IT Employment optimize

Beware of fake job postings

Poor economic times and high unemployment rates are enough to worry about, but the reality is there are people out there taking advantage of those seeking jobs. Here's what to look for and how to protect yourself against job ad scams.

Poor economic times and high unemployment rates are enough to worry about, but the reality is there are people out there taking advantage of those seeking jobs. Here's what to look for and how to protect yourself against job ad scams.

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I never thought I would encounter a situation in which I would compare ordinary spammers favorably to someone else, but here goes. A piece I read in The Wall Street Journal today warns job hunters about employment ads that end up being nothing more than come-ons from career-marketing services that charge up to $10,000.

Basically, here's what these scum factories do: They post an employment ad, you send in your resume, and they call you up to make an appointment for an interview. When you get there, they say, "Well, we're actually a career service. We aren't looking to fill that non-existent position we put in the paper, but we can train you to apply for ones like that." Of course, you're free to walk out at that point without giving them a red cent, and I beg you to do so, but even then you have wasted valuable time even meeting with them. You've also been unnecessarily encouraged by getting an "interview" and then let down hard.

At least your average spammer has the common decency to promise stuff that's so outrageous any normal person can avoid it. In other words, if you respond to an ad for a cream that will either increase or decrease the size of some body part, you're not going to get much sympathy from me.

But this job scam seems to go beyond "Buyer Beware." It's preying on the vulnerable people who make up that double-digit unemployment rate and who are desperate to continue to pay their mortgages and keep food on the table. And the career services market is not the only villain. According to The Wall Street Journal, "it might be a plan by identity thieves to get you to share sensitive personal information via phishing expeditions. Some of the job postings -- sometimes for positions long filled -- also could be from recruiting agencies looking to collect résumés."

So how can you tell the difference between a real job ad and these scumbag tactics? The article says: "One sign is that it lacks details about the hiring company and position. Such an ad might describe an employer as a 'major technology firm' rather than cite annual sales or say what kind of technology it produces. It also might offer a vague job description or list a salary range spanning more than $50,000. Genuine ads typically target applicants who have a specific amount of experience and pay salaries commensurate with their backgrounds."

If you're unsure whether an ad is sincere, the article recommends you take these steps:

  • Provide a resume with a post-office box address instead of your home address.
  • List just your initials in the document and not your full name.
  • Consider using a disposable e-mail address to prevent spam from clogging up the one you normally use.
  • If a business address or company name is provided, and it's a name you don't recognize, search for the employer's Web site to learn more about it.
  • Check for any complaints filed against it with the Better Business Bureau.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

55 comments
jamesa3131
jamesa3131

Just recently registered my details with Teleport my job. Although i did't include my resume i am never the less concerned after reading some of the reports regarding this company or (scam). I am mainly worried that not only they are out to rip people off but they may also be stealing peoples identies. Is this a real possibility.

jacksonkingfish
jacksonkingfish

While living San Diego 4 yrs ago, I would send out 10 or so resumes a week. Within a few days I would have a tidal wave of telemarketing calls, junk mail, and spam. Took me a few weeks to realize these were'nt job offers, they were a way to amass info to sell to the slime ball companies. With your resume they can surmise your earning power, if you live in an upscale area, as well as having your phone number and email address. Thank God for the "No Call" list released shortly after this. I felt it hideous to prey on vulnerable folks with this scam. I am much wiser now.

wiscoro
wiscoro

Just saw another scam here in an area with 12% unemployment - firm was supposedly coming to area and creating 2500 jobs. You went to their web page to apply and they requested $24 via Paypal to pay for a background check. The guy behind it pocketed $2400 before being arrested by local sheriff.

christopher.ramey
christopher.ramey

It's amazing how many "jobs" are listed under hotjobs, monster, etc. that have NOTHING to do with what area you are searching for. And I don't know how many times companies have been so impressed with my resume, they want me to work for them from home and make millions!!!

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

If you suspect the interview may be bogus, go prepared. Have a generic 'Risk Assessment Report' and an invoice drawn up denoting the two-hour minimum for your consulting fees. When the interviewer tells you it isn't really an interview, hand them your invoice. When you're asked what it's for, say: this risk assessment I just conducted for you. Make sure they take possession of the report. The assessment should say something along the lines that posting fake jobs opens the door for possible litigation which could lead to a class action lawsuit. Make a recommendation or two, and say you're giving the interviewer Net 15 terms. These bozos want to dance, make sure it's a mosh pit, and not a tango!

shasca
shasca

I still like the new "Mystery Shopper" Ad I saw on TR for the first time today!!!!!

wlportwashington
wlportwashington

Toni: I was out of work for a while and looked at the posting on line from the so called "Job Boards." Most of the ads were from agencies and not employers. My experience has been that NONE of the jobs ever existed. They were out to collect resumes for whatever reason. Could it be for marketing or demographic research in how many people are looking for work? With a lot of the ads, the expectations were that you had to be a rocket scientist as a bare minimum. Fortunitally I never did get much Spam. And then I used a disposable email account and still have a few just in case. The spam that I did get were from slimmers looking for money. I just forwarded them to the authorities and deleted them. In case they had a virus, I used a low end PC just for web surfing that I didn't care if I had to wipe out the drive. There should be more legislation to prevent these fake job postings and the ISP's throughout the country should block list these people.

brettwilliams101
brettwilliams101

I was called for an interview two days ago. When I arrived at their office suite, I was surprised to find it was a computer training school. They offered to help me earn my CCNA and MCSE in 8 months - all for only $26,000. By the time I finish my bachelor's program, I will have spent the same amount of money. He actually put down Purdue University - said that employers don't care about a degree and they just want to see certifications. WOW.

quentinjayford
quentinjayford

I will tell you what I think - they suck! Imagine getting prepared for an interview, taking the train into the city, waiting at the front desk, and then being told that this is a service! They couch this a coaching that will get you a job in any arena - touching, but should one really spend $4K and up on coaching? Virtually every job you will get will come from a reference that you know. Period. J

reisen55
reisen55

The interview that isn't: I have found many companies just go shotgun hunting to see what kind of talent is out there. Maybe old Bill down in IT is in a rough patch sooooooooo let's post an advertisement and have some quiet interviews so we can see about replacing him if we have to. Thus the advertisement is real, the company legit but they have no real intent of "hiring" and often don't because then the emotional decision of having to replace old Bill and lose all of that knowledge has (unless Bangalore steps in) comes into play. Nah, why can him. Endless rationalizations follow and old Bill keeps his job never knowing his head was on the block. The unknown death interview: EVER interview GREAT for a job, it's yours, you know it and can feel it and SUDDENLY WHAMMO it's just gone. Like the Joker and his magic pencil. No reason ever given.

oberonw
oberonw

I recruit and train teachers for overseas jobs. I have encountered fake ads, not to get money, but to harvest credentials. "Great job! Send us your diplomas, passport, birth certificate, etc." Legally most Asian countries can and will ask for more than can be asked in the US, but many, if not most, ads are fake. Don't give anything until you have solid information on the folks asking questions.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

They hook people in like any other business. It's wrong. But what's worse for some is having no job when you need it the most. I've worked for several different agencies over the years doing manual labor jobs. The work is abusive; the pay is terrible, and the hours are long. The only positive thing was that I had employment in a poor city. No one was hiring directly unless through an agency. The hardest part is making it past the temp hire time period and getting re-hired again. Many people get cut when the contract is up and don't make it due to many factors. It's a meat grinder. What do you do? You gotta work to get money. And without money; you gets nothin.

Al Plastow
Al Plastow

These people do, indeed, need to quietly removed from the gene pool. There is no excuse for these activities. Here's something else I have found quite interesting: A number of people who have contacted me about possible openings in my company have informed me that they spend literally hours wading through the SPAM that results from their resume posts. Wouldn't it be interesting if the government employment services provided more credible job/career location resources--something beyond fast serve counter help? You know the services I mean?--those government agencies we pay taxes to support?

RossHowatson
RossHowatson

One agency contacted me in January about a position that might become available in March. The company is using an agency to have a reserve supply of potential employees available should anyone leave the company after having a downsize of the department done in the fall. Reason for not hiring at this time, budget not approved.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

In a lot of places, it is illegal to advertise a job which does not exist for the purposes of conducting some other activity, such as selling a product or service. And in a bad economy with government belt tightening, it's an easy win for the DA's office that they can splash up in the local paper's headlines.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

I ONLY use disposable email addresses from yahoo (gmail has them too) for job postings. The nice part is the disposable addresses can be set to put the emails coming in on that email address in its own folder! real good for job responses. Searching sites like indeed.com, I also have a problem with endless job sites that list the same job and then are consolidated into indeed. Not indeed's fault but they don't filter them out correctly. I've found these intermediate sites ask for invasive series of questions, try to send you endless and often pretty much useless job listings, such as outside your geographic area. I've figured out to bypass them when they are too irritating, and apply directly to the sites listed, because after all their pages of invasive questions, such as how much you make, etc, which I simply fill out wrong, they then swap you over to the original company that posted the job. So why did I give the intermediate company all that info? More bizarro's, like you mentioned, jobs already filled, I saw a healthcare company "in corona, ca" looking for crystal report writer. Applied a couple times, kept showing up endlessly under different agencies with exact same wording. Finally thinking is filled, scam, etc. Good idea to visit website if you can find it of company of actual job: one website bizarro was simply a login and password for the company! So maybe I would have been signing up to work for a crime syndicate? Other times I've seen ones about company 'opening a branch' in city near me. This appeared to be fishing expedition by company, not to actually hire anyone but to guage salaries in the area in case they ever eventually decided to to that. And kudos to the few companies that eventually even reply to an application. My wife went to apply to a company. A bunch of unemployeed, probably illegal aliens were hanging around the parking lot. The address for the company had no sign over the door. She decided not to go in. Probably a good idea. I might not have ever seen her again, despite that she is working out with my in-home weight machine, and probably could take care of herself. (I mostly go to the gym nowadays).

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I must bow my head to your excellent kung fu. I will use this technique on the fell fake interviewers and credit it as the Windy City Throwdown.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

those are all scams. was exposed on local TV. Not quite sure how they worked but heard it went something like this. they send you a check, you deposit it then get you to wire them an amount using a real money transfer service inside the store you are 'shopping at'. The original check bounces and the money you wired is gone, and pretty much untraceable.

katedgrt
katedgrt

I have scored at least half of my positions off of job boards, both contract and 'perm' (which in my case seems to be about 3 years). The other half have come through networking and personal contacts. In some cases I was found, in some cases I applied for the job. I would not say NONE of the jobs on job boards exist. Now I will say that these jobs took a good lot of time and effort to find. And I will agree that there is just a lot of trash out there to sort through. But with perseverence and experience you learn which 'opportunities' are for real and not. This article just highlights another one which is not.

brettwilliams101
brettwilliams101

@brettwilliams101 Googled myself today, found this post.  Four years later, I have a degree in my field and am doing very interesting work.  If you're on the fence about getting a degree - get it.  At the least, it shows you can accomplish something big.

bfpower
bfpower

I have been exposed to some of that logic as well. And there are employers who don't require education, but do require certs. But generally those pitches are exaggerated. However, to be honest, while a degree and certifications can both be helpful, experience is the big deal in IT work. Even if it's just contributing to an open source project for a year, it puts you ahead of the others who may be otherwise on equal footing (recent grads, perhaps). I'm a soon-to-be grad, but I already have two years experience in corporate IT (I'm working full time and going to school) and have a little consulting experience as well. Those, along with a solid senior project, will go a very long way towards a strong interview if I decide to make a move after graduation.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

you should never ASSUME you are the perfect match. Never get that 'got it' feeling till you are actually hired. Use the salesperson trick of believing you ARE the right person but if it doesn't work out then walk away without feeling the least hurt. Even if they think you are perfectly suited technically, they may have other reasons for not hiring you. They might have decided your personality didn't match and there was someone who was as skilled or more or slightly less who they thought was a better match or who had a more stable job history, etc.

patrickintl
patrickintl

To us recruiters all the time. we take a job order, spend weeks finding what the compnay says they want, then BOOM - the position is tabled, and the candidates won't ever call us back because they think we sold them a bill of goods. Well, not everyone takes it personally, but enough do. And companies don;t give us reasons either..

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

asking for alot of stuff that could cause ID theft also on applications online, including SSN.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

use a DISPOSABLE email address. Yahoo and gmail both have them.

LT Dan
LT Dan

OP noted the following quote: "Some of the job postings ? sometimes for positions long filled ? also could be from recruiting agencies looking to collect r?sum?s.? Beware of postings by (Federal) Government contractors, or at least read them carefully. Lots of "available" positions will note "Pending Award," which means the job doesn't exist unless the "hiring" contractor actually wins award of the government contract. Always, always ask the recruiter if the contract/program in question has been awarded before spending any time and money beyond an initial phone call. Some contractors will just fish resumes so that they can present the candidates as example talent to the procuring agency - whether or not they have any intention of actually hiring the examples. Buyer beware.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Bogus salaries really p*ss me off. Advertising 3X the going rate just to get resumes in. $120K for a Java developers with a top secret clearance (and SCI + full scope poly). Right. Sure. Rot in hell recruiter/hr trolls.

SObaldrick
SObaldrick

These are some of the things to be suspicious of: - any email that contains a 'free' email address, gmail, hotmail etc. - any company that doesn't list their URL - any email that mentions $s. And of course, if I have not heard of the company the first thing I do is research them prior to replying to their advertisement or email. There are a lot of companies that claim to help you get back to work by working on your resume and getting it posted for non-externally advertised positions within companies. Read about peoples experiences with these companies before signing up. Les.

ctaylor
ctaylor

...does anyone else remember an "anonymous employer" with a PO Box address posting a position with the intent of replacing existing staff with a less costly replacement. I've heard these (and other icky) conversations happening inside conference rooms with thin walls. If the employee is also looking and inadvertently sends in a resume for their own position it creates even one more reason to push the employee out.

doughtymartin
doughtymartin

Golden rule 1 - Never pay for an agency to help you, they get a huge fee when they place you and that is what they (should) earn their money from. GR 2 - If you get asked to come in for an interview then ask if you will get your travel expenses paid there and then. If they say no then ditch them. GR 3 - Do some homework. I see jobs advertised and if I can work out who the company is (Google is wonderful for this) then I apply direct. GR 4 - If one agency has the same advert, usually word perfect copies, but in several locations then it is a trawl to get CV's in, don't waste your time with these. GR 5 - Don't waste your time by applying for jobs you either can't do or don't want, you are unlikely to make it to the interview stage and you would hate the role anyway. GR 6 - Smile, be happy, stay positive and don't give up. Would anyone like to add to the rules?

lltaylor
lltaylor

I am approaching retirement age (within the next few years depending on the economy) and am looking for that final job that would be enjoyable but challenging in the area I wish to retire --- warm sunny Arizona. I can't begin to count the number of resumes I have put out, most without a reply, not even thinking about the position not being legitimate. I like the idea of locating companies within the area and going directly to their web site! Over thirty years in IT work and only four different companies (17 and a half years at one) so this job hunting is still strange to me. Now it's even frightening! Hard to go to a new area in the country where I have no networking to help land that great job!

BBOURKLAND
BBOURKLAND

It seems to be better to research the employers in a particular area you want to work for and visit their websites directly for job openings and submissions of applications. Forget Dice, Career Builder, etc.

drodr05
drodr05

I do a lot of contract work. And, from time to time, I do get emails from recruiters for job opportunities. What I hate the most, is, when a recruiter sends an email, lists this great job I know I can do, but it is WAY outside my geographical area. I live in Indiana, but about 25 minutes west of Louisville, KY. The last three emails that I received, from different recruiters, where for jobs in Lansing, MI, St. Louis, MO, and someplace near Chicago, IL. Take the St. Louis, MO, email. I send an email back to the recruiter explaining that St. Louis is over a four hour drive for me, one-way, and I am not in the position to move at this time. A few minutes later I get a response from the recruiter stating that, (and this was his response. Really, I kid you not,)"St. Louis doesn't look THAT far from your location on the map." :( A simple 'remedial' geography lesson would work in this case. And I am not saying all recruiters are idiots. They are not! It's just that sometimes a little forethought would be helpful when sending out email broadcasts for a job listing.

Ken Cameron
Ken Cameron

Google "MGA Jobs", click on CareerBuilder one. You will see hundreds of jobs. Click on CIO/CTO. Read Job Description. They blatently state that the job specs match of profile of typical execs they want to provide services for. I sent a comment email to Careerbuilder about them. Never heard back (Ad money talks!!!) I've heard they really want to charge the exec $3000-$10000 for "Career Coaching".

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

R publik edyoucayshun meh knot teech uhs reedin and rightin, butt coreupshun...wee gaht et doun patt!! ;)

lhdelvaille
lhdelvaille

I interviewed for a Systems Admin position the other day, and there was not one techinical question asked. They had me do a wonderlic test, and a face to face with the HR director, who was looking for some one to fit the corp culture. I had no contact with techinical people at all, and their job ad was posted for almost a month after my interview.

reisen55
reisen55

Once years ago I had an interview, if I can call it such, for a small company in upstate New York. As soon as I saw the storefront, I knew it was a joke, but since I had driven more than a few miles, I felt an obligation to at least walk in and sit down. Did so. Tiny shop, nothing to talk about - I was in sales at the time - when into the room comes the family dog, almost size of a bear and he is HAPPY today, drooling on everything and just in the way, monster tail wagging, smashing into everything including me. I just began to laugh out loud and walked out.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

Modify your contract so that you can tell candidates who the companies playing these games are. Maybe you can't post their names on a wall of shame and refuse to interview with them without guarantees of say 3 year no right to fire work contracts, but candidates sure can and do. I can name off at least half-a-dozen places that I tell people they never should waste their time even interviewing, much less being abused as an employee.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Given the likely number of non-military software developers with an active TS-SCI and the even more remote probability that either of them ( ;) ) may actually be a [u]good[/u] Java developer, $120K may not be too far out of the ballpark...

cbellur
cbellur

One thing -- a lot of job postings on corp sites are already earmarked for someone else. Legally, they have to open the position, but they have a contractor that they are going to hire as FTE, so that's what is it for. I don't think DICE or the other job boards do this. HR depts typically don't post openings on job sites if they are intended for internal candidates. The best luck I had was going with a recruiter, but this was back in 2000. I have had the same job since. But the recruiter I worked with matched me up with people who already wanted to hire me. I actually screwed up a few interviews, but I still got offers from every place I interviewed at. Since the companies all knew I was interviewing and had offers at other places, salary negotiation was a breeze, and was done by my recruiter. I don't know how well this will work in a recession... probably not as much interest but I think they will try to get you into places where they already are interested in you. Of course, if you are one of these d-bags that lies on their resume, good luck. As someone who interviews people, I am so dissapointed when I see some guy with this awesome resume, but they just put every buzz word they heard in the office... SQL and every database, but they can't answer a simple SQL question. The thing is -- these people eventually get hired by some d-bag manager that thinks their resume is true and impressive, and doesn't know enough to ask interview questions that can establish the true skill level of the candidate...

MikeGall
MikeGall

I applied for a developer position a couple years ago on a Saturday afternoon. 15 minutes later I get a phone call from the owner of the company. Wow, on the spot interview. The job seemed interesting and I was just looking more into the companies product offering when he called. One of the first questions: "What do you know about the company?", it was one of those oh crap moments. I know the dev job looks cool, and I was just looking up the company stuff, perhaps if you waited a day ... Anyways here's the funny part. As the interview progresses he asks me what I'm looking for for a starting salary. I'd only been out working in the industry for a year at this point and asked for what I know to be a reasonable starting salary for my position. He says, oh wow that is quite high, some people here make that much but that is usually after 5 years. He wanted to pay me 50% less than I currently was making and have me relocate to a big city were the cost of living was easily double where I was living. He even said "Do you know anyone else that would like to work here? Perhaps you could move in together and share expenses." Okay, you offer way below a reasonable salary (we are talking below average salary for any worker, not even talking for skilled labor), and then try to give me advice on how to structure my personal life so I can live on what you are offering? Crazy.

keciakateyez
keciakateyez

that's hilarious! I too get those recruiter and contract based job emails, and you are speaking the truth about the locations being outrageously too far, for travel. Question...have you had a lot of success with working mainly contract jobs? I get a lot of offers, but I am not used to working contract and I am afraid to accept them, because of the unknown and that I may end up in a spiral of endless contract employment!

MyopicOne
MyopicOne

Interviewed for a Development Manager job in the MD suburbs of DC where I live. Finished second in that running, and the recruiter called back to ask if Pittsburgh was a doable commute for a similar position. Nothing against Pittsburgh but ROFL at the thought of a 5-6 hour commute each way!

alex.kashko
alex.kashko

Is one of a growing number of sites charging jobhunters for being put in touch with their large list of recruiters. Experteer is another. I do not know if Such sites provide a genuine service. I think they will die once the recession is over

AllenM
AllenM

I have been through so many interviews, the direct ones have been good, but the staffing firms (or other as described here) are simply a time and money (yes, your own time whether working or not has a dollar figure) waster. I like your advice, and since I am in Chicago (now the new home of the Windy City throwdown), maybe I should give it a try :).

KSoniat
KSoniat

...and glad you escaped that one.

Crystaldc
Crystaldc

Glassdoor.com? It's a site to check and review companies. It's a free sign up and when you post a review you have access to companies' ratings, reviews, etc. I applied for a position with a company and checked glassdoor after I applied. It turns out that management is known to yell at their employees and basically treat them like sh*t. Luckily for me the position was removed due to the economy. And yes, I take the reviews with a grain of salt, but it can be enlightening. So, please post your reviews of the companies you're thinking about.

katedgrt
katedgrt

In a recent position where I had a hiring advisory position, my manager 3 times was undercut on the offer she proposed and 3 times we not only lost the target candidate but all our runners up evaporated by the time the low-balled offer was (DUH!) rejected. This position was one I interviewed for over the space of 3 months, all because HR couldn't get the scheduling right.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I am very aware of how much behind the scenes manuevering goes on with open positions, having been the person making the decision myself in past positions also. I was thinking more of the companies that query for candidates, do a ton of interviews and then just never seem to get around to hiring anyone. If the management of the company wants to play games with keeping internal assets in the mix that don't have the skills needed and won't train the people to get those skills, then they deserve to have their name up on the wall. Maybe seeing them listed as a place that professionals shouldn't waste their time might be a wake up call when no one posts for the position. Then the upper management might get some feedback as to what is really going on. It's been my experience that upper management really doesn't have a clue as to what the normal business practices are for their organization as they are busy plotting strategy, marketing, new product ideas, etc. for the business, which is what they are paid to do. The VP of human resources is the person that should have their hand on the tiller and generally don't. In most organizations that I have been associated with over the last 20 years, HR has moved from the role of finding employees and keeping them productive for the company to a quasi-branch of the legal department to keep the company from getting sued. And that is the real source of the issue. They are too busy doing the legal department's unwanted functions and anything else that management doesn't want to deal with, such as poor employee behavior, than to find, hire and retain the best.

pwoodctfl
pwoodctfl

I am a contractor, but I am a voice in the hiring process around here and have had jobs where I was the hiring decision maker. Here is the deal....a new project comes up, will need 5 people with skill set Y and you are authorized to find people to fill the need. You interview 12 to find 7 candidates because not all of them are going to accept. That means that at least two people are not going to be chosen even though they are perfectly acceptable candidates. This can get even more complicated if Murray down the hall doesn't have the skill set but is out of a job unless we take him on to the project. We all like Murray and want to give her a chance. That means 3 perfectly competent people will be disappointed. But it gets better. Although we bid 5, interviewed 7 and subbed 1 to come down to four hirees, management has decided that we will have to make do with less. Therefore, our original team of 5 is down to 3 and with Murray having a lock on the one position (a political favor) we will be hiring only 2. Your position has just been eliminated and although we would have been happy to have you, we are stuck and won't be able to hire anyone until Murray screws up or finds another place to land and management realizes that we can't make the schedule with just 2 people. By that time, we have thoroughly annoyed the talent pool and our next round of interviews don't get nearly the quality of our first, but that is the way it goes. It is ugly, but it is reality.

drodr05
drodr05

Haven't seen these job postings in awhile but there was some postings on Careerbuilder for MARS Internationl(?). They would give a brief description and make you go to their website and look at their job listings. But in order to submit your resume they wanted pertinent information, like your Social Security Number, when you filled out their application. Sorry, I never give out my SSN to anyone until I know I have the job and I am filling out an I9.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Finding cleared people is easy. A company that can prove even $60K for cleared developers (and that the employee won't have to provide the equipment) will have no vacancies.

VidyaS3
VidyaS3

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