Leadership

A cert to help with IT/business alignment?

QAI Global Institute of Orlando, Florida, is now offering a cert that can help IT pros bridge the IT/business gap.

Readers of this blog know that I often emphasize the need for IT pros to understand and be able to communicate with the business side in their companies. Many people have asked if there is a formal training mechanism to do this. Here is a cert that addresses this need. I'd like to hear from anyone who's taken the training and can talk about its efficacy. In the meantime, here are the details:

The Certified Associate Business Analyst (CABA) cert helps you bridge the knowledge gap between business and IT by using a Common Body of Knowledge. Having this cert on your resume shows that you have a professional level of competence in the principles and practices of the business analyst profession.

The CABA is a vendor-specific certification offered by QAI Global Institute of Orlando, FL. Here are the initial and ongoing requirements, according to gocertify.com.

Initial requirements:

You must hold a 3 or 4 year degree from an accredited college-level institution; hold a 2 year degree from an accredited college-level institution and have 1 year of experience in the information services field; OR have 3 years experience in the information services field.

You must then submit a Certification Candidacy Application and non-refundable application fee ($200). Finally, you must pass a two-part exam.

The exam has a 2 hour time limit. A passing score of 75% is required.

Continuing requirements:

You must recertify every three years by taking an exam ($200) or by submitting a Recertification Journal which contains at least 120 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits ($100).

Phone: 407-472-8100

Email: certify@softwarecertifications.com

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

18 comments
santeewelding
santeewelding

I'll certify you as qualified to get along with me.

spunkygermanicus
spunkygermanicus

Don't listen to the poster above, he's just trying to rip you off. I'll certify you for $75, and I'll even throw in a free copy Antivirus 2009.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Conspire in a little restraint of free trade. Get along with me or I eliminate you. In fact, I see you haven't paid...

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

I know now. Pay me well, or I blab.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Say nothing to Toni about this. She will blog and blab all over town about it.

santeewelding
santeewelding

You run the Eastern franchise; I, the West. We monopolize a floor at $99.95. Make a deal they can't refuse.

spunkygermanicus
spunkygermanicus

I think we should be able to find some synergies in our business paradigms.

ChicagoJCB
ChicagoJCB

Two things: 1. vendor-specific "certifications" are of very dubious worth. All they prove is that you know how to manipulate some tool 2. IT-business alignment will never happen at the business analyst level if management isn't doing it. And it WILL happen, regardless of the precise qualifications and certifications of the analysts, if management IS doing it.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

IT is quickly becoming a field where you will end up spending more on training and certifications than the meager salary is worth. Vendor-specific certs are the worst because there are no industry standards. Yes, there are standards, alot of standards, but too many standards is the same as having none.

noelynot
noelynot

Can you imagine if other industries required certifications like this? A mechanic that had to be certified for each different tool in his toolbox? I have seen employers who will turn down someone with a B.S. in Computer Science in favor of someone with an A+ certification. Madness it tell you.

yattwood
yattwood

I have to say I agree with the posters that express skepticism regarding 'certifications' - I am a terrible test-taker, but at 2 AM, when an critical production Oracle database is down, the DBA that can use a combination of experience and knowing how to find things on Metalink and/or the Net - that is the DBA that will be in most demand - not the one who is an Oracle Certified Professional and can barely start an Oracle database in SQL*Plus!

rackerman
rackerman

Pre-screens, pre-qualifications Ends up screening out 75% of the most qualified candidates. Just another way for these companies to make money, HR to justify their jobs with busy work, and for the actual hiring manager not to find the most qualified candidate.

rbmfernandez
rbmfernandez

how about pros who want to take the cert from other countries?..

robin
robin

I don't speak for but am a subject expert for IIBA's Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK) on which the CBAP is based. It's aimed at business analysts, a position whose placement organizations differ on. Some consider it part of the development side, some the business side, and some in the middle. My perception is that IT/business alignment is implied but not a focus of the CBAP. I also speak regularly at QAI conferences but am not actively involved with their various certifications. I do find it somewhat perplexing that the CABA certification's title refers to "Associate" Business Analyst and wonder how that seemingly lower level relates to just plain "Business Analyst." I suspect something may be missing from the description of the certification or its positioning within QAI's set of certifications. Strange...

yattwood
yattwood

I have been a PeopleSoft DBA since 1998, when I joined my current company - if you held a gun to my head, I would not have the FAINTEST idea of how to use PeopleSoft, from the front end, as an end-user - and this has caused me problems in translation - User: I'm having a problem with Journal Edit. DBA: Tell me which _tables_ and _SQL statements_ are part of Journal Edit. User: I don't know that. (At this point, I usually deal with the application development team, who, because they know the front-end as well as something about the database, can give me the information I need) Recently, an email was sent out from my company's HR department, offering web-based, basic training courses in PeopleSoft HR - I _jumped_ at the opportunity, and have signed up for all of the classes - I see this as a golden opportunity to actually UNDERSTAND what the database I know in terms of SQL Server tables and SQL means to the end-user helping someone figure out their payroll deductions.

Fregeus
Fregeus

At least, that's my point of view. This certification seems to be for people in business working in IT, while what we need is something for people in IT working with business. Not the same thing. TCB

faran
faran

Hi, I've been informed of the CBAP (Certified Business Analyst Professional) certification recently, which requires 5 years of work exp as a business analyst, but i've never heard of the CABA. After doing a little bit of research into it, I am not sure how it stacks up against the CBAP. How do you think it compares to the CBAP?

pivert
pivert

I find these certifications bs. Basic knowledge should be part of it-training. But when an user can't explain what he wants / needs or see the bigger picture: talk to someone else. It's a no-win situation where finally any project will fail because "a button is in the wrong place" or some similar reason. No, I don't expect people to be semi-IT or (worse) full-IT minded, but I'd like them to know what they do or how their job fits in the whole company-flow or eco-system. Should be quite basic but I find this missing most of the time. These certifications take IT back to the 70's where IT dictated how people should work ('press that button'). In the 90's it was the opposite ('make it so I don't have to press that button'). I hope that finally users will understand why they have to press that button and what's behind that action. Common sense I guess. Or not?

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