IT Employment

Dice: No gender gap in tech

According to a recent Dice report, the compensation gender gap in tech has disappeared.

The most recent Dice Salary Survey reaffirms something their previous analyses have said since 2009: With tech workers, the compensation gender gap has disappeared. Average salaries are equal for male and female tech pros, provided we're comparing equal levels of experience and education and parallel job titles.

"When it comes to technology employment, it's a skills driven marketplace," said Tom Silver, SVP, Dice. "The ability to apply that know-how to a given problem remains the core of employment - why tech professionals get hired and how they are compensated."

While men out-earned women overall in the 2013-2012 survey - by an average annual income of $95,929 to $87,527 - that difference is driven by the fact that the two groups tend to hold different positions.

Here's the breakdown on top five positions held by both genders:

What is your take on tech salaries based on gender?

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

5 comments
tdenning1
tdenning1

As a female systems admin...I can almost guarantee that I make a lot less than my male predecessors.

MissDorkness
MissDorkness

I run a salary survey for design professionals every year and started looking into the gender wage gap when I took on the role. The 'gap' has ranged from about 17% (during the strong construction and manufacturing periods) down to about 10% (during the depths of the recession), but, averages out to about a 12% difference. However, as Nrkoon mentions, the position gap is one thing to point out. I get so irritated when I hear the 'women make 73 cents on the dollar' or whatever because it's comparing apples to oranges. If we want to decrease that big glossy number, we have to start breaking down the data and seeing where we can change perspective and educational initiatives. And, tdt67, I would have liked to have seen the data as well for a number of reasons. But, I also understand that the original article was a summary of only a section of that survey. They've got other articles and likely reports that reflect the data within it. http://media.dice.com/report/2013-2012-dice-salary-survey/ In the salary survey I mentioned, I could not conclusively prove that there WAS a wage gap. When comparing the pay, men were higher on average, but, women worked fewer hours and had better benefits packages. Unfortunately, due to my small dataset, I couldn't get too granular in my comparisons. If I just tried to find all of the architects who worked on commercial projects who had a four year degree and 5-10 years of experience... I'd sometimes find myself with no women at all or such a crazy small sample size that there's nothing statistically significant about any of it. Of course, whether there's a 'problem' just because there are more women in Interior Design than Industrial Design or because there are more women in Facilities Engineering than there are in Programming is a whole different issue.

nrkoon
nrkoon

As far as I can tell, what this article says is that there is a position gap, which in itself creates a salary gap. While it may be true that for equal job titles there are equal salaries, the fact that the top jobs held by women are those with lower saleries confirms a gap.

tdt67
tdt67

There may be truth in salaries equal, but this article doesn't show it, which is a curious thing, why state that, yet not show the evidence? There isn't a true comparison here. Showing an image with women, men, then job titles that are completely different is no evidence. In addition, stating $8400 gap in pay as being OK because of the job titles is no evidence. I want to see the pay for each of those jobs for men & women with that exact job title, experience, etc. Where's that data? Without it, it seems the truth is trying to be hidden, why else would it not be shown? What this did show, the gap is in the job types. Software engineers, men dominate that area which is ok. What are women in that field (there are some out there) making compared to men? Goes back to my main point: Show the real data, the "exact" comparisons.

GSG
GSG

Yahoo aside, most IT organizations have a culture that allows, or even encourages working from home. Could this have something to do with it? I know that even though we cannot work from home on a regular basis, that we are allowed to work from home if we have a sick child, weather issues prevent us from coming to work, etc... In the past, the perception was that if the kids were sick, it was the woman who took off work, but now, with the ability to work from home, I see more that the mom and the dad are taking turns and are still able to stay productive. If you look at the graphic with the types of jobs, I know a lot of those can be done from home. In fact, most of the vendor project managers that I work with are women, and while they may be headquartered in one place, they actually may live many miles away. For example, I worked with one PM who was headquartered in Philadelphia, but lives in Dallas, and I just completed a big upgrade where the PM was Headquartered in Canada and lives in the US, but works world wide.