IT Employment

EEOC releases regulations on what qualifies as a disability

On March 24, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released regulations on what qualifies as a "disability" and what constitutes adequate protection of individuals under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADA) of 2008.

On March 24, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released regulations on what qualifies as a "disability" and what constitutes adequate protection of individuals under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADA) of 2008.

The regulations are designed to better outline what constitutes a "disability" and how those are protected under the 2008 law that modified the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.

The EEOC released a statement saying that, like the original disability law, regulations for the ADA Amendments Act make it clear that not every impairment constitutes a disability. The regulations include examples of impairments that should easily be concluded to be disabilities, however, such as HIV infection, diabetes, epilepsy and bipolar disorder, according to the commission.

To learn more about this, click here.

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Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

4 comments
Questor1
Questor1

The ADA Act of 2008 is definitely a step forward, but the hard facts remain that discrimination on the job in IT is hard to prove. Most State governments in the USA allow "At Will Employment" where the employer can hire or fire any employee or any legal reason at any time. Proving discrimination can be very difficult because the employer will invent some other excuse why the employee had to be fired... ie lack of work, company reorganization, job non-performance, lack of education, etc. For better or worse, the ADA Act of 2008 tries to encourage more mediation between the IT employer and IT employee so legal disputes do not tie up and clog the judicial court system. Unfortunately, IT employers have a legal way to circumvent legal protections granted by the ADA... Companies now try to outsource IT jobs to other companies because contractors are not granted the same level of on-the-job legal protections, wages, and benefits at a client worksite as employees. IT Contractors are easier to hire/fire than IT employees because the threat of a contractor losing a services contract for contract non-performance can be related to ADA disabilities.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I work IT and need protection from the Company Owners who see me as an Expense not a Cost Saver. ;) Col

isalazar
isalazar

The article doesn't really provide any information and the link takes you to articles from 2008, not new information. Is there something missing here?

WordHints7
WordHints7

Read the article, it's clear cut. And the link takes you to EEOC's website for the 2008 ACT, not news articles. An Act is not updated every year, so the link provided is the latest out there. When I saw you comment, it made me think that you are complaining without a reason.

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