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Dice reports top five emerging tech skills

The July issue of the Dice report reveals, among other things, the top searches of emerging skills by hiring managers in the Dice resume database.

The July issue of the Dice report reveals, among other things, the top searches of emerging skills by hiring managers in the Dice resume database. The top five skills are:

  1. iRise--an enterprise visualization platform used to quickly assemble working previews of business software that mimic the exact look, feel and behavior of the final product before any coding.
  2. COTS--Commercial Off The Shelf technology. Embedded COTS technology is used in a number of computer systems across a broad range of military and government applications.
  3. Crystal SDK--a service joining the increasingly crowded social network market for iPhone games.
  4. PeopleSoft Security--that provides an agency with a well-documented, defendable user access security model.
  5. NetApp--an integrated solution that enables storage, delivery, and management of network data and content

To download the entire Dice report, click here.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

8 comments
ITsupportCOC
ITsupportCOC

One thing I have found to be super scarce in almost all areas--espc IT--are research skills. I dont know if it is just laziness or stupidity or both. Takes just as much time (probably more) for someone to wait until the problem is so bad before they take an hour to tell what the problem is than it would have to hop on the NerdNet, Google the problem and at least "TRY" to figure out the questions/problem/issue.

pflapham-23737826629493199154303227527571
pflapham-23737826629493199154303227527571

I've been an iRise man for a couple of years now. Yes, the market is exploding for iRise opportunities. I get job offers every month. However, in my experience, most companies do not realize/understand what they're getting into. Over the years, I've worked at companies, including a fortune 100, that tried implementing iRise into their software development. They brought in iRise to help expedite software development. They didn't understand the cultural changes necessary to utilize its strengths. To Managers, I've likened iRise to *An interactive powerpoint presentation on steroids. NOTHING MORE.* Yes, of course it's MUCH more, but most managers SHOULDNt know that. If they do, they instantly forget the the 1st statement. The kicker is, that the screen mocking and pseudo interactivity is fantastic, and it makes things seem *already built and good to go!* Then management wonders why the department still wants months to develop the application. BE WARNED. Also, iRise is a very Agile/SCRUMcentric tool. A team made up of representatives from SME,BA,DBA,TA, Developers, etc, must constantly review the iRise mocks, TOGETHER, THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT. Typical waterfall development & silo departmentalization pulls the rug out from iRise based projects. BE WARNED. Remember, the company's accounting practices determines which style of development gets done. Traditional accounting protocols created the waterfall scenario. Agile/SCRUM development generates different measurements -- different numbers -- thus the accounting methods MUST be in place to track them correctly. Otherwise, the numbers WILL *look* wrong (or worse). So the accounting will revert to what is *tried and true* and iRise will become a memory. BE WARNED. Managers are measured by the numbers that accounting demands. Again, iRise is a wonderful tool. It's extremely powerful and flexible. But be careful. Have your corporate iRise Champions well-trained and in place BEFORE launching into iRise projects. Have your accounting protocols updated, well-understood, and in place BEFORE launching into iRise projects. iRise demands corporate cultural changes. Especially the accounting and Success Management policies. Whew! :) FWIW, an interesting favorite book *The Goal* by Goldratt, illustrates the type of corporate cultural changes, and measurements, you might run into.

Rodeny56
Rodeny56

I paid $32.67 for a XBOX 360 and my mom got a 17 inch Toshiba laptop for $94.83 being delivered to our house tomorrow by FedEX. I will never again pay expensive retail prices at stores. I even sold a 46 inch HDTV to my boss for $650 and it only cost me $52.78 to get. Here is the website we using to get all this stuff, BidsNew.com

Dan Henry
Dan Henry

I suppose if recruiters are searching for it, it qualifies as a skill - or maybe just another buzzword for your CV.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

The fact that are too busy runing around firefighting, coupled with Research being see as not adding the bottom line would ghve nothing to do with it. My department is called Research and Developement, I've been in it six years and sat through six management do nothings sessions called putting the R back in R & D, doubt it's much different anywhere else... Try again...

Jemonaco
Jemonaco

pflapham -- I like Goldratt too. The problem with agile is that people using it need to understand its strengths, weaknesses, and risks. One advantage that the waterfall faces in achieving success is that the program will be fully funded according to (at least) the original plan. When resource availability and recognized commitment (priority) is so "dynamic" as is often observed, a project's life-cycle reduces to "now you see it, now you don't". Only when an organization can leverage vision, courage, and determination is continuing success possible. That takes the coordination of people, tools, and methods. That requires leadership- not management - which is rare today.

wzrobin
wzrobin

Very nice write up to help those of us in the real world. Thanks!