IT Employment optimize

Average Tech Manager makes $105,000


At least that's what the latest salary survey from InformationWeek bears out. They say,"The typical U.S. business technology manager now makes $105,000 in salary and cash bonuses, the first time this professional has joined the six-figure club in the 10 years InformationWeek has done a salary survey."

They caution, however, that this change comes amidst a time of slow IT job growth. This may mean that existing IT managers are getting paid more but have less staff. This is further borne out by the fact that there's been a drop in salary level for the 25 and under age group, so those people aren't coming into IT at the rate they used to.

For a look at the results of the salary survey, click here.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

14 comments
beberle1
beberle1

Depends upon the industry they're supporting. An IT manager in a non-IT business is seen as the necessary evil/capital drain and rewarded accordingly. However, in an ISP or software firm, they get the respect, responsibility, and reward of a 'producer'.

ndamatrix
ndamatrix

That is oh so low for anyone working in a metro and/or city region.

LandLocked
LandLocked

I make 109 in salt lake city with a BS managing 4 employees, I would expect that salary?s are higher on ether coast.

mandrake64
mandrake64

Sounds about right for a "real" manager rather than simply a team leader. There must be some compensation for taking a larger responsibility. In Australia, the IT salaries have generally softened in recent years but there are still some great opportunities if you search well and are prepared to be more mobile. And we are still talking AUD$110,000-130,000 AUD by comparison (AUD$1 bought USD$0.88 as of today). This could also be representative of resources being more scarce. Australians are tending to head overseas for the bigger bucks rather than stay at home as they wish to retain at least some of their leisure time. No sense in earning a packet if you have no time to spend it.

PMO Weasel
PMO Weasel

As others have mentioned, this figure may be unrealistic for many roles and companies, but not so for others. My organization has an "IT Department" of roughly 50,000 people worldwide. There are many many Managers making less than this figure, but also many Senior Managers, Directors etc. making much more. It only takes a few Regional CIO's bringing in the mega salaries to move the needle on this particular metris.

savantmgr
savantmgr

I'm not sure that information is absolute. Let's get some others commenting about this! Maybe in India or Japan...possibly in Hong Kong? I have been working as a contractor for the past 2 years, managing one project after another, and the folks that I work with are barely making $75k (when they get bonuses). Maybe if your with SAIC (just ask Sec. Gates) or with the fortune 100 and above, but not for the typical IT manager on the east coast. Everywhere I go anymore all I see is IT people from outside the US, and we know that most are making under $52k, just ask them. I talked with someone in Panama working for Sprint, just recently. The truth is somewhere in between if an IT manager position is even up for grabs. I'll have to get a DBA (and I have 3 degrees - one in Project Management)even to see those figures. I also have over 25 years experience. Let me hear more about this $105k??????????????? Joe

fourcadm
fourcadm

Salaries, Reviews, Job Offers, Articles, and Company Information - Thousands of data associated with real positions in industry, services, and many more fields. Boost your career with WhatSalary.com

jimw
jimw

Here is a snapshot of Australian conditions which are similar to the US. Between 1981 and 2004 I was never unemployed. After that, I could not get a contract at the enterprise level. It would be easy to blame ageism and all that for my situation (which I redressed by returning to the small business market, by the way). After some thought, I concluded that there were two substantive reasons. The first was commoditization of the marketplace, where everyone wants someone who used a particular product yesterday. As a generalist who had looked after one system for 9 years, that put me on the back foot for a start. The second was something called the 457 visa, which allowed overseas practitioners to come into Australia ostensibly for training and experience, though I suspect the real driver was their low salaries. There are well-documented stories of agencies splitting the difference with the client. I suggest that there are still high-paying analytic and managerial posts, but they are mainly with companies whose platforms require skills and experience which are immediate (as I said) and cannot be easily satisfied from overseas. Elsewhere, the influx of overseas practitioners has certainly created a static marketplace, though I doubt that salaries have actually gone down.

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

Does this IT Manager need an assistant? I am for hire. :) Seriously, with all the legal/illegal H1B's out there, I am surprised that IT salaries are not 80% below 60k and then 20% 200k+. This is the effect of skewing salaries by introducing legal slave labor from 3rd world countries, or countries that simply get away with treating their people like so much cattle.

dagar
dagar

I am working for a small-med (under 500 employee) company in a midwest city of under 100K people. I am the IT Director, what am I saying, I am the IT department. I have seen this # and thought woohoo, I will make sure to show the vp about that! Now back to reality. I think that judging IT pay is hard since it matters so much on area, company size and position. And different people look at the position thing different, just look at the many different job definitions on salary.com. I take on the role of system admin, network engineer, programmer, project management, ... Now I do plan on constantly improving myself by studying and taking classes and going for certs and maybe some day a masters degree. I know that I will never see that figure of 105k here in the next 10 years.

johnson-clayton
johnson-clayton

Dagar, I am like you. I live in a metro area of the midwest (no chicogo but the Quad Cities). This salary range that is mensioned would be a VP of IT not just a manager. I have worked for companies that I lead an IT department of three other individuals and still was lucky to break the 60K/yr mark. But like I told a recuiter yesterday I don't go to work for a company just because of the pay, to me pay is just part of the "total" compensation package. Is the company a leader or striving to be a leader in their area of expertese? How do they treat their employee's? Is there a big turn around? How are the medical/dental/vision benefits? How do they feel about vacation and family leave time? These are all important to me, I've worked for companies that were only willing to pay me 35K a year but gave 2 weeks vacation after 90 days, provided real good medical benefits after 30 days with the company.

Ivy Clark
Ivy Clark

Definitely over-inflated figure!!!

Stevo1974
Stevo1974

I agree with the theme that these figures are more CIO CTO figures. Living in the southwest U.S. where all salaries run lower than on either coast, I still will clear over 75K this year, and I'm only a Manager, at least in Title. However, in my compnay there is no CIO or CTO and I perform the direction, vision, planning, budgeting, and approval roles. Of course, I also change toner cartridges, clear printer paper james and help the CEO email pictures of his grandkids. Like someone mentioned before, I don't judge the job based on the pay it offers. There are so many intangibles that need to be considered. How do they feel about te3chnical training? Are you offered the oppurtunity to attend IT specific events locally or not? Do you have oppurtunities to network with peers? I'd like to bring one area up that no one has addressed yet. Respect. True, most IT Professionals are the ones people run to when something goes wrong, whether its in thier field or not. I am no different. When a server needs to be builts or something has crashed, I am made to feel like the most important person around. When things are running smoothly, which is 99% of the time, I'm looked down upon as useless cargo, IT fodder of the modern business world. This situation makes it more difficult to justify a higher salary to them: if you're good at what you do, there are no crises and you're viewed as useless; if you're saving the day everyday, it quickly gets old and then you're viewed as as substandard for not having diagnosed the problem sooner. Of course, I would rather err on the side of caution and provide stability in lieu of the visability I might have otherwise. Still, I plan on bringing this survey (which is from 2003?!?) to my bosses attention. I see it as justification of my salary this year, and a quiet plea for an above avaerage increase next year.

Bruno Fonseca
Bruno Fonseca

I think that this figure is defenitly overinflated. This sounds like a very executive position salary, or maybe one that is only given in the top tiers of corporate america companies. If I were to take this to my bosses they would mot likely laugh at me. My salary is defenitly not this much, but I always say that money is not everything, it helps, but not everything. You could get paid a lot, but if you are not evolving or improving what is the point. The only real numbers we will ever see is if someone does a survey where they get a copy of the W2 for each person doing the survey so they don't overinflate their numbers.