Social Enterprise

Blog your way to employment


I came across an article today that gave me one of those "I never thought of that, but OF COURSE!" moments. The article, entitled How Blogs Are Changing The Recruiting Landscape appeared on the CareerJournal.com site. The sentence that really struck me was "Corporate recruiters are surfing blogs to unearth job candidates, expanding their talent pool and gaining insights they say they can't get from resumes and interviews."

Let me just take a moment here and mention that I spend about 78% of my blogging time skewering most of the regular practices of HR people and hiring managers. Think I'm one of their favorite people? Oh, I don't think so.

My personal liabilities aside, this blog thing could really be a boon for those of you who use it wisely. If you're an IT person and you blog about technology products or the best ways to set up IT processes, that would be very attractive to prospective employers. In fact, the article says, "Most blog-related recruits are professionals in technology and media because jobs in these fields often require knowledge of the blogosphere."

I have to admit that I've scouted writers for TechRepublic through blogs they've written. It's one thing to hear someone tell you how qualified he is, but quite another to read about the practical manifestations of his knowledge.

I've actually discovered some writers for TechRepublic by reading their blogs.

Here are some tips from the article for making your blog "recruiter-friendly":

  1. Clearly identify your specialty.
  2. Show you're current on hot topics.
  3. Provide more information. (Include a resume or a link to a social networking site you use.)
  4. Exercise common sense--Don't write anything negative about former employers. (Now I'm really starting to get paranoid.)
  5. Omit personal information.
  6. Keep it polished and current
  7. Contribute to other blogs. (This draws more traffic and boosts its search-engine rankings.)

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

8 comments
webmaster
webmaster

Hi, This is a really great site and good job of yours. I would definitely like to visit it again. I have also a good site to offer you which provides Web Application Framework, (RoR) Ruby on Rails Software Development India and Indian PHP Developers http://rightwaysolutions.blogspot.com

blog2hersh
blog2hersh

i certainly agree bloggin is a good way of being noticed by the people from your field. Ever sice Ihave started my blg I make sure its in all my email sgnatures. I like to brag about it in open and why not! Hersh Bardwaj http://hershbhardwaj.blogspot.com

mdhealy
mdhealy

At a critical point in my career, about a dozen years ago I got an email message from the acquisition editor for a publisher of technical books. She was looking for somebody to write a chapter on how to write database interfaces for the web in Perl (which was then cutting-edge technology). She picked me because my USENET postings on the subject demonstrated (1) that I knew how to do it and (2) that I could write. That book chapter opened up several other writing opportunities, which in turn helped get me the job I have now.

sgamby_joejr
sgamby_joejr

If anything, I've always wondered how experts become professional bloggers, but I've never thought about blogs as employment vehicles. It's applying a soft process to a technology that is pervasive to the internet. It's such a novel idea, yet effective. I changed my blog profile to reflect more of what guidelines you have posted here. My blog is relatively new and highlights my tasks as an IT professional and business owner. For fear as spam, I took out my blog URL. If anybody thinks I should put it back up, please let me know. I didn't want it as spam. Professional courtesy, I guess.

ManiacMan
ManiacMan

Hopefully, you'll be seeing it in the next month's edition in the section titled "Never Again". I've published technical documents before for previous employers, but never outside of the private domain. Let's hope the editors like my article and decide to publish it.

leary.mary
leary.mary

Congratulation on your new book. I am considering writing a book one day also. May you can give me some tips. Much success

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