IT Employment

A surefire tip for making yourself memorable after an interview


Would you like to somehow ensure that job decision makers remember you after the interview is over? And by "remember," I don't mean because you came in wearing a jester's hat or hit on the receptionist. I mean that you stood out from the other candidates in a good way.

If you don't feel comfortable that your credentials alone will make you memorable, here's a tactic you can use: Come prepared with a story or two that illustrate points you want to make about your work history. For example, you can sit there and reel off a list of duties you were in charge of, but if you attach some kind of story, the interviewer will create a mental image of it, which will make you more memorable.

For example, you could simply state that in your past job, your role extended through troubleshooting, installing, upgrading, and 24-disaster recovery. Or you could relate a specific story about having to recover an important document for an end user who was sobbing beside you as you worked. Don't make stories up, of course, but try to find one that contains a visual element that will make an impression on the interviewer. That way, when he starts thinking about candidates after the interviews are over, you'll stand out in his mind.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

6 comments
mdhealy
mdhealy

A career counselor I once worked with at a time when it looked like I might soon be on the job market had me start the process by getting a notebook and over a few weeks filling it with "achievement stories" of things I had done that I was pleased to remember. Fortunately my situation improved shortly thereafter, but the experience of preparing for a possible layoff was quite useful because it caused me to think through some longer-term career development issues. We used this material in a number of ways. We sorted them into categories and drew on that to make a list of my strengths for the resume, which first allowed me to notice strengths I didn't realize I had, and second even for those strengths I already knew about it was very useful to have specific examples to put into the resume. We also selected some for possible inclusion in cover letters and mention at interviews. In addition, I have found the "achievement stories" approach to be an excellent way of preparing for my annual performance review.

catholicphil
catholicphil

Make sure that you are truthful, since the employer will sure check everything out. If you are untruthful of anything that is on your application, they will be sure to put you in the scrap barrel, or the file for fraud. Be as correct as possible. do not make any promises that you cannot keep. plus be a cooperative as you can with any kind of information he is requesting. There is usually some way he is trying to check you out for honesty.

philk10
philk10

surely any decent interviewer will be probing you for specifics on what you did rather than generalities, I know I did when I was interviewing ?

kraterz
kraterz

I was interviewing mechanical engineers for a position in my organization. There was this one guy who came with a folder of pictures and product blurbs of all the stuff he'd designed or help create. He also showed us a few videos on his laptop about his work and the stuff he'd designed in action. Of all the guys we interviewed, this really stood out from the rest.

robo_dev
robo_dev

An applicant for a DR manager position made up and delivered a little basket with fruits, candies, and toys with a card explaining how each item correlated with her expertise. Credibility and Respect score = 0 Remember-ability = 10

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Then hit up on the secretary.