CXO

Don't expect these five high-tech skills to bring you more money

If pay rate for a skill is any indication of its value, there are some IT skills that look to be well on their way to extinction. A recent piece from Network World listed the five high-tech skills that don't command the pay that they once did. Here's the rundown on the five skills.

If pay rate for a skill is any indication of its value, there are some IT skills that look to be well on their way to extinction. A recent piece from Network World listed the five high-tech skills that don't command the pay that they once did:

1. Plain old HTML

The article says that the demand for skills in HTML programming is declining as companies start to embrace Web 2.0 technologies.

2. Legacy programming languages

Skills centered around programming languages such as Cobol, Fortran, PowerBuilder, and more, don't rate as highly as they once did. In fact, the article quotes recent research by Foote Partners IT, which revealed that Cobol, PowerBuilder, and Jini noncertified skills were among the lowest-paying skills in the second half of 2007.

3. NetWare

Research quoted in the article seems to bear out that Windows Server and Linux skills have either replaced, or are replacing, NetWare skills in terms of demand.

4. Non-IP network

IP and Internet skills have usurped non-IP network expertise.

5. PC tech support

According to the article:

CompTIA surveyed 3,578 IT hiring managers to learn which skills would grow in importance over time and the industry organization found: "The skill area expected to decline the most in importance is hardware."

Foote Partners' research separately showed an 11.1% decline in pay over the last six months of 2007 for ITIL skills, which are often put in place to streamline IT service management and help desk efforts.

Is this news? Do you agree or disagree?

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

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