IT Employment

Add a QR code to your resume to illustrate your strengths

An expert on online reputation management gives five reasons you should include a QR code in your resume.
James Alexander, Founder & CEO of Vizibility, says that adding a QR code to your resume is a tech-savvy way to illustrate your strengths. A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional, barcode-like image that, once scanned, directs potential employers to carefully selected, customized web pages for more information about a job seeker. (Figure A shows a QR code.)

Figure A

Those of us who don't want to be thought of as an object or commodity might get a little creeped out by this, but Alexander offers reasons you need a QR code on your resume:

  1. Get some attention: QR codes are used on all sorts of marketing materials, but they're still pretty rare on resumes. When you use a QR code, your resume stands out. It's also like Botox for your resume, branding older job seekers as tech-savvy.
  2. Don't land in the round file: A QR code can help you make sure prospective employers see relevant links about you when they conduct an online search...instead of an arrest record belonging to someone with the same or a similar name.
  3. Send a mobile-friendly message: Over half of online searches start from a mobile device these days. With the right service, you can set up a QR code that links to a mobile-friendly mini-site that showcases curated links and information. It will make a better impression than sending a user to a portfolio site that requires side-to-side scrolling.
  4. Check out who's interested: With an online identity management service, you can set up an alert system to receive a text or email when someone scans your QR code. You can also receive geographical information to identify where the scan originated to track interest in your resume.
  5. Keep your links up to date and/or change your focus: You control the URL to which your QR code directs users. You can change the links and information at your mobile mini-site to accommodate new information you want to share with prospective employers or to tailor your profile for specific job searches.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

22 comments
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brooks@intellinet-comptng
brooks@intellinet-comptng

For those who don't deal with QR codes as a general rule. How do you actually add the code? What generates it? I assume we need software or a service to do it. What information do you recommend be included or what can be included in the QR code?

MarkM_in_Atlanta
MarkM_in_Atlanta

Mistercrowley, this article/blog is clearly NOT a how-to. It is a why-to. The title should have tipped you off to that fact. Do not disparage the author for not including something that was beyond the scope of the subject. Toni Bowers also did not tell you how to use Microsoft Word and how to drop a QR code image into your r??sum??. You are credited with having the brains and resourcefulness for getting all of that yourself. Evidently, actually doing that is not one of your strengths.

paul.ob.tech
paul.ob.tech

Mistercrowley is evidentially not one of the tech savvy crowd the article mentioned.

Nick Corcodilos
Nick Corcodilos

SatelliteCISSP makes a very good point -- basically asking, what's the point of putting a QR code on a piece of paper that you're giving to someone who doesn't know you and that you don't know? Why would they scan it? A QR on back of your card is very different -- you actually handed that to someone who has met you, and may want to know more. It makes sense. But to rely on a QR code to introduce yourself is about as passive as relying on a resume to introduce yourself. The idea seems good at first glance, but consider the numbers. You're competing with millions of resumes. A QR doesn't improve your odds. On the other hand, meeting someone and handing them your card -- that changes everything. Then there's a reason to look you up.

DaveSlash
DaveSlash

I could be wrong here, but I don't think Toni is advocating putting ONLY a QR code on the resume ...with little or no other info. I think including the QR code along with all the normal information is a fantastic idea. I'm going to see what I can do with that tonight from home.

mistercrowley
mistercrowley

The article is titled, "Add a QR code to your resume to illustrate your strengths".... Evidently actually telling someone HOW to add a QR code to a resume is not one of Toni's strengths. Just talking about what can happen if you do add one or don't add one. This article is a major fail for me. I was hyped up to see examples and stuff; then, after I jumped... I came down on my face. Talk about one the lamest articles I have ever read in the history of my being able to read.

mbrello
mbrello

how do you create or obtain your own personal QR code?

IT_Stargazer
IT_Stargazer

As a hiring manager, if I received a resume with little or no info beyond a QR Code on it, that piece of paper would immediately end up in a trash can. This is as bad as jobseekers on Linked-in who ask a recruiter to "look at my profile & tell me if I'm qualified." If the job seeker can't bother to put any effort into their job search, would should the recruiter or hiring manager? Separately I just received a business card with a QR Code on the back, which I think is a sensible approach. Finally, I think this article would be more useful with some tips on placement of the QR Code, and maybe a link or two to a legitimate QR Code generator. This would help reduce the potential for abuse through redirects, etc.

tlosbo
tlosbo

My co-workers and I were recruiting at a University career fair when a candidate brought an introduction piece of paper with practically no information but a QR code linking to his/her resume. Having to take out your phone to scan and look at the resume was a bit awkward when everybody else just has a resume with the information readily available. The candidate did stand out, but it would have been best if the QR code was an addendum to more details not listed on his resume. A friend of mine has put a QR code on his business cards which works out very well.

Ascalonian
Ascalonian

My company actually just received a resume with the QR code. It was a link directly to his professional experience website. It provided code examples, his resume, some personal stuff (like favorite activities, etc), link to other social networks (LinkedIn, etc) and listed "on the side" projects he is working on. As you mentioned, HR or who ever would need to have something that scanned the QR code. However, under the code he also provided the link to his page. His resume will always stick out in my mind now.

irvan.hendrik
irvan.hendrik

QR code in resume?? sounds good, but what should be in the QR code? a link to a website? isn't it better to just create a link to the resume? instead of creating a QR code and ask the recuiter or HR, etc to scan using their mobile phone?

Skruis
Skruis

When my company was hiring, I had to review a lot of resumes and only 1 came with a QR code and though I ultimately passed on the candidate, I still remember that he was the only 1 out of a hundred or so with a code...now what was his name...doesn't matter, didn't hire him :-)

mbrello
mbrello

Brooks, check out the replies to my post earlier in this thread. Several people posted many helpful ideas/links.

SpamNone
SpamNone

as with anything else, what kind of impression you made... (????????????????????)

toni.bowers_b
toni.bowers_b

I kind of feel honored to be the author of one of the lamest articles you've read in your history of being able to read. What's that been, about a year?

mbrello
mbrello

Thanks to those of you who posted helpful information regarding the how-to. I learned something new! Yayyy me!! And, as a side note, Toni I appreciate your articles and I agree with MarkM_in_Atlanta, the article was a "why-to" not a "how-to." Obviously, all you had to do was ask, and people were happy to tell you "how-to." Why do people have to be so negative and mean (@mistercrowley)?

gevander
gevander

I found several online QR code creators by searching for "free QR code generator" on Google. Some of them will let you create but not download without paying, some are more flexible than others. Shop around, you'll find one you like.

taomaster99
taomaster99

Actually the article states to put in on your Resume as an addition not a replacement for.

fcphdJim
fcphdJim

There are several Firefox add-ons that work fine too. I can generate a QR code for any page I view by simply right-clicking and selecting QR Code from the contextual menu. No hassle, just save the image and it's good to go.

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