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Career sabotage by co-workers: Does it really happen?

Career sabotage by a co-worker -- it sounds like the plot of a bad made-for-TV movie. But does it really happen? In this blog, we address a case that may or may not be attributable to co-worker malice.

Career sabotage by a co-worker -- it sounds like the plot of a bad made-for-TV movie. But does it really happen? In this blog, we address a case that may or may not be attributable to co-worker malice.

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I was listening to a friend of mine lament yesterday about a co-worker who she felt was trying to sabotage her at work. At first, I was dismissive, thinking that career sabotage was only practiced in bad Lifetime movies. But the more she spoke, the more examples she cited, the more I wondered.

Of course, none of the examples she recalled were as drastic as the ones in those Lifetime movies -- that is, none included punctured tires or poisoned lattes -- but their cumulative effect was just as toxic. There were numerous e-mails in which the co-worker "nicely" pointed out some detail that my friend had missed. This detail would be something so obscure that my friend was convinced that the woman stayed up half the night finding it. She would copy their boss on this and then very sweetly offer to take care of the issue if she was too busy.

Now e-mails like those are passive-aggressive one-two punches. She is indicating that a ball was dropped but also demonstrating to the boss her gung ho work ethic by volunteering to pick up the pieces. Fortunately, the boss was not one to concern himself with details as long as long-term goals were being met. But then a couple more of these e-mails came through, and my friend started to think "conspiracy theory."

So let me take the high road for a second. Let's say the co-worker is freakishly detail-oriented and is genuinely one of those "I just want to help" people and is copying the boss on the e-mail so he can see the positive things she does for the company. She may be totally unaware that in being helpful, she's also casting a shadow over a co-worker. I believe on some level the co-worker feels very threatened by my friend's competence. She may not even be aware of her motives. I suggested that she speak to the woman and explain how the e-mails may be interpreted. If the co-worker is dismayed by that, the problem may be solved. If, on the other hand, she twirls her mustache menacingly and laughs, the problem may be just beginning.

But then my friend explained that this person had also taken credit in meetings for things my friend had said. For example, they would be discussing a problem, and my friend would make a point. In a team meeting later, the co-worker would reiterate the point as if she had just thought of it.

This could be another instance in which one could assume malice when there may be none. But years ago, I worked for a guy who I met with regularly. In one meeting, I would mention an idea, and the very next day when we met again, he would present my ideas back to me like they were his own. We eventually got to be on good terms, so that I could jokingly say, "Yeah, I know, I said that yesterday." He actually wasn't aware he was doing it -- somewhere the idea I espressed mingled around in his brain for 24 hours, and he'd just remembered it as his own. Some people are like that. Is that the case with this person? I don't know. Is my friend insecure and paranoid? I don't know that either.

I'd like to know your experiences with career sabotage if you have any. I'm curious as to how often this really happens.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

109 comments
codingArtist
codingArtist

Yes, often this happens. The best prevention is to make sure you report to the same person who hired and can fire you. A co-worker who has been around longer or one step higher - who has more clout and contact with your boss, can destroy you. Watch out for the glory seeking co-worker who feels threatened by you; they'll act like they are your friend and have your best interests at heart, meanwhile they'll discredit your ability and performance to your boss, and you'll not know what hit you until the day you get let go.

lambcourt
lambcourt

Does it really happen? ALL THE TIME. Both I and numerous colleagues/friends have seen this sort of thing go on - regardless of the line of business, nature of the job etc. Probably the last time you saw such tactics was in junior school, which is why it takes a while to realise what's really going on - it is so hard to accept the playground mentality which can exist in the workplace. Insecurity and jealousy seem to be the motivators. Those who lack the talent to progress on their own merits try to do so by marring those of others. If you're good at your job, you will almost certainly be seen as a threat by someone. If you happen to be pleasant and popular too, you will inevitably put someone's back up just by existing. Watch out for 'dirty tricks' and bullying. Going back to the main article, if something seems as if it may have a dubious motive, such as this co-worker's emails, then sadly it almost certainly does. These people have got the use of the email cc and bcc down to a fine art. I'm afraid that based on experience I would say you cannot afford to give the benefit of the doubt and need to take a 'zero tolerance' approach. If you can't solve it directly with the offender, use your line manager or HR team to quash it before it starts to cause any real damage. Remember, you may be doing others a favour - you may not be the only 'victim'.

Abbicat
Abbicat

There is no such thing as innocence when it comes to such conduct. They know what they are doing. Acting clueless to their intentional passive/aggressive acts is not a free pass for the knife that was just placed in my back. On their resumes they should list the art of manipulation as a talent. I only have two words for such people - grow up.

MikeZane
MikeZane

When the person attacking you has clout. I have been the victim of a systematic person who has the ear of every high up person here at the company I work. She would pretty much do as your article says, search desperately for something to criticize, only she'd cc the entire team, not just my boss. If I received a compliment for something, she would immediatly counter it with a criticism. It got to where I couldn't work with her anymore and was confined to work with only certain parts of the team. You know, what goes around comes around tho, she has been seriously ill and I have been working fine with the team in her absence. I wouldn't wish anyone ill, but it has been peaceful lately. Without her criticizing everything I do, people are a lot happier with my work. My work hasn't changed, it is stil high quality, but she isn't hear to color it in a negative light. Yes, it is petty and childish, but it is what makes up our corporate world. The same game is played everywhere, and you just have to navigate best you can.

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howletrc
howletrc

The issue I have is that the person who hates me has been friends with the boss for 15 years and has learned to take situations out of context and present the situation to the boss in a bad light, for example, when we fly to a remote job site we pack our tools and test equipment, I ussually help to lug the boxes around from the vehicles to the airport and to the sites, but once I was busy with another issue and had not helped, he told his friend the boss that it seems I am not around when the heavy stuff needs to be moved. You can't fight back because it is true if you don't look at the full context. He can string enough of out of context instances and really getcha in trouble, and it always ends up sounding like your making excuses for bad behavior!

MPG187
MPG187

I am looking for a new job now because of very jealous people...

skatediy
skatediy

Please take off your rose-colored glasses! After spending 3 years busting my but, having a supervisor who points out every tiny mistake, real or imagined, I am not having my contract re-newed. However, as this has been the pattern and practice of the sup & her best friend, the administration has offered me at least part time work providing tech support to another department. Read NYTimes: The Bully in The Next Cubicle. One question: I know the supervisor and her male counterpart use hacked software at the company, make illegal copies of movies etc. but have never turned them in becaue it will be a fire fight. Opinions? thanks

miny_minks
miny_minks

Yes it happens.. In my case too, as my colleague is senior(by joining.. not by rank) to me he feels that he has right to be right. if he is wrong and i suggest something better in meeting he takes care of it that, the point is explained by him in the meeting as if it was his own and after coming back from the meeting will say " see what i told you this is better way of doing things... you still have to learn a lot dear..." further, he will never miss any chance to share credit with me for the things he was involved in, but nowhere in the seen when he feels things are not in favor... but i feel such people have habit of growing on other's shoulders.. they do not have courage to face challenges.. but this annoys a lot

bella_latte
bella_latte

In these very scary economic times I recently walked out on a job because I could no longer cope with the level that a co-worker was stooping to make herself appear invaluable whilst stealing everyone elses ideas, claiming their work as her own and then demeaning her co-workers to management as incompetent. The level of manipulation was audacious as well as her ability to misuse company property and assets. The longer I stayed the more complicit I became to an intolerable work environment where ethical behaviour and conduct is a 'bad word'. Please to say that i jumped out of the frying pan into project management heaven in my new job. Bosses do start to realise that malicious practices on other levels in the org create bad practice and loss of productivity for everyone. They are the covert bullies and make peoples lives a misery. Wake up management and Get rid of them. U know who they are in your work pool.

mike_patburgess
mike_patburgess

The workplace is no different than being in a jungle where the rules of the jungle apply. However, good managers can see through the nonsense and if they can, should put the "saboteur" in their place; maybe even citing issues with their own work. Be prepared for these types of people and one step ahead. I thought that one of my acquaintences whom I have known for quite some time was a friend but he was also my boss. Again, I thought that he was looking out for my best interests in the company by pointing out all of the hard work that I was doing. Fast forward two years. The boss was actually fired for lack of performance and I was told that he was not doing any favours for me in the corporation. I'm still doing the hard work which is still acknowledged.

maggie_t
maggie_t

Some people still think it's not fair to hit people in glasses! Seriously, when the company's losing money and replacing staff with contracted off-shore 'resources' there is panic. It's human nature to want to save yourself - to keep paying the mortgage, private school tuition, college bills, car notes, support the non-working spouse, whatever - to keep what you have is integral to the psyche. I have worked to keep my job by doing my job, others are weaker - morally and skill-set wise and try other tactics. My department is losing money, I'm working on three critical project and working long hours. Another project was just cancelled and a weaker staff member from that project has been assigned to one of my projects. His idea of getting ahead is to have others do his work and he take the credit while trying to cozy up to management. Some of management is aware of this and some are not. I cringe to think of what the next few weeks are going to be like before the next cuts occur. I'm not looking forward to it. I'm trying so hard to have good work relationships - I don't need to be 'buddies' but I need to be respected and trusted. The new addition to our team is not the respecting kind and he'll be frantically trying to grab what he can. This article and the comments posted are helping me plan. One thing I want to point out - by the time you find out you're being let go the "lay-off list" was made; management has already ranked you and justified why you, in particular, were to be included on that list. At that point you will not have the opportunity to present your documentation, it would take an act of G*d to get that list changed, and maybe not even then. As distastful as it is, you have to push back on bad behavior, colloborate with others to make sure you are backed up and keep showing up at your managers' door to keep him informed on these issues. This is a whole dimension to the workplace that I try to avoid. It's going to happen and I'm going to have to deal with it or I'll get pushed out.

gautamkum
gautamkum

Once an individual starts to earn for himself/herself, he/she is completely responsible for their deeds. Shadowing a coworker is a clear indication of establishing one self in an organization, such people can be categorized as sick people. Its better to be away from them, who knows you will be next.

jas_jordan
jas_jordan

The bottom line is, be careful who you trust in the workplace as most people have little honor and will throw you under the bus if they can the moment it benefits them.

rachellara
rachellara

There's actually a lot of research on this subject already. Google "workplace psychopaths" and read all. This is a very real issue that I can't imagine is only occuring in the 00s. It happens most frequently to people who are very intelligent and/or highly qualified/skilled, but somewhat submissive, allowing their colleague, or as is most often the case, manager, to do whatever they please in order to advance their own career. Usually, it goes unseen as they generally target one person. So the result is no one else (unless given the complete rundown with evidence!) can believe it as they only see the manipulator side of the workplace psychopath's character (ie the side that gets them to where they are!). In most cases, they are very successful people that get away with it because we are too naive to believe that people can be so cunning. So if you feel you are being treated "unjustly" and especially if it's by someone in a higher position or someone competing for a promotion, think again and assess whether they could actually be a workplace psychopath. Apparently, the best thing to do (which is not too easy at the moment!) is leave the department/company and complain.

njoy_d_ride
njoy_d_ride

Wrong two words. @$$holes like this need to have been taught morals a LONG tome ago. They need help of another kind.

lbreit
lbreit

Here is a great resource: http://bullyonline.org/workbully/index.htm A few years back I was having a terrible time at work and actually searched these forums for workplace harrassment and discovered a link to information about workplace bullying. I too was a target of unrelenting detail harrasement, bait and switch work requirements (so of course I was never right) and complaints about my work to the boss. Turned out that my bully had a bad history in previous organizations, including a lawsuit, and since we were peers and I had seniority, HR really did listen to me (when usually HR depts. don't listen to targets). My best advice: Read the link above. Document everything. Research the bully -they often have some interesting information about them out on the web. Don't go in for 'joint counselling' -it is like putting a wife beater with a beaten wife -not healthy. KEEP YOUR RECORDS PRIVATE AND AWAY FROM THE OFFICE! It was such a relief to realize that she was just frightened of my competence in an area that she was not competent. Shaking my confidence in myself and to others was her 'need'. I asked to not work with her, and she had to be 'nice' to me. Was great to see her force a smile when we passed in the hall. She couldn't take it, so she left shortly after that. Now, a few years later, it seems to be starting again with another newer coworker. Time to deploy the old actions and cover myself as best as I can. Tough to be good at what we do, huh?

Sumjay
Sumjay

This may be slightly off topic, but if anyone has watched the hit TV show "Ugly Betty", there are a lot of "Lessons learned" in the show, as far as professional back biting and conspiracies which occur daily in our corporate world. So pay attention to situations at work which affect you. Try to be objective and read between lines and listen to your intuitive gut feelings to be one step ahead of the one who wants to sabotage your career.

ginny
ginny

It absolutely happens and will continue to happen unless management steps up and stops it. I suspect in most cases, confronting the person who is exhibiting this behavior does no good. The person in question is doing it intentionally and won't stop until they get what they want. This kind of behavior makes for a hostile work environment where there is no trust, no loyalty and no confidence in management.

buddyfarr
buddyfarr

One of my last jobs we implemented a helpdesk system to track everything that we were doing. Once it was in for about 3 months we had an outsider audit our department to see what we could improve on. He asked me what we used to track our calls and how I was doing. He was amazed at the number of calls I had taken care of in the 3 months that we had it up and running, (which really didn't seem that much to me). We talked about other things and then about a week later my boss shut the whole tracking system down and said we had to go back to tracking everything on paper. I believe that he didn't like the light that it put him in. Oh well, off to a better job anyway.

cyberharp
cyberharp

Welcome to my world. It can and does happen, even in traditionally non-competitive, typically cooperative environments. And it also can be fostered and encouraged by the boss, as well. I, too, have been a victim many times. I also might have been one of those people who happened to catch some little something that needed to be fixed and let the other person know, while copying the boss if he had been copied on the first email. My reasoning would be to prevent the other person from receiving the same comment from all of the others addressed by the original email, because I tend to assume that I have found an error that everyone else will see when they have time to review the email. (I may have a talent for seeing errors.) Perhaps it is better to let them get multiple emails in reference to the same error? I have simply never thought of that action as possibly harming a career, but it is worth reconsideration. Then, again, overt competition of this nature in the work place has never really been on my radar. When it is done to me, I usually learn about it from others or after it has taken its toll (like when a supervisor, the only person with the key to the building, decided to discipline me for coming to work late because I had to wait for him to open the building so I could enter and log on). (The only evidence I was late was the record that I was logging on late, and personal testimony was the only defense. Fortunately, I was not the only person waiting for the guy with the key.) It has never made sense to me to deliberately beat another down to make yourself rise, but it does happen. In the case of supervisors, I have learned that sometimes they create disciplinary situations to demonstrate their range of experience as a supervisor and how well they have improved the performance of their people as their supervisor. So they create a problem to be solved, take action, then show how the employee improved, making their efforts look worthy. In truth, the problem was manufactured and the supervisor's efforts worsened his relationship with his employee, and the employee continued being the good employee he was later on. So, officially, the supervisor sabotaged a bit of the employee's career in order to make himself look good, knowing that the employee would simply be his good self and move forward.

BubbaGlock
BubbaGlock

Yes, they need to grow up. Guess they are insecure and feel threatened so they have to do these things to feel secure. So much for just doing your best and let the cards fall where they should.

margsi2
margsi2

YES! It absolutely does happen! It ranges from extremely subtle to extremely bold and anywhere in between at any given time. Jealousy is a major factor in that behavior and it is alive and well every single day.

han810p
han810p

Been there, seen that. When this starts to happen, you need to cya - but always take the high road. People who have a need to put others down to succeed are usually covering a weakness, usually in technical or business knowledge. Keep your eyes open and show your talents in the best light.

Snak
Snak

Cats can be described as 'evil' in the way they play with and torture defenceless, smaller animals. Whales can possibly be said to be 'evil', in the way they play volley-seal. But Humans have the capacity to be truly monsterous - all of us have this capacity. Luckily most of us are big enough to rise over this and not do it. But some, for a whole variety of reasons, jealousy, insecurity, bad hair day, no conjugal rights the night before, can be truly nasty. And some, sadly, are just nasty. For someone who believes that we can live together in harmony and without injustice, I find it hard to accept any semblence of 'humanity' in these people and, to be honest, I feel they should just die and let us get on with trying to make the world a better place. The worst of it is, the truly satanesque have no thought (or conscience) of the indirect damage they do. If by lies and slyness they cause someone to lose a job, then it's not only (s)he who is the victim who suffers. It's everyone connected to that person - including their children. It's difficult to spot, because the accomplished Slime is practiced. One of the best tricks in the book is to build a lie based on truth. Take a truth that can be verified, and tack on a twist that cannot and you have the perfect weapon. It's a pity that Hell is a myth - I would love to watch these Slimes burn. Still, to anyone who has suffered from this, I would say be patient. Karma is often the best revenge. Or you could pop by their place, kidnap and give away their pets, assuming they're the kind of person who would have a pet. Perhaps not - you need to be somewhat selfless to have a pet. I only have one word for these people: die. Two words is a waste of breath.

signalgk
signalgk

I've been a victim on several occasions of co-workers trying to undermine my work in the workplace. I remember a co-worker who did very little and subsequently left (before she was pushed) that was very good at claiming credit for others work. This caused me a great deal of problems as it often appeared to my bosses as though I was claiming creditr for work she was doing (she spent a great deal of her time emailing ideas, suggestions and 'work' reports while I'm inclined to just get on and do the work) but a short time later the wheel came unstuck as she was promoted to her own, separate assignments which needless to say, failed to get done and she then left. A couple of years later I was on an interview panel for a Council position and we were interviewing candidates for a development job which this person applied for. Her CV listed all my projects (including several I'd completed after she had left work) as her own. I mentioned the matter to the panel who decided to interview her anyway. Imagine her surprise when she came into the interview and looked up to see myself smiling at her and asking her to tell me about the achievements listed in her CV and application! Needless to say, she choked and almost ran from the interview room. Needless to say, she never applied for a job locally again.

staffordd
staffordd

"Take your rose colored glasses off. There is no such thing as innocence when it comes to such conduct. They know what they are doing. Acting clueless to their intentional passive/aggressive acts is not a free pass for the knife that was just placed in my back. On their resumes they should list the art of manipulation as a talent. I only have two words for such people - grow up." I could not agree more. I have two more words for such people - GET OUT! There are people like this where I work, and I give them wide berth. But, if they mess with me, they will be sorry, because I will down to HR in a flash talking about diversity and my right to dignity in the workplace!!!!! And don't ever forget - you HAVE a right to dignity, in the workplace, and in the world! Don't EVER let some idiot take that from you. And if they do, GO to your manager and take action against them immediately. Life is too short, you spend SO much of your life at work, that it's just ludicrous that you would have to spend it with, let's face it, sick, manipulative, hateful, thoughtless, ruthlessly-ambitious and purely evil "people". When behaviours like this are first identified, the employee doing the manipulating or harm or insinuating or taking credit for the work of others or ANY of the things we are discussing here, should be SEVERLY disciplined and warned to stop. It's an infringement on the victim's rights in the workplace, no one wants to come to work and be victimised! If, after being warned by their manager to desist, this horrible behaviour continues, they should be terminated immediately without a reference. If you think that's too harsh, think again, think what these peoples' "behaviour" does to their victims' feelings and mental and even physical well-being. Discipline followed by termination. The only way to cut out the cancer. And that's what it is - cancer. I come to work to WORK, not to play mind games with mentally ill/deranged/deluded/power mad idiots. Let's behave like mature adults, and come to work, do the work, be a team, and NOT come down to the level of backstabbing and the incredibly vicious, hurtful behaviours that folk are describing in this thread! Grow up, or get out! Out the door, and don't come back. This is just nonsense!!!! My .02 peace dave :-)

tech4me
tech4me

Like Abbicat said, these people are not innocent of their actions simply because they are ignorant of their behavior. I work in a small IT support team and have upset a co-worker by simply being better at my job then she is. Although I started a few months after her, I picked up all the systems quicker then her and became the boss' favorite (he'd give me the tough jobs or have me supporting the VIPs). This led to my co-worker becoming jealous and fearful I would become next in line for a promotion. This isn't me blowing my own trumpet either, as everyone in my team picked up on this and respect me for my skills and behaviour. It's been several months now and I have had to put up with her constantly spreading rumors and gossiping about me. She would also make little snide remarks to me or about my work whenever the bosses were around. They was never anything huge, just constant little things here and there, which added up over time are just as damaging. Several times when I confronted her she was oblivious of her actions (and never apologetic). She also takes every opportunity to suck up to the bosses on smoke breaks, ring or talk to them directly whenever possible (rather then using email or asking someone lower down the chain), etc. After we had a heated argument a few weeks back, which the boss walked in on, she's being pulling out all her little tricks to try to win over the boss' favor. Constant little things, like offering to bring the boss in left-over dinner or suddenly deciding to ask if he wants to have lunch everyday, etc. When it happens to you, honestly you'll feel like you're back in primary school again. The games she plays are so petty and childish, but people who act like her, have usually done it all their life so even though they might seem like idiots or incompetent at their work, they're well practiced in being manipulative and cunning. I'm still fighting this battle, but now my boss has been made aware of it, he has opened his eyes and realizing how two-face she is around her bosses. For those affected by office politics like this, if it's a co-worker, bring it to the attention of your boss. I tried to play the nice guy as long as possible and ignore her behavior. This just made it worse because my bosses only ever heard one side of the story. When she slandered me in private they would not come to me to verify anything because she had told them in private. Now they're heard my side of the story though her grave has been marked and the digging is left to her.

TonytheTiger
TonytheTiger

Back when we were on Windows 95, and had a lot more lax security, I knew one person who had sexually oriented websites in the history. He actually was fired... It was eventually discovered through examination of time records and eventually by eye-witness alibi that all of the websites were visited while this user was either off on leave, or not in the office. The person who planted it was never discovered, however. It would be incredibly easy to make a myspace or facebook page of the "target", post bad information, then let the existence of this page be known to others...

ajohansson
ajohansson

It's the worst when it is a top person that does this. You can almost do nothing about it. Had a manager do it to me in one place (killed my contract)and the president in another place (attempted an undeserved demotion). I didn't see it coming either time as these two were the ones that hired me in the first place.

torovictim
torovictim

Wish there was some way to hold management accountable for misjudging people and buying into lies, misplacing credit & blame - all that. After all, they supposedly got into management because they thought they had good leadership skills.

torovictim
torovictim

I tried to stay above and be a nice guy, and got pushed out.

torovictim
torovictim

But schools aren't allowed to teach morals anymore.

cyberharp
cyberharp

In recent times, I have seen a well-designed, well-developed "machine" of a work group, begin to deteriorate because of similar activities. It started when the ?assassin? came to work for us and needed training, but refused me as trainer because ?she already knew? how things needed to be done and I had nothing to teach her (despite my experience and education). She eventually did average work, and due her inexperience, created a few problems, which I was enlisted to fix ? but the supervisor was aware of the situation and was trying to give her time to improve. Then he took another job. Our little group was sloshed into a second group with an ?assassin?-type attitude, as well, so the ?assassin? became one of his favorites. He linked the good works of his group to himself and his favorite employee, making the rest look bad or needing improvement (having favorite "scapegoats" in the group for blame). He took high profile projects from others and gave them to her to do. When the "assassin" could not figure out how to do something, he helped her or told me to help her (or gave the project to me), then he and she got the credit again once the project was done. He managed to push her title up, too, because "she was doing so much work". When the ?assassin supervisor? was gone, our little groups were place all under one existing supervisor, who was blissfully unaware of the behavior and favoritism displayed by the previous supervisor and whose experience had been limited to his narrow field ? leaving him unprepared to understand our jobs and goals up-front without having to trust someone else?s information. He assumed erroneously that the information he received from the previous supervisor and his favorite (now at an elevated rank) was accurate and that the ?assassin?s? new title was well earned and deserved. This has produced inconsistent results from the group, since the ?assassin? cannot do her job without help from others, and he does not have a clue that this is not the normal way of operating. In the meantime, to continue the ruse of superiority, the ?assassin? maintains an ?impressive? dress/manner and continues to rail against the rest of us behind the supervisor?s closed doors. She is good enough at this that the supervisor hasn?t noticed that she is the only one with a problem ? that the rest of us simply fix things and move on. Until he realizes that all of his problems have one source and accepts that information, our little ?machine of a group? will continue to ?soldier on? as we can until our gears freeze, but we no longer are moving forward like we used to ? which has been noticed by our new department head. This sort of politics only takes one to get started, but it takes others to push it forward (usually in ignorance).

jhorton
jhorton

There has got to be something wrong with the water in England. Every English post I have read so far is outlandish, childish, even bordering on psychotic. I repeat an earlier statement - Whoever told you that life is fair lied to you. Get over it.

Fishstick_Kitty
Fishstick_Kitty

Wow, it looks like someone forgot to take their medication today... To condone kidnapping an innocent family pet (which would cause THEIR innocent children heartbreak) is one of the lowest things a person could do. What type of person is incapable of having a face-to-face confrontation and resorts to underhanded retaliation? What type of person takes out their vengeful anger on innocent beings who can't fight back? Your statement says more about YOUR character, not theirs. Lacking a medical degree, I can't label you as a borderline psychopath although others would be inclined to do so. Or could it be you are just one more Internet Tough Guy who uses his monitor as a shield to hide behind? If only the selfless have pets then you, just like Michael Vick are selfless. Simply put, you are nothing more than a body part that requires toilet tissue.

trimac06
trimac06

I am happy for that outcome!!!

merlock
merlock

She can be a real...you know :)

jhorton
jhorton

I agree that life is too short to put up with childish behavior and I agree that progressive discipline is the answer, but...screaming diversity? PLEASE!!! When you do something like that, you are just guilty of childish, manipulative behavior as those around you! Document, lodge an incident report with your manager (or another if they are the problem), and keep the emotion out of it. Oh, and by the way, you don't have a "right" to dignity. Dignity comes from inside you, regardless of what is done or said to or about you. You do have a right to work ina professional environment, but ultimately even that has to come from your own behavior. Whoever told you that life is fair lied to you.

bkochis
bkochis

Staffordd, I hope HR will even listen. I was just working for a large company (10,000+ employees). On an almost daily basis I would be the target of workplace hostility. The essence of it all was people who did not perform their assigned tasks and the major reason was these people did not know how to accomplish their tasks and had oversold their resumes. The worst part was that these people were all of my supervisor's "pets". In this corporation, HR was only around to protect the 'company' and nothing else. Make sure you can get to HR BEFORE you take the moral high ground! One way would be a request to review your employee file or something along those lines. Here is the US, the ability to review your file is supposedly within your rights. HA! I now have a lawsuit against my former employer for wrongful termination because I was not able to file any grievances. PS> Beyond my supervisor the next level of management was in Texas and Illinois and frankly could care less what happened as long as they did not wind up with egg on their face.

mazinoz
mazinoz

Please see my earlier post.

artanbori
artanbori

all of this may confirm you as capable technican but poor team player - it's a no win situation sympathies

matt_arnold
matt_arnold

I think you've done the right thing. Making your boss aware can only be a good thing. If you try and retaliate using their methods you are lowering yourselves to their level and this can only look bad on you. I think you must always try and act in "the correct way" and by going to your boss you are doing what other people would always consider a reasonable course of action. With any issues like this I would either.... 1) confront/mail the person in question and/or, 2) then speak to/mail my boss 3) then speak to/mail the Director By doing those things you leave yourself in a much stronger position to fight your case if things get more serious, you also leave yourself a paper trail of provable actions to defend your position with should things become more serious. Making your boss aware also means they open their eyes to things and will pick up more of the subtleties of the situation.

Anita Y. Mathis
Anita Y. Mathis

We have to learn how NOT to be a victim. At times, we leave ourselves wide open for these tests of character. At others, we've simply allowed a misunderstanding to go on too long. I believe the experience can create a very positive end-result if we learn to focus on what we believe about ourselves more than what others believe or want to believe about us. People can smell weakness a mile away.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

I work in company just recently bought out by another one. My company is better at tech support than them thus being the selling point. However, current staff is now a joining of the two operations which hasn't been smooth on a personal and schedule-wise level. In essence employees are being positioned strategically by competing managers like a chess game. Some of it is downright childish and very amateur. I'm caught in the middle as a pawn and a spectator. In this economy; it's not fun to watch these games play out. You wonder if you might possibly get laided off because of someone at the top of the food chain is attempting to head off a silent attack on their position. What I'm describing is on a macro-scale and I'm intentionally being vague. I feel this type of corporate culture clash is similar . The two-faced behavior, the back-biting, and scheming are all the same. It's not enough to hold your head down to protect yourself. There is not much you can do to protect yourself in this situations because of so many X factors. But you can control yourself and not get involved. Do you job and at the end of the day; get the hell out! Hopefully, when the dust settles things will be better. However, don't rely on it. Your own personal reputation must be upheld. Fuck all the rest.

centuryflyr1
centuryflyr1

Tools that may be beneficial Microrecorder voice activated on the extended record time. Video camera wireless to catch in the act. To record the keyboard actions perhaps a keystroke logger. Network filtering of websites honeypot. Change password requirements to access resources another recording device. Also laws regading hostile work enviornment or defemation of character potentially seek remedy that way also. Also another possible remedy may be in a private invesigator also to document. The woman has no common sense of desency or respect to treat others in such a negative manner. She is ugly and not cute in such behaviors.

KSoniat
KSoniat

.. your description could be describing my old work situation: I actually asked my coworker why she hated me, and could we work things out. She said she didn't know why she hated me, but she was from accounting I had a CS degree and came in at a high level and immediately gained a good reputation. She eventually left, but her final act was to send a delay email with scathing things written about me. It was addressed to me, but blind copied to the rest of the dept. It was so bad that many later said they expected to find me crying in my office. I was actually celebrating her leaving, but the director came in and apologized for not realizing the seriousness of the situation (we had had discussions in dealing with her before). She later called for a reference and he wouldn't give her one.

#1 Kenster
#1 Kenster

I was out of the office one day for a meeting, my boss used my computer to look for a jpeg file that was not on the network. I was shocked when he came into my office the next day, closed the door and said something to the effect of "I don't really care if you look at this kind of stuff at home but...". He opened a graphics program and boom, tons of porno pics, and websites in the history. He told me to clean it from the machine, warned me that my job was at risk from doing this, pointed out how lucky I was that he was the one that found it and not someone else, etc. Next time you're gone. I was innocent. I immediately proved with the time records that these files were all time stamped during a co-worker's lunch hour and dated when I was on the other side of the country attending a conference at the FBI academy. Butthead had a cubicle right ouside of my office where people could see his monitor walking by. He had a key that fit my office door, and would come, close the door, and look at porno to his hear't content. He thought he had cleaned up his tracks. This asshole risked my livelyhood, got caught and was not fired or even punished. My boss gave him a recomendation letter to allow him to be promoted and go to work somewhere else, just to get rid of the problem. I was pissed and read the riot act to the boss guy. It was too much trouble to fire him, so he just passed him on to someone else...

marathoner
marathoner

Make no mistake about it. The people who do this might not be consciously aware of it but they are pushing an agenda. Usually they know exactly what they are doing. They justify it the way all passive-aggressives justify -- by deluding themselves that sins of omission are somehow not really wrong. "I'm not planting porn in their computer or poisoning their latte or taking any type of overt action. So I'm not evil." Their agenda is either to promote themselves at all cost, or to sabotage a specific person, and hope that by being circumspect, passive-aggressive sneaky and manipulative, and getting others to do their dirty work, no one will notice. Sometimes they're so good the victim doesn't even know what or who hit him. And when he does detect the pattern what can he say? One or two omissions could actually be stuff got lost in the shuffle, memory slips, or didn't have full information (which is always their defense if cornered.) How many before you can PROVE it is a definite malicious plan?

alan.jackson
alan.jackson

I suffered 18 months of misdirection, harrassment and even character assasination all because a singular member of the management didn't agree with my appointment. I was finally dismissed for excessive internet use, some of which occured when I wasn't even there. Being dismissed was a mixed blessing. An unwelcome blemish on an otherwise faultless career; yet sheer relief from knowing I didn't have to to back.

mile
mile

This kind of thing happened to me personally. I used to have a female colleague who accessed web sex shopping pages. I had a complain from my superior bout it and i became suspicious. I set a detailed auditing policy and found out that someone opened those pages when i was off. Later after a month i set up a small camera hidden in the speaker box. The speaker was broken so i used it to hide the camera. I caught her with pants down and reported to my superior. She got fired a couple of weeks later. I won that one.

unellen
unellen

I might also point out that the first time it happened to me I was totally helpless. I'd come from a job with high seniority and mostly worked with a very tight knit crew that watched each others backs. Job ends, on to new situations, find one that's really good, but the person that was training me decided she wanted her job back. I was confounded when she started the snipe hunt. Got me fired. Gave me time to figure out what had happened. This forum really aught to help others in the same situation. Y'all have some really good ideas for dealing.

unellen
unellen

Just changed jobs about a year ago. The guy I work with was constantly criticizing me. I started catching him at his own game. If he did something similarly wrong, I would politely point it out. This may be the way to the end. If he said something that I had said earlier, I would thank him for bringing up what I had mentioned to him when he did it. Criticisms have gotten rarer, and customers are beginning to realize that I'm 'not just a pretty face'. It also goes a long way to boosting self esteem, when you realize that being human and erring go hand in hand. So not taking it personally leaves a smoother surface for the cat's claws to try (and fail) to sink in.

james.norris
james.norris

I always felt that a little common courtesy goes a long way?especially when dealing with those that show so little. It is not difficult for upper management (I?m a CIO by the by) to figure out quickly who is trying to play whom in this little game. I love formal escalation processes, it keeps things off my plate and lets it be dealt with at the proper level. On at least two occasions that I can remember I?ve taken direction action against the perpetrator of such shenanigans?.

ritasmall
ritasmall

It has happened to me several times and given tips on how to deal with it. Do NOT get angry, treat the symptom!! The coworker is drawing attention to your faults but looking good at the same time. Thank them for spotting it but tell them it would be easier to contact you directly so that it could be rectified immediately! Keep responding to all emails of this type with this type of tone. If they persist request issues addressed to you 1st out of courtesy and only escalated when not completed or It is in-hand and discuss with you 1st as they are reporting managed/resolved incidents!!! Do NOT assume the manager wants to be included in the email. If you are friendly with the manager then talk2him and request they intervene & (tip) but in place an escalation process for these types of problems ie they can only be cc'd after you have been informed & not before/at same time .... good luck

torovictim
torovictim

But life can be as fair as people will allow -- the trouble is two kinds of people making it less fair -- those saboteurs that are the topic of this discussion; and those who keep repeating "whoever said life it fair?"

Snak
Snak

If I offended you I'm sorry - it was a JOKE. Funnier than yours - and here's another one - If I'm an arse, my friend, you are not that far away! Now smile a little and relax. You'll feel so much better.

Lance.Carmichael
Lance.Carmichael

I had a former co-worker who went into the trash to find some incorrectly filled out documentation I had filled out. The paperwork was never filed and it was correctly filled out and filed, yet she still tried to say that I filed it.She presented it to my boss and they used it in their decisions during downsizing. I no longer work there, but I have heard that since then she was actually hit by a bus! (Not seriously injured thank goodness) but she later got let go as well.

jhorton
jhorton

This insane way of thinking (great line. I plan on stealing it) is already here...

ZTedster
ZTedster

Agreed. As soon as I heard diversity being screamed, the first thing I thought was, "Great. This insane way of thinking will soon be infecting our country as well."

jhorton
jhorton

But you might want to cut back. You, my friend, have a highly overactive imagination and a tenuous grasp of the subject matter at hand. I have been in the IT field for 30 years and am not now nor have ever been a "fun loving criminal". I do not hire people who are nor do I condone or allow any behavior that is not legal or ethical. "Secret worker teams"??? WHAT RUBBISH!!! This is not a spy novel. Get real and with the program.

artanbori
artanbori

i hear you but have tried all sorts and usually come a cropper at some point the IT core is heavily corrupted by fun loving criminals - what can you do it's up to bosses to keep their best workers and bosses right now are feeling the pinch - why? because they are rubbish at getting to crux of the matter - they do not wish to appear unpopular and most intelligent performers are not the kind to winge and complain behind the back - leaving the field wide open for more skillful players to make the home runs the only answer i can see is for some agencies or new business to set up secret worker business teams - like secret shoppers on a longer time scale to train then work on the floor and report straight back to head office as to how the customer and the workers are really being served

MajorGood
MajorGood

Sometimes to benefit the entire team you have to deal with these petty situations. If its happening to you its probably happening to others too. Also have you ever noticed we don't get paid as a team or get rated as a team so sometimes you have to look out for #1

torovictim
torovictim

Many in management simply deny the problem or think it's funny, don't even care what it's costing the company. That's the real problem.

rkanderson
rkanderson

I used to work for a gov't org that ran numerous summer projects with temp employees. One year, a project team leader informed me that a particular temp wasn't pulling her weight. This person attempted the sabotage routines described elsewhere, even threatening me. I did my best to determine what was really going on, and decided she was the problem person, not the other temps. When she threatened to call the division chief and report me for not acting on her behalf, I gave her the division chief's phone number and told her go ahead and call him. I phoned him myself and told him what I had determined by interviewing the team personnel. Since I had years of reasonably successful project administration (helps if you are questioned), I let the division chief's knowledge of my abilities settle things. As far as I know this problem person never called him up (I called her bluff as it were). After the project ended, this problem employee applied for a permanent state job, with an agency that had been a co-sponsor of the project she worked on under me. The agency called me up to see what I thought of this person. Apparently her bad behavior had become evident even to them (whatever she said in an interview or on her job application I don't know, but maybe that tipped them off, or the state interviewer called other team members on my project). I merely confirmed their suspicions, and wherever that problem person went, she wasn't hired by that state! Some people's misbehavior and psychological ineptitude are obvious enough that experienced interviewers can smell a rat and do some investigation. It it is a surprise that back-stabbers, whiners and blamers get jobs anywhere. Many have to job-hop to earn a living. You hope *some* of these kinds of people are eventually confronted by someone with authority (or at least powers of persuasion) to make them get counseling, but I imagine that doesn't happen much. Pity the poor dude that married that woman, if she ever got married. Manipulative monsters rarely restrict their behavior to work. It ends up in their personal relationships, too. Seems they are miserable and insecure, and their mission in life is to make everyone else miserable and insecure, too. Yuck.

trimac06
trimac06

Calling them out in public will definitely let them know that you are willing to stand up to them, and they will think twice about their actions. It boggles my mind that supervisors and CEO's think these types of things will never happen to them. They obviously have not heard of Identity Theft.

nolandbay
nolandbay

This has been my experience Calling the game can be dangerous for your career but so can caving in to workplace bullies. I held a senior position and had a supervisor who adopted a "scatter gun" approach work allocation. After many threats from him while trying to make rational explanations I adopted the policy of doing exactly what he wanted exactly when he told me. With this all documented he was unable to blame me for the department failures. He was eventually moved on but it cost me a promotion. I am still in work and he is not. In the present economic climate this is a good outcome.

torovictim
torovictim

but we live in a real one and management reacts to your suggestions by labeling you a whiner - they don't have the imagination or foresight to see beyond that.

torovictim
torovictim

Again, this is a job in itself; who will be doing the actual work? Now the perp is not only wasting all her time, but all of yours too.

mazinoz
mazinoz

Exactly, sometimes you are presented with a fait de complie, and are not even given a chance to defend yourself. If possible seek redress as soon as possible!

jhorton
jhorton

Anytime, and I do mean ANYTIME, you have a showdown at the I'm OK, You're Not Corral, it will backfire miserably on you. Yeah, you may actually "get" the other person, but I can guarantee that you will pay twice as heavily as they. The secret is to document, document, document. Once a consistent pattern of behavior appears and you have enough evidence that is tangible (this is not the schoolyard, so leave the emotion out, please), take to your supervisor or, if they are part of the problem, their supervisor, right up through the chain of command. When you do this, expect repercussions, some of which may not be positive. Do not think for a second that I advocate laying back and taking what is thrown at you. Just realize that you may pay anyway.

juntunen
juntunen

Using back door methods only makes yourself look petty and possibly paranoid. When you eventually would use your covert information, the higher-ups will wonder about you, do you do this all the time to everybody that you think has slighted you? Don't be secretive about something in the work place that bothers you, your bosses should be concerned about something that might be affecting your performance/work attitude, especially if it is coming from somewhere that you can't control. Honesty has it's rewards = Respect,Professionalism, and maybe compassion.

Abbicat
Abbicat

YES,AND if you have a clueless Management Team that is not backing you, "Oh she would never DO THAT!" YEAH, RIGHT - good luck!

unellen
unellen

Sometimes the sabotage is so foreign/inconceivable to someone they aren't "standing around watching it happen" they don't even believe it's really happening. Or if the deceiver is really good, they don't know what hit them when it does.

kwoods
kwoods

The person I dealt with just escalated the process and became more secretive. My boss had just become a manager and didn't know how to handle this (she was a user from another dept.). He just wanted me to make her happy - something she did not want. She was successful at getting me removed but I was transferred to another area of IT where I am doing some very cutting edge things and the environment is much less stressful. So, it worked out in the end. And my new boss has her number from previous projects.

daryl
daryl

You really must be careful about conducting survellience at the jobsite, especially if you do not have HR and/or management's approval. It can be used against you in the legal system so you could have way more to lose than your employment.

EdMerc
EdMerc

Eaxactly Ian. I never understood why "victims" of this type of behaviour stand around and watch it happen. In my experience if you call someone out on their actions and call 'em hard, they will think twice the next time. They can only get away with what you let them.

Ian Thurston
Ian Thurston

If someone's sticking the knife in you sweetly, call the game in public, call the game. Describe exactly what you mean with an example, explain how it affects you, and ask what the perpetrator's going to do to change the situation - in public, preferrably at a staff meeting. If that's not available, do it by email. If someone's "stealing your identify", get help from the IT department to secure your machine - if your identity can be stolen this way, so can anyone's, including the CEO.

KSoniat
KSoniat

Two people acting that wouldn't have helped. I always was amazed at her behavior but the length of this thread shows it is not an uncommon problem. She truly thought somehow she was "in the right" and that some wrong had been done her so her behavior was justified. I could not fathom her either, but realized I could out-last her. Also document, document, document - it helped in the long run.

trimac06
trimac06

You are good. It shows though how horrible and calculating this person was. I wonder how she thought she would have gotten a recommendation after all of that?

deneventer
deneventer

Garnishing from this article and its discussion, these types are quite manipulative and always act innocent and sweet. Sometimes people say scathing things as a reaction to a misdeed done to them. Who knows?

duane.kleinhardt
duane.kleinhardt

Sadly, some of them are management... And there are those in management that are so spineless that it's easier to move the victim to another job than it is to confront the villain.

AOS/VS
AOS/VS

They are probably totaly ignorant to what is going on. I have always thought that these people can usually fool management but not their peers.

Certifiable
Certifiable

I've seen a beautifully elegant (heinous) contrivance to smear my name by several co-workers. These people valued their high pay with no demands "programming and Network Admin" jobs, when in reality mostly what they did was social networking. They used subtle rumours to make me look bad and to cast aspersions upon my character. At first they pretended to be my friends buddying up to me and even bringing in food. For years they did very little work and sat there content. Never advancing in their skills and always relying on someone else to do most of their job. After a while that gets old. But without constant certification demands idiot bosses will keep hiring these smoozers. Who qualify on the new "must get along" criteria perfectly at first. While the rest of us burned by their acrid sweet spread grow an aversion to "getting along" with a used car salesman smile on our face. Love this thread.

torovictim
torovictim

I should have called the cops right away but was naive and at first still thought of these people as "friends," and thought it was bad for my own image to "squeal" or rock the boat or make waves. (Turns out they were friends - to each other.) And when I finally had to tell the upper management of The Toro Company about a year later, after putting up with this guy harrassing me, and the humiliation of being sent home to work for my own protection, they did nothing.

bart001fr
bart001fr

and let them handle the problem. If you do this right you can even get the boss in hot water by letting them think it was him who called the law in. After that episode of a posse of narcs investing the place to arrest one individual, you can bet he'll never be allowed to show his face there again. And I thought that since the FBI is a law enforcement agency, and the US has a zero tolerance policy on drugs, they would have done something more concrete about it. You should have taken pictures of him shooting up or whatever and compiled a dossier and then gone to HR about this individual who was actually poisoning the office life of all those around him.

rblevitt1
rblevitt1

I've never ceased to be amazed by the morons who apply double standards or play favorites by excusing bad behavior by some people and punishing other people for the same behavior.

#1 Kenster
#1 Kenster

Unfortunately he also worked in IT and used a different logon account (he did not know my password). The boss just found pictures, etc. Since I had the same access to the IT logon account I was lucky to be able to prove I was not there.

torovictim
torovictim

On my last job this guy I had caught abusing illegal drugs at work actually removed the cmos battery from my computer to get past the password and sabotage my computer while the boss and I were on Christmas break. Naturally I knew right away when I got back, but the boss still didn't fire him.

torovictim
torovictim

"Management has a responsibility to keep these people from been hired into their departments, or to actually detect them and getting them out." - That's the real trouble, management is completely irresponsible, at least in the last 3 companies I worked for - or is it a nationwide epidemic? Anyway, I don't like you suggestion of sinking to the level of what you describe as sub-human beasts, though leaving an anonymous note seems tame compared to what they do. But I suggest leaving the anonymous note - or something that will get them in more trouble - hidden in your own desk, where they will only find it when they are snooping where they shouldn't be.

homiyar100
homiyar100

Hi Kenstar, Always remember to creat your Password for your computer wether you are working in your offfice or home because your computer is your Asset. If you have kept your password he would not have opened your computer and visisted sexually oriented website. Or he would not have the access to your computer and after living for home or any where you change your password everytime and everyday so no one can access your computer. This is the first point which you have to remember. Homiyar T Sukhia.

mazinoz
mazinoz

I agree 100% with what you have said, but I would try to raise the matter with your supervisor,manager. Sometimes they are genuinely being led astray and also like you are honest and haven't considered that people can be so devious and evil.

ZTedster
ZTedster

Our tax dollars hard at work.

pulseman2
pulseman2

Having been in the work force for 40 years I have been expose to these individuals quite a few times. Not once in a job was I spared. Decent men and women have a hard time recognizing these degraded sub-humans beasts, as decent men and women do not have impulses to willfully and covertly harm others. These individuals are criminals, and the more intelligent the more dangerous. But how do you recognize such sub-humans? Their acts give them away. Do not judge anyone except only by his deeds, and do not doubt your instincts. After a short or long time the pattern will emerge. How do you handle them? Well your choices are: run away, stay put and let them destroy you, or what I recommend use the same techniques on them. Never openly confront them as you will loose your vantage point. Some are such cowards that when they realize you are not an easy pray, will turn away and look for another victim. I love getting them in trouble, payback is sweet. An anonymous note on their desk saying " I know who you are and what you are doing" will send them into a spin to the point of getting sick. If they are sick then they are not hurting anyone. Evil can only prosper when decent men don't do anything about it. The only justice there is, is the one you can get for yourself. Management has a responsibility to keep these people from been hired into their departments, or to actually detect them and getting them out. However many do not know the above or pretend to ignore it, or do not want to bother with it. They cause unnecessary pain and suffering and are disruptive to a business.

bloom2sb
bloom2sb

I would also schedule an appointment with the labor manager of your company to discuss your concerns. This allows you to post to your employement record your concern, and if the concerns are noticable, and or violate the law action will have to be taken.

bloom2sb
bloom2sb

Wikipedia describes this as "Passive-aggressive behavior is passive, sometimes obstructionist resistance to following through with expectations in interpersonal or occupational situations. It can manifest itself as learned helplessness, procrastination, stubbornness, resentment, sullenness, or deliberate/repeated failure to accomplish requested tasks for which one is (often explicitly) responsible. It is a defense mechanism, and (more often than not) only partly conscious. For example a worker asked to organize a meeting might happily agree, but will then take so long on each task in the process and offer excuses such as calls not being returned or that the computer is too slow, that things aren't ready when the meeting is due to start. A colleague is forced to hurriedly complete the task, or the meeting is postponed."

mattie289404
mattie289404

I hear that term a lot, exactly what is a passive-agressive act or psycological pattern?

torovictim
torovictim

After being victimized by these people several times I've finally learned that all your suggestions are necessary. But the problem is - all that amounts to another full time job. Who, while trying be a conscientious employee themselves, has time to keep journals, gather evidence, meet with lawyers, meet with a boss who probably thinks your just whining? And in my last situation where the boss actually admitted he was aware of the other employee's drug abuse and verbal abuse of me, instead of firing the other employee, he made me work at home "for your own protection," even over my objections (mainly because I would out of touch). In 20-30 hindsight, that was the time to look for another job, but at the time I felt too stressed out from dealing with the whole situation and let them eventually railroad me out (they said the whole branch was being closed down and laid me off - but no one else got laid off and the branch is still there, just one more lie).

mazinoz
mazinoz

1. Watch them very closely. With luck they will get careless and you will be able to prove what they are doing. They may even be doing something they don't want you to know, eg: lying about their whereabouts when they are supposed to be working. By attacking you they are defending themselves against scrutiny. 2. Keep a journal of dates, events, what they said, take a dictaphone to discussions with employer. 3. Ask to be given the details or examples of any complaint made against you. Say you want a right of reply. 4. If they sabotage your work itself show a supervisor what was done if at all possible, as soon as it happens. 5. This may not be the first time this person has acted this way, management may be already wondering about them. 6. Look for a better job if at all possible, difficult I know but it is easier to find a new job when already employed. 7. Hire a lawyer, legal aid, friends or family who are legal professionals. 8. Complain to Industrial Relations, unions. But do everything in your power to stand up to them, because the longer it goes on the worse it will get. This may be a good thing though if you are gathering evidence to hang them with.

nicole.romeo
nicole.romeo

How exactly do so many IT people allow others to log into their system when they are not at work? A simple securtiy application would have prevented many of these occurances.

rblevitt1
rblevitt1

Questions: (1) Is the party who felt she was harassed is still working there? (2) Is the company still in business? (3) Are YOU still working there ( :-) on this one)?

F4A6Pilot
F4A6Pilot

The Sci-Fi book club at an IT facility was reading about L.E.Modestitt's Recluse saga's. There are about 15 of them. There was a less than attractive 300 lb woman who felt that she was being harrassed by these 15 guys who were always talking about Recluse. By the way Recluse was her maiden name. She assumed that the whole book club was harrassing her when we didn't even know her name was Recluse. Nine men were either fired or moved to other contracts if they were contractors, but HR never asked, they only acted and tried to put the men involved into compromising situations. The company rid itself of valuable employees until I stood up to the charges when levied at me.

zsamz
zsamz

Actually video surveillance is not illegal. Unfortunately. However audio surveillance is, unless at least one party is aware that they are being recorded.

rblevitt1
rblevitt1

Way to go! Reminds me of a story I once heard regarding a blind man who was reported for staring at one of his female coworkers. They initially dismissed it after talking to the woman and pointing out the man was blind; after doing some checking, they found out she had a history of filing false sexual harassment complaints. She was gone in 24 hours.

daryl
daryl

That was some great sleuthing, however you were very lucky to not have been fired for performing video survellience without notification (unless that policy is already in force there and employees are notified in writing). Glad you caught her in the act though!