 700+ resumes in one day looking for a part time computer operator. I looked for any sign that the person had any ability or interest in actually being a computer operator. The HR person and I marrowed it down to 25 resumes in two afternoons. So many resumes [fortunately from my point of view] had absolutely nothing to do with the job at hand: It certainly made it easy to bounce the resume to the cold files. The most amazing thing I have always found is that it does not matter so much what is written on paper -- a thirty second phone call could be a make / break for lining up the panel interview. Certainly, based on the winner in the search, I would not have hired him at all based on the resume, although he ended up doing the most amazing job I have ever seen -- not just picking up all the duties immediately in one night, but organizing the work to a high degree of efficiency in two days. He worked alone... at night. The work got done and the quality was stellar. Not so good was someone who seemed OK to do the job, the resume looked good, but when she was on by herself, she panicked and bailed the first night and didn't even leave a message as to why she was gone -- in the middle of the night. Having said all that, I cringe at the thought of most of the technical jobs in IT needing a "Team Player". To me it signifies that the person is a smarmy socializer, pleasantly passing the day at the water cooler or over coffee discussing trivial junk not job related endlessly, wasting not only their own time, but the time of everyone around them. Let's finally face a reality that HR is not capable of understanding that programming, operating system support and computer maintenance [fixing hardware, preparing software updates and fixes] is a particularly individual job requiring the ability to NOT be distracted by people. It's fine to get along, but frankly, when I was a manager, I wanted the job to get DONE! Yes, IT service folks do need to be able to get along with people, but the last thing I want is "People Persons" who just have to continually socialize, or worse, narcissists and people with histrionic personality disorder distracting others with their outrageous behavior -- often sucking in the most productive, even if those who are productive are particularly professional. Worse are those "Team Players" who are charming psychopaths with their own personal agendas. Worse is the idea that some nim null has programmed code to pick up buzz words and phrases to insure that the resume has validity. Think about it: Some programmer working on a program on their own from specifications from HR to scan for "Team Players". Has anyone ever thought about the irony of that? So how does one represent the fact that they are responsible, pleasant with people, but at the same time able to be individualistic, bucking the crowd to do the right thing for the workplace? How would you suggest someone project their professional integrity as a technologist without being rejected because they neither use the phrase "Team Player" nor seem particularly interested in being a part of a mediocre lock-stepped moronic team of unproductive, if pleasant, losers unable to accomplish much of anything except exceptional socialization? I'm thinking that Generation Whine 20 somethings definitely have the edge here as "Team Players". I cringe at the thought that they become the keepers of IT to control the code that runs the company or agency. Just be certain that they find it "fun" and "meaningful" -- and don't forget to praise them, no matter how medocre or ghastly the job they do. Remember, they have an entitlement! They play well together. Be nice to them, or they will bail. Lord, take me now!

arthurborges
arthurborges

A friend of mine is a co-founder of Sogeti... you know, the company that has since become CAP Gemini. He once said that in job interviews, the interesting candidates were the ones that were hesitant and feeling around for their bearings. Meanwhile, the ones that walked into his office with smiles that irradiated his office with thermonuclear confidence were the ones that never got past probation period. Bottomline: Walk softly, carry a small stick and use with moderation. Arthur Borges in Zhengzhou

bofcarbon1
bofcarbon1

What if you end up having a Neanderthal review your resume? Will they be able to translate the work scenario examples you give to conceptualized value added assets? These phrases ended up in this resumes to pander to the people that sit up front and clap when the CEO uses the old worn cliches and were granted the right to hire. I've been working toward customized resumes generated from my job tracking web app for my contracing business. Government agencies often ask for redundancy in a skill set and use of a skill on a project. Its the way they have been trained to review. They don't think (uh oh here comes another cliche) outside of the box. The point I am making here is that this is a two sided issue. I agree that too many cliches are not appropriate but on the other hand I'm worried that having a sound grasp on the English language with equally good writing skills will become a lost skill and we will get comfortable with sounding more like bots.

g01d4
g01d4

Are like those using the cliches - though they may occasionally have something useful to say :)

pjwvieviwdhy
pjwvieviwdhy

I think that I dont like your comments since they only show the subjects...I dont want to click each of these...

dr.s.raghunathan
dr.s.raghunathan

three levels top, middle and bottom. The above 10 phrases may be avoided for top and not for other two levels since words usage only can reveal the inner leads of brain

mwlod
mwlod

I disagree with the idea that these phrases should be avoided. Job postings often list them explicitly and automated resume scanners look for them. I whole heartedly agree that just using the phrases is not enough - perhaps use them as headers with a concise list of actual accomplishments listed as examples.

hmmmmm!
hmmmmm!

The very worst and not mentioned is "Saved the company $///'s" or "earned the company $////'s" or "$part of a team the saved company $////'s", with not much in the way of details as to who, how when and where. We would not be in recession and USA would lead the world if 1/10th of the dollar claims were true. Companies do want those that can save or earn the dollars, but now days it seems all have done that? So if you claim the $'s, then in language those hiring and HR, (as they screen first), explain how the $'s... Most would really look at such data, but since most claim such things, we might seriously consider adding it as "item 11" to the other 1o"?

RandomCrap
RandomCrap

I'm a manager who hires technical people all the time, so hear me when I say I skip right over these kinds of platitudes. I'd rather see concise highlights of a candidate's accomplishments and demonstration of skills, which I can translate to my own requirements. Also avoid saying things like "I was part of a team...". I want to know what you did for your team, not what your team did. If I see too much of that, and too few individual accomplishments, the resume goes to the bottom of the pile. Filling your resume with common every-day tasks like "I monitored the systems daily" or "I wrote weekly status reports" should also be avoided. Those statements don't demonstrate skills or accomplishments. If a resume is filled with this stuff, it goes to the bottom of the pile. Finally, realize that most managers will not spend more than a few minutes on a resume. It's not that we don't want to; it's that we often don't have time to. So make sure your major accomplishments stand out somewhere in the first or second page (preferably first). In fact, you might think about putting a dedicated "select accomplishments" or "career highlights" section on the first page, and avoid company/organizational acronyms or terms. I've been on both sides of this -- technical applicant and technical manager. Working as a manager with hiring & firing responsibilities for a couple years has been an eye-opener. When I went back to consulting/contracting, I completely re-worked my resume to make it easier for managers to find what they need to make an interview decision.

jquispe
jquispe

The subjectivity of these phrases should be accompanied by a specific event, a goal achieved or obstacles overcome. Of all the phrases I've used often is "result-oriented." Well, more than 10 years working in the area of Technical Support and 2 years at Project Management and the company ALWAYS want results!. I think each of us knows this phrase because it puts a greater or lesser extent. I think that the more of these phrases exist in the curriculum without adequate support, we will have less to say about our work experience.

robert.francis
robert.francis

I disagree with "Superior (or excellent) communication skills". More and more I see this as a requirement for companies in their job vacancies. Why not address it if they ask for it?

grant_s_scott
grant_s_scott

My question would be where do you think we got that language from. Here is a hint, this taken directly from Monster.com with no alteration: Results Oriented Collectors Needed!! Company: Ajilon Professional Staffing Job Category: Customer Support/Client Care Reference Code: US_EN_4_025194_00004476.9 Location: Overland Park, KS 66210 Job Status: Temporary/Contract/Project Job Description: Are you a results driven Collector with a passion for Customer Service? Do you want to work for an industry leader located right here in Johnson County? Are you looking for a team oriented company with a great Work-Life balance? If you are, Ajilon wants to talk to you! Ajilon Professional Staffing is currently looking for several dedicated collectors that are energetic and have a drive to succeed! Candidates will be responsible for processing outbound calls, collecting financial account information, following up on application information, updating internal database and working on special projects as assigned. This great opportunity is from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and offers a casual working environment and Benefits starting from Day 1!

info
info

...as Ms. Ryan puts it, the ?vocabulary challenged.? the word should vocabularily (adverb) Anybody getting the joke?...

JCitizen
JCitizen

My opinion is that if the candidate cannot use brevity in his/her resume; I don't need them anyway.

ramba
ramba

Great question! HR people are typically clueless on department level roles and responsibilities. They are risk averse and work primarily to reject resumes. Assume that the hiring manager wrote the job posting and selected phrases that HR can use in the filtering process. Using the exact phrases will get you through the automated filters that screen resumes.

santeewelding
santeewelding

To hear from one who hires as I hire. Mine are way more up close and personal, but you cut to the quick, too.

JCitizen
JCitizen

for easy reading and condensing it to one page can't be beat. I've never been refused for my resume. Once I was even considered for a job, despite having a serious physical handicap. British Petroleum put knowledge and organizational skills above eye candy any day!

Englebert
Englebert

The above is a phrase I truly despise. However, had quite a discussion with an HR Placement person who endorsed that phrase. Then continue to see career ads asking for that. Conclusion : use the phrase that the company requires. Not everything out there makes sense.

djed
djed

I used to get 100+ resumes to review for one job and have to pick 4 or 5 to interview. If every one of them had the same phrases with nothing to back it up, how would I decide which to pick? You've got to make it stand out one way or another to make the cut.

walter.kirsch
walter.kirsch

You're not only NOT off topic, but you cut through to the essence like a laser. No other responder came close to your clarity or cogency. I'm so old that I thought "WoW" meant "Walks on Water", a talent I sometimes claimed.

RandomCrap
RandomCrap

My wife, a director with the U.S. Dept of Labor, recently provided this advice to a friend who is applying for a government job: "One thing that is very important to know about applying for gov't positions is this: the people in HR will review the applications and develop a cert to give to the hiring official. These people don't really understand the work that needs to be done so they can't translate something you write into something comparable, (no matter how obvious it might be.) Whatever terminology they use in the announcement, use the same language in your narrative. If it says "Demonstrate how you communicate orally and in writing...", then say something like "in my previous position, I had numerous opportunities to communicate orally, in front of groups ranging in size from 1 to 50. I gave sales presentations to ......... " There will probably be a list of things that you are supposed to rate yourself on. These items are weighted differently if the hiring official has done his/her job. If they weight them all equally, they will not end up with the right candidates. Some people give themselves the highest marks on each category, but the HR staff will go through the applications and find examples of each to support their rankings. Don't sell yourself short in these categories, but make sure you have enough supporting evidence, especially for those that you anticipate would be critical to this position. The heavily weighted items should float to the top - those are the items where you want to hit the homerun. " That's good advice for a government job seeker, however I it's not necessarily good advice for someone seeking a job with good company that lets project/technical managers review resumes and make hiring decisions. If that advice leads you to write a resume filled with cliches, but lacking in accomplishments, your resume won't rise to the top.

hmmmmm!
hmmmmm!

Most agree the terms are over done.. but I have seem many resumes where they add a block of words at labeled in various ways as "For search engines" or some such thing. Points awarded for this bit of innovation. Showed a bit of creativity as well as some adult that understands how the systems and HR all to often work.

minstrelmike
minstrelmike

I agree that the ten are all insipid phrases. However, in this day and age (ha ha) resumes are read by computers and human relations specialists. Both groups respond best to common phrases. If I can write well, then I shouldn't have to tell you that on a resume; my writing will shine. However, shiny writing on a resume read by some drone in a cube will not make the cut. Eloquence obscures, whether it's done to a program with OCR or a human-reader with OCD. If a resume is just to get past the gate-keeper, use the simplest and most versatile key phrases.

greg.hruby
greg.hruby

as Ms. Ryan puts it, the ?vocabulary challenged.? the word should "BE" vocabularily (adverb) Anybody getting the joke?...

kevaburg
kevaburg

.........for someone offering career advice and quoting misused words or phrases, shouldn't she be looking closer to home before critising the habits of others?