IT Employment

Avoid self-inflicted job hunting woes

Career blogger Toni Bowers offers a couple of job-hunting behaviors you can avoid in order to keep your spirits up.

Anyone who has been unemployed for a while knows that it can be a struggle just to keep your spirits up. There is little you can do about the dismal employment rate or the people you're competing with, but there are a couple of behaviors you can change to keep despair at bay.

Set your goals lower

Don't set your goals too high. Although you want to get yourself motivated in a big way, it's a mistake to tell yourself that you have to land a job by a certain date. There are too many external factors over which you have no control -- what you can control is your own behavior, so set your goals with that in mind. Tell yourself that you will send out X amount of resumes this week, or you will contact five people in your network.

Those are manageable tasks and, by completing them, you will give yourself a little boost by checking one more thing off your list.

Don't apply for every job

You may think that applying for a hundred jobs will increase the odds of you getting one of them, but that's not true, especially if you're applying for jobs that you're only remotely qualified for. In this case, the quantity of applications will only increase the quantity of rejections you get. And, let's face it, being rejected by a company you were only "settling for" will make you feel worse.

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About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

42 comments
enduremasaraure
enduremasaraure

i think a follow up will ease your woes than pinning your hopes on something that never materialize.the given tips are great!!!

ProfT
ProfT

Here is one idea that really needs to be considered. The candidate identifies salary history. Wow, he was making $65 an hour. So maybe that takes him out of the running. But after some research you realize the candidate was a temp at PeoplePowerPlacement. His contract lasted 3 months. But the candidate looks at what he made those three months and times it to come up with a 12 salary. In all honestly he really made 29 an hour and the rest was a "per diem" as he had to be out of state, live in a motel, and eat out. The problem is two headed - the potential employer looks at the 65 an hour and thinks they can not afford this employee. The candidate inflates the real salary by posting what was paid to him. A realistic view of salary is important.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

What I got paid when, where and for what is my business. You get offered waht you are worth to the potential employer. What you were worth to some other geezer is irrelevant. The only reason apotential employer wants to know what you are / were last on, is to avoid wasting time with a stupid offer and to pay what you'll take as opposed to what you are worth. Tell 'em nowt.

highlander718
highlander718

it also has a weird logic to it: "the quantity of applications will only increase the quantity of rejections you get" (duh?) right, of course, but it will also increase the quantity of iterviews you are called to, don't you think ?

mpayne31
mpayne31

I suffered to layoffs in the past 4 years; each job lasted 2 years. The first one left me unemployed for 3 months; the second for 6 weeks. Both times, it was social networking (and having a good skills, a good resume and practicede interview skills) that got me the job. The second time I socialized a lot more; I believe that's what did the trick. Don't underestimate the value of letting people know your situation but keep it upbeat!

wiscogirl
wiscogirl

Don't forget to keep a good, easily accessible database of every resume you've sent out listing when it was sent, where, the specific job and referencing the exact resume version and cover letter. This is especially important when you're sending out a lot each week. If you do get a call back, you'll need to be able to quickly find the information on the specific job and what you sent them. This helps you look focused (nothing worse than having to ask someone what job they're calling about). Keep the information updated to show where you've been contacted back by the prospective employer, and also to track what heppened. In addition to tracking the employer, be sure to enter every follow-up phone call & email you've had. At the end of a job search (hopefully a good end)a database like this is good record of what you went through.

saqman2060
saqman2060

Good tip. Lets face it, you most likely not going to get the perfect job your want. When you don't, you need to stay positive. Failure in these touch times it too promising and that will add a boost to anxiety. However, because we know that hardly we will get the perfect job, and the longer it takes to find work the more hard things will get, why not apply to a good number of jobs? Competition is high, and you will have to do extra to quote "Sell yourself". You can apply to the jobs you know you are qualified for, lessening to the amount of resumes to send. Remember you are competing against others who maybe more qualified than you applying for job below their qualifications. It would be safe to apply to any job you are qualified for that offers room for growth.

Professor8
Professor8

"Open your net" but "don't apply for every job" for which you are capable and enthusiastic? To excell you should "Work with Passion", "Find Your Calling", "Target the Top", "Climb Your Own Ladder", "Do What You Love", "Get What You Really Want", "Create the Work You Love", and "Earn What You Deserve"... but now we're not supposed to aim high, not do good work, not produce great products? Time for the Stossel line: Give Me a BREAK!

imshah82
imshah82

I agree with you and ofcourse it is the fact that consecutive rejection may lead to the unexpected disappointment that spoil once .... and impact on very badly.

pasivemanagement
pasivemanagement

It is true. I agree with all above. Janis P.S Despite of my personal mistakes done in my job search.

billad
billad

I was out of work for almost 5 months. I've never been without work for more than 30 days, and this experience almost floored me. But I kept on, each day I got up, showered, dressed for work, and went into my home office to "work". My job? Browsing the web for jobs, networking with former colleagues and associates, and responding to requests for more information from recruiters. I don't know that I agree with this author's choice of terms when she says "set your goals lower". I understand what she is saying, and agree that one should never set a firm timeline for when you will have a job. That only leads to disappointment. But one should never deliberately lower their expectations for a good position that they are qualified for. I encountered many "recruiters" who used this economy as an opportunity to lower rates. Jobs that used to pay $50 an hour on the low end are now being offered for $25 or $30 an hour, and jobs generally paying $70 per hour are offered for $45 an hour. I refused some of these positions, knowing that I would have to explain why I dropped my salary from $145,000 per year to $80,000 or $90,000. These things WILL come back to haunt you. In the same way, one must be very cautious in the type of position you go after. A manager will be curious as to why you moved from a management position to a hands-on technical position. With the hundreds of resumes on their desk, they likely won't take the time to research the answer to that question. If you must take a position to pay the bills, then by all means do so, but be prepared not to list that on your resume, and continue your targeted search while working. When asked about my current situation, I told interviewers that I had taken some private contracts, but was waiting for the right position. This told them that I felt that THEIR position was the right one, and they took me more seriously. This also told them that I wouldn't accept just anything, but was keeping my career path in mind. Above all, do not give up. Keep trying, even when you receive rejections (or no response at all). The right position is out there, the market is turning upwards, and you will find the right job. I did, and for all of the angst I went through for the past few months, I am a stronger person for it.

Rastor9
Rastor9

Getting, dressed for work, and calling your job search your job! Something else not to forget is your family! Take a break, go to the beach for the weekend, or just drive into town for a family dinner. Finish those "honey do" projects between your telephone calls and job interviews! You won't believe what a sense of accomplishment will bring to your continued "unemployment" just by starting and completing the "little" things. Plus, you might get that 60 hour per week job at 150K per year and then you won't have time again for the "little" things.

dba88
dba88

I think you might want to write a couple more articles: 1. On nasty practices by recruiting firms and recruiters in general. For example; posting URGENT on every job requirement when it's not, resume collectors, not returning calls, and I think you know what some of the others are. 2. On the continued torture and displacement of Americans looking for IT positions that have been replaced by H1B and L1 visa holders. 3. The number of recruiting firms out there today! How many are American firms, how many are Indian firms, etc., and... how do you know which ones to trust and which ones are for real!! These are a few of the things people want to know. No more soul soothing! I know people that have simply stopped looking and a couple that have lost their homes!! Without getting into a "globalization" discussion, why is offshoring still being allowed in this economic climate?! Don't mean to be cynical, but there really isn't a whole heck of a lot to be grateful for this holiday season from an employment perspective is there??

gksmith2002
gksmith2002

Especially if you have been out of work for a while ? Don?t just be looking for a job. This is the time to fill your time with something productive. This is a chance to volunteer or update certifications. These are positive things to tell an interviewer instead of just ?job searching.? Do not isolate yourself. Step away from the computer and network and get help to practice interviewing. It is better to blow a practice interview and learn from it then blow a real interview. Get with people who are not afraid to hurt your feelings to help interview and review your resume. Someone telling you ?that was good? is not helpful. Telling you ?you need to sit up straighter or change this in your resume because it sounds better? is productive feedback.

Data Nut
Data Nut

Getting constructive feedback is so important. I don't know how many times I'd ask someone to critique my resume, only to be told it 'looks great!'. So for those out there being asked for feedback, truly give some. If you have a friend/colleague who is trying to find employment this is not the time to worry about hurting someone's feeling by giving a true critique. Sure, you don't want to hit them over the head with it, but don't gloss it over either. Soften it with reminding them about what they are good at if you need to. Job hunting is something that most do infrequently, so most everyone will need help polishing their image and resume. The stakes are way too high for the job hunter to be making nice nice and avoiding any white elephants in the room. Best of luck to everyone looking.

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

Good advice from several posts here. One of the things that has worked very well for me is concentrating on jobs that are a good fit, both from a skill set and mind set level. If you are changing jobs and have the option, stretch yourself a little, go for a better job, but be willing to take lower pay (not necessarily from what you are currently making, but at the low end of the job's stated compensation range), this will let you compete more strongly for the job and show what you are worth when in the position. You then have a chance to move up in salary and responsibility once you are in. Sometimes you find when you get that job, your salary or increased responsibility doesn't go up as fast as you expected, but because you have taken a higher level position from your previous one, probably with more responsibility or challenges, you will be able to put that on your resume when you are looking for a new job. Also, I spend a lot of time researching and making sure when I apply for a job that both the employer and I will be happy, so I do less 'shotgunning' and more 'sniping' for the right job...I don't send out hundreds of resumes, consequently, my success rate has been very high. After 35 years in business, of the jobs I've actually applied for there were only two I didn't get. I found later that one of those (a tech position in a school district) had already decided who they were going to hire, they just had to go through the motions of a public offering. In the other case, the better candidate got the job.

carl.stovall
carl.stovall

Be mindful in prayer for those that are seeking a job. Stress kills!

glenstorm_98
glenstorm_98

That's the least of our responsibilities to each other, and something anyone can do!

glenstorm_98
glenstorm_98

Don't fall into the trap of feeling like you're unemployable, or that no one wants what you have to offer. I've been in the searching-for-work game many times (having been a consultant for nearly 30 years), and believe me, it's a temptation to feel that way, but totally untrue and self-defeating. Just persevere! It may take time, but you *will* find something if you keep at it.

kjohnson
kjohnson

Can you explain why applying for a larger number of jobs does not increase your prospect of getting one? Employers receive huge numbers of applications, thanks to the way jobs are advertised and applied for on the Net. This means that it's impossible to read all the applications, and therefore the chance of success is about the same as if the employer chose an applicant at random. In such circumstances, sending more applications increases your chance of getting a job. I happen to think this is a mistake: applicants should be encouraged not to apply for jobs they don't want, and benefits should not be made contingent upon sending applications, but rather applicants who do not want a job should be quietly allowed not to have one.

Tony DeRosa
Tony DeRosa

As the market is right now it is likely you will have to accept some rejection in your job search along the way and you have to understand your situation and deal with it. Just sending out resumes over and over again is unproductive, so keep evolving yourself and your resumes to improve your chances. As you refine your presentation, you should increase your responses and be able to focus on positions that YOU really want and really want YOU. Learn from the rejections and improve yourself to offset the disappointment you will most certainly have to endure at some point. If the rejection depresses you, increase your dosage of Xanax, but don't stop looking.

rdubrey
rdubrey

I think you have to apply for a million jobs so you can hopefully luck through the stack at one or the two of the places. Sticking out in an INBOX is tough and so is somehow making your resume stand out among 200 others sitting in a pile on someone's desk.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Twice I ended up looking for work during what were called "high unemployment" periods in the U.S. Each time I essentially swamped the market in my local area, the state where I choose to live. (I have no intentions of having to move out of this state.) Did I get a lot of rejections. You bet. So what? It just made me work at it harder. Quite literally, I sent out many hundreds of resumes. The first batch sent out was 300, and there were several batches after that. I didn't limit myself to just those who were advertising that a suitable job was available. If I thought a company or other organization even MIGHT employ someone of my skills and experience, they got a resume. And I used a pretty broad definition as to what sort of job I might be hunting for. I'd read a job description and if I thought I might remotely qualify, I applied. Granted that it looked as if it were the sort of job that'd pay enough for me to take it. I even looked through job postings with position titles that I didn't know what they meant. To see if the job listed looked as if it were something I could do. I've been, and done a lot of things. The thing is, that besides piles and piles of rejections, I got interested responses. Requests for more info, and interviews. Both times I went through this, I ended up with a good job and in both cases it was a case of my taking a "shot in the dark", so to speak. The job advertisements being vague as to the precise nature of the job, some of the "required" quals being far beyond what I truly had, the companies concerned did not give their names, and the job titles were somewhat obfuscated. Chuckle, but I figured the worst they could do was say "No." And couldn't possibly ever say "yes" unless I contacted them. I've gone through the same sort of thing on behalf of a couple friends, massive "licking and sticking" campaigns, get em in the snail mail and sent off. Worked for them, too. My opinion, one should not be afraid or shy of trying for this, that, or the other job. Even if you think your quals aren't up to what they're asking for. Let's face it, a lot of those posting jobs available are wording things such that it seems they're looking for rocket scientists who can also walk on water if need be. But if you can get into the position of actually talking to someone who knows what the job REALLY is, often enough you find that they've inflated and exaggerated things more than a little and that its something you really can handle and qualify for. I remember one in particular. The listed "minimum requirements" looked daunting. Advanced this and advanced that. Then I got in to speak to the guy I'd be working for if I got the job and found out that "advanced" to them, was quite ordinary and basic to me. The guy went to giving me a little technical quiz they'd generated in-house. I took it. He looked it over and said I was wrong on a couple answers. I replied, "How so?" We discussed them, during which time I proved to him that HIS people were wrong. They were looking for text book answers. Which was okay if one lives in a text book or academic world. The real answers, solutions, for the real world were quite different and those were what I gave. Yeah, I did get a job there. Supervising those folks who generated that quiz. The truth was, I'd forgotten more than they knew about those particular subjects. In another case, the second time I did the mass effort, I landed a job where I wasn't as qualified as they'd hoped. However, of the responses they got I was the best of the lot. Got the job. Spent months burning the midnight oil to play "catch up", but I managed it.

NJnewsource.com
NJnewsource.com

I agree with the mass mailing technique, but you must also keep your focus. First target the ads that are close to your skill set. Then set aside time everyday to post resumes to companies who use people with your skills, even if they don't have a job opening posted. Often at large corporations, jobs are posted internally first. Then HR reviews the outside resumes that are on file. I have done this and gotten interviews. Also, go on every interview you get, whether you think you want to work for that company or not. You never know what you will learn in an interview that will give you an edge for the job you really want.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

I'd agree that FIRST you target those ads that are close to your skill set. But then I'd go after anything you MIGHT qualify for, even if it looks like a long shot. Given, you have some related knowledge and experience that'd give you some reason for thinking you MIGHT qualify and be able to do the job, even if its a long shot. As I alluded to before, I've seen a lot of fancy titles and job descriptions, with "walks on water, and is brighter than Einstein" type qualifications listed. Where I managed to get an interview just to find out that: (1) Their idea of "brilliant, omniscient guru" of whatever ... was pretty average in my world. (2) They were shooting to hire a God that was the answer to all their possible current and future wants, needs and dreams ... but none of the Gods were answering their ads. Just ordinary mortals like myself. (3) They copied the quals out of some textbook or list, didn't really understand what all those terms meant, or whether or not all of them needed to be met EXACTLY in order for a person to be able to actually do the job in question successfully. One of the jobs I landed was an example of #3 above (for at least part of the job description). The prospective employer had an idea of what they needed done, and an idea of the type skillset required. But none of the folks writing or approving the ad had ever had personal experience in that sort of work. I think they copied stuff from some book or professional magazine article someone read, or wrote down some things from some seminar attended. In any event, their knowledge of the particular skillset in question was cursory and superficial ... at best. To add to the confusion, their ad used terminology that was different from what I used and had learned ... about the very same subjects. But I discovered none of this until I actually got into an interview with a live person who was familiar with the job and what they hoped the applicant could accomplish for them. i.e. The interviewer asked about my knowledge of X subject. I had to ask him to translate the technical term into ordinary English. Whereupon I discovered he meant something I knew and called by an entirely different terminology. Set of terminologies, actually. Chuckle, I think they'd gotten their ideas and terminology from a PhD dissertation written by someone. Someone who had set out to prove beyond any shadow of doubt that he could indeed Pile it Higher and Deeper than anyone else. In any event, it turned out that my knowledge of the subject was indeed adequate to the task. More than, actually. What they wanted was, for me, pretty basic stuff in that area of knowledge. Also, you are quite correct about the idea that many jobs are never actually posted publicly. Or at least, not publicly posted until AFTER they're posted in-house for some period of time. The company for whom I now work NEVER publicly posts job openings until after they've: (1) Checked to see if there are any in-house people who might want the job and who have the qualifications. (2) Check to see if any of their in-house people KNOW someone, personally, outside the company who might qualify and be interested, who they'd recommend. Most, probably 95% or so, of open positions are filled by one of those 2 methods. Then they start checking resumes they have on file before actually publicly advertising the opening. And, yep, go to every interview. You just never know until yah get there what you might find. After all, you can also say "No, no thank you. I'll keep looking."

jacy
jacy

It is this kind of real life testimonial of what really worked, that is the most helpful for those of us who are highly qualified & experienced who are having trouble landing a good position in these lean times. Thanks so much for taking the time to share your experiences from the trenches.

mark9009
mark9009

Research more about the job requirements and customize your resume. Look at other people's bios or resumes and pick up some pointers. Research prospective employers. Check their websites and check out their management team. Work on your appearance, as it is easy to fall into a comfortable mess. Study up on sample interview questions and practice your responses. Record and playback to see how you come across. Would you hire you? Turn off the TV - timewaster!

rush2112
rush2112

You are your own worst critic. The repetetive rejections of "settled jobs" instead of desired jobs. This is a good idea which most people will never follow though it would be the best medicine ever for those who do follow this tip. I leave you with this. go find Les Brown and watch his motivational videos. He has a few quotes which will help motivate the most obstinate procrastinators. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbD02DlUapg You can't get out live ALIVE.

craigbe
craigbe

As someone who interviews IT ppl I would suggest NOT making things 'anyone' could learn (ie certifications, school, training seminars, etc) as your major advantage. If anyone can go to school/courses/classes to learn something then that is not a strong point. Most want someone who can integrate well with the current culture, are flexible, aren't afraid of change, aren't afraid to deal with people who ARE afraid of change, LIKE TO HELP, aren't of the mentality 'are they going to give me more money if they ask me to do xyz??' or 'it's not in my job description', can show initiative while NOT stomping on their supervisors/managers toes or making them look bad, don't show some sort of ambition that they want to sabotage their boss and take their job, are able to perform the basic job functions that were in the advertisement well (not 'I did it once'), etc. I could go on but you get the idea. The technical aspects of what you're good at get you in the door, but it's your personality and how you will deal with people that gets the job. Hope this helps.

craigbe
craigbe

Do you mean physically as in the layout, or the content? I usually don't care about the layout. If I have 50 resumes that all have the same basic skills then I give the cover letter more weight in some cases. I also don't spend a ton of time on education if there are no specific skill sets given. For that (if you don't do it already) I would give a small bullet list at the end of your resume saying what skills you are bringing to the table. That way the person reading your resume doesn't have to search for the info (and they spend more time on your resume). Also, in the cover letter NEVER say something like "I believe I'm a good candidate for the position" (or one of the billion variations). That is very presumptuous. Instead, write about any projects you recently worked on and what skills you used and what the end result was or what the project was for, etc. Not a huge diatribe but something like 'created a database to track pdf documents to assist in making our department paperless', you get the idea. :)

Ron K.
Ron K.

Do you choose people to interview based upon what their resume looks like?

TexasJetter
TexasJetter

Sometimes it is a slap in the face to see just how you come across to other people. Just knowing how to present yourself can go a long way.

arthurborges
arthurborges

Cheap shot at boosting Alexa hits for this most reputable and valuable website.

jamey123
jamey123

This site keeps getting more and more silly.

Jessie
Jessie

Let's NOT go to Camelot. It's a silly place.

JonathanPDX
JonathanPDX

Like she said, "Set your goals lower". Those are two very good tips to start. Why overwhelm people with myriad tips, cliches and nauseating "self-help" anecdotes? By keeping things simple, job seekers can reduce perhaps a little of the stresses that plague them.

cyberdocks
cyberdocks

I try to tell these same things to most upcoming job employees. There is nothing wrong with starting small and being functionally employed to start with. sardius from smsdam

Rastor9
Rastor9

In my 27 years of technology employment, I have never gotten the job I have/had by way of Bulk Resume mailings, web site applications, or even walk in applications. Every job I started came from knowing or being told about a job by someone I knew. Keeping in touch with workers in many fields, keeping track of contacts from conferences, seminars and even regional meetings has led to more and better employment than all the other positions combined. Sure some of these positions were posted, or online or also listed through employment agencies but I didn't find them, or apply for them through those resources. Many times WHO you know gets the job, or at least the knowledge of a job opening.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

As I mentioned in another post, I have most certainly gone the mass mailing of resumes route. And it has worked very well for me. However, when job hunting, I did not limit myself solely to that tactic. Each time I've been in job hunting mode, I approached job hunting as if that task itself was a job. A sales job. As a sales job, the first thing I wanted to do was to start collecting leads. But, of course, simple leads alone are not adequate. To make a sale, one then needs to start sifting through the leads looking for those leads that are both interested and qualified. Then one focuses upon those. In this case, "qualified" meant that (1) the place actually had an open position or was considering making such, (2) it was a job I believed I could adequately handle ... didn't matter if THEY thought I could as that was a whole separate discussion, (3) it was a type of job I was interested in or at least might be, and (4) the organization was one I might want to work for. But to get down to finding those leads that were both qualified and interested, I needed leads. And I sought and collected those by any and all possible means. That meant everything from the equivalent of cold calling, to door knocking, to whatever. I most certainly used networking. Not only talking to friends, relatives, and work associates. But also, when making my rounds to go to interviews, besides simply going to an interview, I'd also keep an eye out looking for likely places. A likely place might be one that had a "Hiring" sign stuck on the front door or on a sign out front. Or it might simply be a building for a company or organization I'd not sent a resume to but which looked like the sort of company or organization which MIGHT employ someone with my skill and experience set. Hey, I was out and about anyway going to an interview or whatever. Might as well drop in, say "Hello" and check the place out. My attitude was, "Yah never know unless yah check it out." From my point of view, at worse it just meant one more place to remove from my list of "possibles". But it might mean one more addition to my list of "work on them". Anyway, whether at a place for a scheduled interview, or at one of those places I'd just "dropped in" at. I made attempts to contact and engage in friendly conversation with employees in my line of profession, or a similar one. Not only would I inquire about how this place might be to work for and whether or not the might have a current or near future opening, I'd ask if they knew of any other place looking to hire someone of my type. The fact is, on a number of occasions I got good, solid leads on someplace else from someone in a place that'd just told me, "No, we don't need anyone right now." or "No, you're not what we're looking for." And I'd follow up on such leads. Sounds like a lot of work, right? Well it was. I didn't just do mass mailings and such, I tracked everything. Had a regular file system going. List of places I'd sent resumes to or had gone to and filled out applications. List of places to contact one way or another. List of places that'd actually responded one way or another. Separated into various categories. i.e. "Dead File", "Take immediate action." (such as answer requests for further info), interview scheduled, interview held and waiting for answer, etc. If I got a call, email, or letter from anyone, took me just a second to retrieve a record of every contact I'd had with them, the results if any, who they were, type job applied for, contact persons if any, copy of the specific resume sent to that place (I used a number of variations, depending on the specific job I was applying for and the type of business or organization I was applying to). And any pertinent notes. The dead file contained the records not only of the places that's firmly rejected me, it contained records for places I'd decided I definitely did not wish to work for, for whatever reason. I might move a record to a dead file because the pay offer sucked big time (i.e. was utterly ridiculous). Or I'd decided the position, after acquiring more info about it, wasn't of interest to me. Or, in some cases I decided I'd didn't like the organization or the people within it (in which case, it didn't matter how much money they were offering). Low pay offering did not automatically earn a place in the dead file. Depended on how interesting to me the actual work was and whether or not the quoted pay rate was just a "starter" rate with higher, more reasonable rates possible later. The more interesting, to me personally, the job was the more likely I was to accept a lower pay scale than my ideal. I have quit higher paying jobs in order to accept ones that paid less but interested me more. In any event, while I have never personally gotten a lead to a job I actually accepted via networking (well, not since many years ago), I have gotten jobs for friends and relatives in such fashion. And networking has gotten me many offers. I have a number of offers right now, gained through networking. But I'm not much of a job hopper. Like my current job and my bosses. Some of those offers include a significant pay raise promise. BUT ... I don't know that I'd like working for those folks. Do know I like the current bosses I work for and the work climate here. An offer of more money, alone, isn't enough to cause me to jump ship, so to speak. WHO you know can definitely make a difference. For instance, I got this current job by following up on a blind ad, where the job description was also somewhat vague but broad in nature. Very much so. Looked like they were looking for a "guru of everything". Turns out that the company running the ad does not like to reveal their name in conjunction with a job opening ad. When I asked, I was told it was because their name was good, and if used in such ads, they got overwhelmed with applications from everyone and their brother. Qualified or not. Thus the blind ad, placed through a head hunting agency. Head hunter not even allowed to mention their name until after it'd been established that I met minimum quals and other items of interest to the company. This done by head hunter doing initial interview and screening. If I passed that my records were sent to the company. IF they were interested, they gave head hunter permission to tell me who they were and to schedule a meeting/interview with someone in the company. As a further effort to avoid masses of applications, they deliberately listed "can walk on water" types of wanted qualifications. Not expecting that anyone actually HAD all those qualifications. Just to scare away the masses of obviously under qualified. Besides, as explained to me by the COO of the company, who'd crafted that ad, they were looking for someone who had as one of his/her traits, a willingness to tackle challenges and some things in the job being offered that might be totally new to them. And yah had to be willing to tackle a job that had aspects to it about which you knew little or nothing, but were willing to learn quickly on your own time. Because, in fact, no one ... actually looking for work in the specific field they had an opening for ... was likely to have all the listed quals. They didn't expect such. Only expected to find someone who had a significant number of the listed quals and who could display a past history of tackling NEW successfully. Anyway, I was an exception. Normally the vast majority of their new hires come about as a result of networking. Job openings are first filled from in-house whenever possible. Then, they ask current employees to recommend someone they personally know who might be a suitable candidate for the position. Their thinking is that current employees know the company work climate and what the general expectations are for all employees. Plus it is likely that they know other folks in their profession/specialty who are actually, really good at what they do. Which is pretty much true. For instance, in my specialty, I pretty much know, at least by name and reputation, most of the REAL players in my geographical area (the whole state, plus bordering areas). Those I don't know, I probably know someone who knows them. I also know a lot of folks in my specialty who can write a really outstanding resume. Can make themselves look as if they can walk on water. All without telling any outright lies. But who, in truth, are not nearly so good or capable as it might seem. In fact, some of them I wouldn't hire on a bet. Wouldn't recommend them to my worst enemy. i.e. One fellow I know. Bright ... possibly brilliant. Far smarter than I am. And his academic knowledge of our specialty is far greater than mine. And you'd have to kill a forest of trees to print all his diplomas and certificates. But no common horse sense and a major disconnect between what he knows and his ability to APPLY that knowledge to real world, workable solutions. I've worked with the fellow. For a short time, about a year. I like him personally. But he's pretty useless as a productive worker. I also do occasional, part time work as an instructor. Got this fellow a position at the place where I teach. And told him that he should pursue that as his main focus for his career. He's a decent teacher, knows more than his peer instructors. He's just not very good at applying his knowledge to real world situations. What's the old saying? "Those who CAN ... do. Those who CAN'T ... should teach. Those who can't do or teach ... pursue politics."

almondragon
almondragon

This might sound like a difficult recommendation, but you still have a network of friends and coworkers to attend Keep on working, if you are good on another language make translations, if you are good repairing PC?S repair them, if you are good capturing data make yourself available even for 2 or 3 days jobs. Don?t stop working never, if you are afraid of getting fired start searching for odd jobs, you will accomplish 2 things: you will keep yourself occupied and get some money which it will make you feel better.

cutting
cutting

I went from full time to 1 day a week. I was then terminated because the company was not able to keep me on. I have several "on call" jobs that mix with unemployment. It gets me out of the house and I feel better doing something. Do not call yourself anything resembling a contractor or you could loose unemployment (California) and have to pay back what you were paid. Just do jobs as you are called. Be sure to declare what you earned to the Employment Development Department (California) as they have long arms and ears and will eventually find out - even cash payments! If the temporary employer declares you on their taxes - and you did not declare it to EDD it is not a good thing.

gksmith2002
gksmith2002

Now for some positive reinforcement. I wish I could take credit for this list but I have to give credit to Doug Anderson in the Dallas Texas area. He is a Life/Executive Coach working with people in their job search. Chris Anderson: ?The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More Stephen Covey: ?The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People? Thomas Friedman: ?The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century? Malcolm Gladwell: ?Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking? Malcolm Gladwell: ?The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference? Stephen James Joyce: ?Teaching the Anthill to Fetch: Developing Collaborative Intelligence @ Work Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman: ?When Generations Collide: Who They Are, Why They Clash, How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work Daniel Pink: ?Free Agent Nation The Future of Working for Yourself? Daniel Pink: ?A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future? Faith Popcorn: ?Clicking: 17 Trends that Drive Your Business ? and Your Life? Doug Anderson wrote his own book: ?Life Redirection Handbook.? You can find Doug on LinkedIn.