Enterprise Software

Are motivational tactics the same at any age?

I once worked at a company whose employee recognition program system was not unlike a kindergarten teacher's gold star system. The weird thing is, it worked.

This piece published previously in June 2007.

At a company I used to work for, the President and CEO was a highly respected entrepreneur who kept his leadership skills honed by attending seminars at Harvard's Business school every year. After the seminars, he would come back with new theories to try out on us. He was really earnest in his desire to better the company by helping its employees grow and succeed.

So he came back one year with an idea for employee motivation. He bought these wooden plaques with plush velvet centers for each one of us. Then he announced that each quarter he would be rewarding gold pins to deserving employees for different categories, such as Team Work, Innovation, etc.

This became quite the unspoken competition among some employees. You'd go into someone's office and see their plaque hanging there with more medals than General MacArthur had. At some point, it dawned on me that this reward system was not unlike a kindergarten teacher's gold star system. And that's kind of appalling at first blush.

Was the workforce of this company being manipulated by a strategy gleaned from a child-care book? If I hadn't seen that it worked really well, I would have been insulted. I took a look at my own management style. I didn't think my direct reports had the mentality of toddlers, but I did feel some parent/child dynamics. For one, I was unconditionally supportive of my team and they knew it. And there were times I actually had to step in and help make peace between employees like a parent would with her children. But these were not conscious acts of manipulation. It was a natural part of my managerial role.

I also made sure that I listened to everything my team had to say. The late, great Texas governor Ann Richards once said that the most important thing she learned from raising her four children was to never let anyone leave the table feeling they hadn't been heard. Makes sense to me.

So I have to ask -- in your opinion, what other elements of personnel management closely resemble advice in child care books? And is the similarity creepy and insulting, or is it just a fact that human nature doesn't change regardless of the age range?

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

62 comments
jkameleon
jkameleon

I'm most motivated when nobody tries to motivate the grumpy old me.

jck
jck

I work my best when people give me a job to do with clearly defined goals and a reasonable timeline. At my last job, the manager was always 2 hours "how's it going?" or "is that done yet?" whether it was a addition/change or a whole new module. The job I'm at now, my boss is cool. In fact, he thinks i get done fast. So, I like it here. lol

TonytheTiger
TonytheTiger

[i]I work my best when people give me a job to do with clearly defined goals and a reasonable timeline.[/i] Go away and leave me alone until it's done! :) [i]At my last job, the manager was always 2 hours "how's it going?" or "is that done yet?" whether it was a addition/change or a whole new module.[/i] I'd tell him, "You know, if you'd just go into your office, put your feet up on your desk and relax, I'll make you look good."

jck
jck

He was a control freak, know it all, and a workaholic. He basically lived the life of putting raising the kids on his wife, and all he did was study MS tech and preach MS ideology like it had no flaw. Of course, I tried to tell him and one of the company owners that Silverlight wouldn't do what they wanted and that programming custom controls would take as long as developing a website with ASP. Took them 6 weeks to decide that, then they pushed me hard to "just roll it out". Anyways, I now work in almost 100% Microsoft-free development environment. I maintain a legacy Access DB application that I will be converting to web-based JS/Java servlet driven platform. But, micro-management usually fails. Get competent people, give them reasonably scheduled work, and let them go for it. Otherwise, you end up with IT people like me who are considering leaving the industry for reasons such as...beancounters usually have more say-so nowadays in determining project cost and/or timeline rather than customer need.

Xanneros
Xanneros

At our company, a small call center that handles warranty claims for different businesses, the call floor reps are motivated by "sn bucks". If they work extra hours or do exceptionally well on a call they get sn bucks which can be saved and redeemed for time off, extra breaks, or other things. It seems to work for them. Of course in IT we are motivated by an occasional party with alcohol and rock band, lol.

crivart
crivart

It's probably the given "mistake" of naturally agreeing that Childrens and Adults are two different worlds with completely different laws, rules, and everything. And of course, as adults, we think we are playing in the Advanced Mode. The social experiences I have so far, and also second-handed ones allow me to suppose that it isn't so much. In fact, one could naturally trace a lot of similarities between child and adult behavior, with subtle diferences in the complexity and variety of the expresion; you can find equal (and even equally riddiculous) rivalities, desire of affection, approval, etc. Any parent could give a try and trace the analogies, there; thus, you can supose that, small differences given and taken, the stimulation techniques you can use on one, you can adapt or translate to the other, and it will work, most of the time. How was that about "growing is unnavoidable, maturing is optional"?

tioedong
tioedong

motivational tactics are the same, but the way you do things are different. But then I'm a cynic. The government was always giving out rewards, and as a maverick I never got one. But I cherish the one given by the community when I left, because I know it was real, not manipulative.

Inkling
Inkling

Motivation is achieved by: - Leading by example. - Setting your subordinates up to succeed. Giving them the tools (training, etc.) and the freedom to do so, etc. - Being supportive of your subordinates in professional and personal matters. The rest is just fluff and trickery and ultimately, in my opinion, tools of inadequate leaders or leaders whom are not supported in a similar manner as mentioned above. Maybe that's overly simplistic, but if it works in the Marine Corps, where lives depend on it, it should work anywhere.

JamesRL
JamesRL

The leadership you describe should work in most situations, in business world or military. But the business world is different. There is not the same camaraderie in business. You don't live together. Your lives don't depend on each other. And most people in business are not bound by contract or oath. If they don't like it, they can leave at any time. I think motivation, like management in general, should be approached in a flexible manner. I have 10 staff. They are motivated by differnt things - some are late in their career, some early. My senior staff have loads of autonomy. They know that if they make good decisions with a sound basis I will back them up. Their level of autonomy is in their job description. They tell me what training they need to get the job done, they find it and I pay for it. My company by the way, will knock down my bonus if each of my staff has not completed 40 hours of training(formal or informal) a year. My role is to challenge them, guide them, push them. For some of them, having some interesting projects to work on is their motivator. Some I am given and have to delegate out, some they come up with on their own. I had to use different motivators when I had a group of young desktop support staff. Horses for courses as they say. James

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

I hope you have been in the marines to be making comments like that. I have been in the military for 14 years (Air Force and Air Guard) and putting people in for awards and decorations has always been stressed. They are a public demonstration of appreciation and I have not seen a general without a full ribbon rack. I have a great deal of respect for all the military leadership that I have worked with I haven't met any leader that doesn't stress the importance of recognizing their people. Bill

Inkling
Inkling

The United States Marine Corps in which I served. Regardless of the branch of service though, the basics remain the same. Marines also encourage putting people in for awards, when it is rightly deserved. I was a Sergeant (e-5) when I was honorably discharged from the Marine Corps. I had several 19 & 20-year-old Corporals and Sergeants working for me. I would take those 19 & 20-year-old NCOs as managers ANY day over probably 85% of the "managers" I have had in the civilian world. Why? Because Marines are taught that the only thing more important than mission accomplishment is the welfare of your Marines (subordinates). I have had ZERO managers in the civilian world that lead by example in a similar manner as the Marine Corps taught me on a daily basis (by instruction from my superiors and by my superiors living by those ideals). On two separate occasions I watched my officers receive awards based on work that I had done. I was as proud when they received the awards as I ever was when I personally received awards.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

Having served as an enlisted grunt and then as an officer, I agree that your people are your first and primary concern. You lead from the front. You never ask anyone to do something you wouldn't do yourself. If you don't know, you ask. When you ask for advice, listen to it. Beating people over the head isn't leadership, it's assault. Only dictators use fear and intimidation to get ahead in life.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

and as we all know there ARE NO EX-MARINES. LOL. Great folks, all of you. I wish I had been able to join the military, but I am partially deaf, and was exclueded for that reason when I tried to enlist. But enough about me... Thank you for your service. It is appreciated. I have tons of respect for our military, and especially the USMC!

Trekrod
Trekrod

Darkness is Nothing Nothing is Light therefore Darkness is Light A simple exercise in perception. It is clear that the Fish Story as well as many other OE (Organizational Effectiveness) programs do offer an opportunity for someone to shift their perception of a situation. Turn the event or mood to your advantage. Cognitive Therapy offers the same perception shift. If you are doing something that affects you in a negative way, affect the change in yourself to improve your attitude, motivation, mood or work environment. Once you give control of your emotional well being to another person or group you have abdicated control over yourself. This is a fundimental rule of Cognitive Therapy. That being said, In the Corporate world you have two forces working against each other no matter what company you work for. In an established company you have upper level managers working to conserve capital and go through the budget process. But at end of budget year lower level people are told to spend spend spend so that upper managers won't lose the budget dollars the next year. Shouldn't the whole team be motivated in same direction? In a small Start Up company everyone knows capital is key, so conserve and make do, but deliver the reliable working / finished product on time at the least expense. If monies are left over then use them to grow the business the next year/reward the staff with bonuses/ provide them with training. Cultivate the garden so to speak.

GSG
GSG

Stick that pin somewhere! Anyone uses that method on me and I'm likely to take one of those pins and stick it where the sun doesn't shine. If a place is a good place to work and I'm challenged, and they realize what I give to the organization, I don't need this touchy feely motivation crap. That demotivates me. If you need this, then I feel sorry that you are so needy that you need to be validated by a childish gold star.

Menopausal
Menopausal

Tactics you'll never see in a child care book: -Annual reviews that focus on 1% imperfection -A policy of rewarding the child care teacher for withholding rewards from children (ie the manager gets a bonus for cost-containment that is achieved by reducing raises to employees) -Severely punishing children who get injured and ask for bandaids (ever have a worker's comp claim?) -Screaming at children who ask the teacher to stop another child from biting/hitting (ever work with a bully?) Anyone who proposed those methods of "managing" children would be laughed at or arrested, yet that's exactly how the average factory worker is treated. And we can't understand why we have a shortage of welders or other skilled trades!?! I work in IT, my husband works in manufacturing, and it's unbelievable the things he's witnessed at work. I think most of his co-workers would say they would LOVE to have managers who got their methods from a child care center's TEACHER, instead of the playground bully.

Justin James
Justin James

It is so sadly true, and it is not just manufacturing! A while back, during my initial training for a job, someone was complaining about something or other, and the manager said, "you should be grateful to even have a job, you know what the job market is like right now." This was back in early 2003, when the local job scene was brutally bad (as an example, taking that job was a pay *cut* from unemployment!). That set the stage for many such events (mind you, this was a F500 company). Workers, especially here in the Southeast, are all too often treated like machine parts, not people. I know of companies that have unofficial policies like, "if you fall off a ladder, you are fired before you hit the ground, since failing to follow safety procedures is a fireable offense." I too wish my kindergarten teacher (or better yet, Fred Rogers) was managing these places instead of the people they had in there! J.Ja

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

I was in the same boat in 2003... The job I ended up with paid about 2/3 what I was getting from unemployment, and that was WITH working 50hrs/week. I was an assistant manager at a convenience store... doing the occasional piecemeal on the side.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

... and as to that convenience store I worked at... 4 out of 5 of the managers were IT folks. A good deal many folks ended up changing careers for good. The only positive to come from it is that the industry purged itself of the folks who were only in it for the cash.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I think sometimes its harder for managers to get jobs. If you apply for a non management job, they won't consider you - over qualified, or too long out of the technical space. And not as many management jobs become available - most companies prefer to hire from within. I was this close to taking a $99 course to get my forklift license. My community had lots of warehouses and there were always jobs at about $12-$15 an hour - better than unemployment insurance. Someone at my wifes church offered to train me to be a truck driver. I ended up with some IT contracting jobs before it came to that, but it was close. James

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

-When the child scores 100% on a test, ask him why he didn't earn extra credit. -When the child earns extra credit and scores over 100, ask him how he's going to improve for the next test. -When the child completes his homework early, assign more homework. -Base his grades on the performance of his classmates -make him sit at his desk without crayons, pencils,pens or paper (once sat in a conference room for a month without any equipment whatsoever) -punish/sabatoge students in other teachers' classes for outperforming your students -transfer students who do too well to other schools -transfer students who do too poorly to another class where that teacher's students are outperforming yours.

Justin James
Justin James

I worked at one place that used this "Fish Philosophy" system. Call me crazy, but just because some fish mongers had a really great time with their job, and would throw the fish around before wrapping them up, does not mean that I can apply it to my job. Basically, the whole thing was about how to have "fun" while I am at work. None of it was really applicable to my job, or most people's jobs. We do not have the luxery of laughing, singing, and tossing PCs throughout our day. IT work typically requires long stretches of concentration, and this system (suitable for a 5 year old) was completely contrary to that. J.Ja

poppawookie
poppawookie

I recently had the Fish philosophy introduced to me at our organization. I left the meeting with a "Get real" chuckle in my head. Those of us who have IT jobs know that there is little to no "fun" at work. Programming equipment does not allow for one to be so merry and light-minded. There is a time and a place for everything, including fun, at work. In IT; however, those fun times are few and far between.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

...and we do great work. It's all about attitude.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I work in IT. I have fun at work. Don't presume to speak for me or my organization. I don't work in the front lines of customer service, but my staff interact with them. We participate in their fun days. We joke with them, play cards with them, share our birthday cakes etc. I have a person or two in my team who doesn't participate, their choice and I don't force anyone. But sharing a light moment now and then sure helps things go easier when things get bad, and thats one of the points. James

cupcake
cupcake

I agree with JamesRL... I have always been able to say that I don't "work" for a living, I get to play with computers and someone pays me to do it (and pays me very well, thank you). I think it always starts with whether or not you love what you do. If you wake up thinking 'I HAVE to go to work' instead of 'I GET to got to work', maybe you should seriously consider finding another career choice. Its amazing how quickly one bad or negative attitude can quickly wipe out the positive...

JamesRL
JamesRL

The idea behind Fish (and its been 7 years since I've seen it), is not that you need to be able to toss fish or PCs around. It is that we as individuals can choose our attitudes. You can choose to come in the morning and be miserable, or you can choose to try to smile and work through the issues. And that a positive attitude can have an impact on those around you. The big impact is customers. If you display a positive attitude with your customers, their attitude will improve. This really pays off on something like help desk operations. I still think Fish was a good thing, though like anything, you have to learn to apply it to your own situation. James

Justin James
Justin James

James - I am pretty sure that was the point too, but the message came along fairly mangled in the class we had. All they did was focus on those fish mongers having a great time, and be like, "see how happy they are with a nasty, smelly, hard job? All you have to do is make work into a game!" I do agree that it is possible to enjoy any job, by choosing your attitude. I know, I've made some of the best or easiest jobs miserable with a bad attitude, and some of the worst, hardest jobs great with a good attitude. But the way the materials we were presented with, and the way they were presented, were just obnoxious. J.Ja

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

The focus was that you have power over your own attitude and life. It's sad that such a good story was ruined in it's presentation.

JamesRL
JamesRL

And then we had a group discussion around what we all thought it meant. I had a brand new supervisor working for me who saw it and the lights snapped on. He got it, and he applied it. James

hfeddema
hfeddema

If we could choose our attitudes, there would be no market for Xanax. In fact, people only have limited control over their moods. So long as you can do your work, it really doesn't matter if you are cheerful or serious or even depressed. Management insistence on cheerfulness is very offensive to me, as it assumes that only one personality type/mood is acceptable.

TonytheTiger
TonytheTiger

the reason for the chemical imbalances are the result of pressure from trying to fit into what somebody else (or society) expects. Sometimes this imbalance is a direct result of the stress, and in others it is because the person is using medicine to try to change themselves because they've been convinced they're 'not normal'. Part of me is sad over it, part is just angry at the seemingly sinister forces behind it and those who take advantage of it. Hopefully, there's a pill out there that can 'cure' me ... and make me into the good little robot I'm supposed to be :(

cupcake
cupcake

Without this sounding too sappy, I applaud the turnaround in your life. Sometimes when you're way down, its hard to see the light but you did it! Too bad more people cannot feel that way!

pmiller
pmiller

It is very simple to chose your attitude, I had a situation just a few months ago where, I realized I had a bad attitude and made a positive decision to change that? On Monday mooring after a great weekend I was feeling a little tired and run down from lack of sleep, when a co worker asked me how my weekend was. I explained all of the things I was doing, but in a negative way, based on my current feelings of tiredness. My co worker looked at me and said STOP, im not going to give you any pity because you had a great weekend, look at it from a positive light. There is no reason to be so negative about it just because you didn?t sleep. After pondering this for a moment I realized he was right. I had a great weekend and regardless of the way I currently felt I should be happy, because the past few days had been great. I then decided that I was no longer going to seek pity, the mental decision changed me. I was then walking a little taller I had a smile on my face and my joy was contagious to everyone I interacted with the rest of that week. I hate to think of how my attitude bled off when I was thinking so negatively? Just goes to show you that the way you think can have a dramatic effect on the way you, and others feel!

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

I should have taken what you listed as the facts - hey these things happen. Thought the joke would have been picked up but then there is never a guarantee with that with the forum system. Anyway - Sorry if you became distressed in any way. PS - Nice T Shirt - where did you get it?

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

I know that I am a rarity, but every one of them is true, though many are related affects or part of the gestalt of some of my conditions. Since I've come to the realization that you were only kidding, I would like to apologize. I am sorry I overreacted. I do have a bunch of conditions, I deal. The paranoia is real, as I think I may just have inadvertantly demonstrated. Again, I am sorry,

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

I was sure one off them must have been thrown in for a dramatic effect - perhaps not then. So you actually have been diagnosed with all those?

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

1)Don't pull on a dog's ears 2)When the nice man offers you candy, DON'T GET IN THE VAN 3)When you pull the pin, the grenade is no longer your friend. 4)Don't kick over beehives. 5)Don't make puns over 'getting' someone who has just stated they suffer from clinical paranoia.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

if you take it in its full context in the pointed out thread. Literally - well I was talking to sugar, or so the words say. Is your name suagar?

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

You posted. In that case I'm coming to get you.... You hear me Sugar? Posted: 06/25/2007 @ 09:00 AM (PDT) TheTechMail 5 Job Role: IT Department Manager Location: Scotland, GB Member since: 06/15/2006 This was a direct threat to my person. http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-6230-0.html?forumID=102&threadID=227283&messageID=2264825 You have no cause for action, while I clearly do. If 'coming to get' someone isn't a threat, then what, pray-tell is? Now, kindly grow up (and a pair, while you're at it.) You posted a direct threat to my personal safety. Such threats will not be tolerated.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

Therefore I will hold you on notice also. Similar warnings regarding your post contents are pointed back in your direction. As your posts are longer and contain more accusations I may have a better case if needed. I remember HAL 9000 trying to get me deported (LOL) - thing is deportation was impossible as I was not an illegal immigrant in AU. He got confused between Deportation and Extradition in a 40 post war! Then there was WMW? - for constant racial abuse all he got was a closure of account. He was back under a new name a week later. I looked at my posts and see nothing that anybody would worry about! Hook & Line! You call me many names in your posts and throw accusations - I have not engaged in any such activity's within my own!

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

As you continue to display the emotional maturity of a three year old, I'll try to put this in terms you can understand. Unless your last name is Gates or Balmer, you have no cause to defend anything. What you are doing is not noble, it is not self-defense and it is nothing more complicated than a child throwing a tantrum over the fact that someone else did not like his favorite toy. The fact that you are having such an extreme reaction to a passing swipe at an operating system demonstrates quite clearly that you do not have the maturity to play with others. Since you seem to completely fail to grasp the concept of self-defense, I shall educate you on what self-defense is, and what self-defense is not. What self-defense is: 1) An appropriate response to agression with a comperable level of force. 2) An act of force to an unsolicited act of agression. 3) An act designed to mittigate harm to oneself. What self-defense is NOT. 1)A tantrum (such as you are having) 2)Stalking (which you seem to be engaging in) 3)Threats (which you have engaged in, and which have not gone unnoticed) 4)A response to an attack on another. I hope this clears things up for you. Now, if you care to behave like an adult, as opposed to a spoiled child, we can be done with this exchange. Finally, you sir, are on notice: Any additional threats to me, such as on the dyslexia discussion, will be taken up with the staff of Tech Republic, your IP and the appropriate authorities. By the way, the above is an example of MY engaging in self-defense.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

as you seem to be making comments about a person as well! The "he did it first" game is commonly known as the legal term "Self-defence".

Wayne M.
Wayne M.

Management is responsible for creating the work environment, but the staff is responsible for their responses to it. I will do the best I can to get the tools, resources, and rational decisions needed by my team, but I am not a miracle worker. Sometimes bad decisions happen and I can only ask my staff to deal with them. My approach is usually to invoke the "24 hour" rule. Everyone has 1 day to gripe and complain about a decision, but after that, we get back to work and get the job done, no matter how many restrictions are thrown at us. It is the responsibility of each team member to put his opinions aside and accept the reality of the situation. I do not expect people to be emotionless, especially about things that they care about. I do expect, however, for people to put things behind them and give their all to support their team and not be an eternal black cloud.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

you're engaging in malicious behavior, have been called on it and are now trying to backpedal. Please don't insult anyone's intelligence with the "he did it first" game. First off, most school-age children have learned that it is not a valid form of arguementation. Second, I made a flippant comment about an OS, you are making comments about a person. If you can not understand the difference, you need to get out more. As I said previously, my problems can, and have been corrected through medical intervention. Until there is a cure for being a jerk, there is no hope for you. Lastly, there is a very real difference between razzing an OS and engaging in schadenfreude.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

There are wonderful medications and treatment that help autistic individuals, such as myself, become highly productive in our society. Sadly, for people like you, there is no hope. Modern science has yet to come up with a cure for being a jerk. If they ever do, I suggest you present yourself for the first treatment, so that you can get the help you so desperately need.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

Where did you go for this medical help?

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

and a mountain of debt and legal bills piling up on top of it. My ex also took/sold/destroyed irreplacable family heirlooms, including the only things I had left from my mother and grandfather, some irreplacable handwritten manuscripts of my music. Oh, did I mention I hadn't been able to find a job in IT for four years by that point? Now, should I focus on that, or on all the blessings in my life? You ***can*** choose what you focus on. If I dwelled on that mess, I would never have gotten back into the IT field, met my wife, gotten married, or had a baby on the way. You ALWAYS have a choice. AND if there is something medically/chemically wrong, you can choose to get medical treatment for it.

Justin James
Justin James

I like to think that the majority of people with bad attitudes have a legitimate reason behind it, and are not just perpetually cranky. Indeed, I also like to think that most people with *reason* to have a bad attitude, do not have one. :) J.Ja

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

I think there is a difference between having a crappy day, and being a perpetual black raincloud. Most of us are overworked and underpaid (and of those who aren't, many of them probably think they are as well). We can either choose to mope, whine, complain, and otherwise make sure everyone around us knows how miserable we are (and is as miserable as we are), or we can - as the FISH folk - find a way to make the situation fun (or at least tolerable).

frank.schafer
frank.schafer

At night, after a rain when the clouds have gone, you can fall down and lay in the mud, or fly up (driven by the after-rain-inverse-gravity) and reach the stars. We should realize that without grief wouldn't be happiness exactly like without dark wouldn't be light. There definitively ARE situations if one is in a bad mood. It is modern to dispose ourselves laughing and smiling bu sometimes it is impossible to hide the inside behind the mask. We aren't commercial dolls, we are real humans. Imagine: Your girl-friend in love has put your suitcases in front of the door just the day after you have finished the reconstruction of the flat because she realised just THIS day that you don't fit together. You won't look at the stars in such a moment because you are lying in the mud because you feel like a thrown away used paper handkerchief.

Justin James
Justin James

I am in agreement that each infdividual is responsible for their own attitude. Of course, some people do indeed have provable, chemical imbalances which chemistry may be able to help, but the number of people with actual diseases is much lower than the number of people being treated as such. Nevertheless, it is the employer or manager's responsibility to respond to an employee's attitude. If an employee has a lousy attitude that affects their performance, then corrective actions need to be taken. That is the manager's or employer's responsibility. The employee's responsibility is their own attitude. In other words, reward those with good attitudes, and provide correction or discipline for bad attitudes. The problem with motivational initiatives in general, is that if someone chooses to have a bad attitude, no amount of iniatives will help. And if the employee chooses to have a good attitude, they do not need these programs anyways. For example, I once knew a guy who used to always compalin that he was the "lowest paid developer in Manhattan." Never mind the fact that he strolled in at 10:30 AM, took a 90 - 120 minute luch, and left before 5 PM. He would say he did that because his pay was so low, but the way I see it, he would never get a raise with that kind of attitude. No amount of feel good initiative could help him. Now that being said, most of the time, someone with a bad attitude has a good reason behind it, whether it be low pay, poor working hours, too high stress, or not meeting their career goals. Unfortunately, all of these are things that most employees will not discuss with management, for good reason. A company that is squeezing their people to cut costs, or is simply not growing enough to provide career growth opportunities for all of those deserving, simply is no place where saying anything will be able to change much. J.Ja

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

The market for Xanax may be there because people look for something without which can be found within. We have the choice to count our blessings or count our troubles. Do one and you'll be content, the other and you'll be miserable. At night, after a rain when the clouds have gone, you can look down and see the mud, or look up and see the stars. which you focus on is your choice.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

It's great. Managers are at ease, therefore we are at ease.

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