IT Employment

Five states to watch in growing tech employment

Most people look at the big players in the tech market when looking for jobs--California, New York, etc. Here are five other states to watch.

When it comes to tech employment, there are a few varsity players--California, Virginia, Texas, New York and Florida. But according to the most recent employment report from Dice, other states are getting into the game. Here are the five states that will be growing their tech workforce in the coming months:

  • Maryland is leading the growth, up nearly six percent in 2012. Expect to see a rise in demand for tech pros in defense contracting, biotechnology and healthcare services companies.
  • In Massachusetts, tech professionals will find more than 3,500 tech job postings on any given day, up 12 percent year over year.
  • Minnesota's technology association (mhta) has set its sights are making its state one of the country's top-five technology states by 2020. And the hiring for IT pros in non-tech companies-like retailers, insurance companies and manufacturers--is up and expected to stay there.
  • Oregon had a nearly four percent growth in 2012. Its mobile software and open source communities are considered to be world class. Also to be considered: The average tech salary in Oregon is greater than $80,000, and even higher in software and chip development.
  • Utah--While the tech workforce isn't huge, other factors boost its growth rate. The state over-indexes in software at close to 1.5 times the national rate, according to Utah Governor's Office of Economic Development. According to Dice, the closer to the application - the faster the growth. Start-up to watch: Domo, a business intelligence company, based in American Fork.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

19 comments
mbrown
mbrown

Oregon, especially Portland metro, has a huge need for experienced IT and Engineering folks...however, please acquire a job before you move here, we have enough unemployed people already!

dba88
dba88

There's very, very little in the St. Louis area!! Companies pay nothing and will hold out for months on fair hourly rates and they come down to something rediculously low. It's shameful, but they get away with it because someone will eventually take the job or consulting gig, because they simply need the work. The ratio of H1Bs and L1s are also extremely high and seriously contribute to the displacement of American IT professionals in the area. HR departments play it very smart in this town! I assume this scenario is played out in many cities across the country, and worse in some cities, and a bit less severe in others, presumably east coast. What's it like in your local area?? Is it conservative or liberal?? Is there a "good ole boy" network?? What can we do to fight back??

cybershooters
cybershooters

Surprised Colorado isn't on there. I deal with a lot of people in Colorado and there seem to be lots of job listings. Popular place to put data centers because of the central location.

playzona
playzona

I consider myself lucky I ride my Bicycle to work, and for me I think California has many IT positions that need to fell up. I had many offers but my current is only 7 Miles from my home.

atlmann10
atlmann10

I would say there is growth in GA of course I have been here (for most of my life I have lived here) and in IT for 19 years and now generally work for myself. I am however interviewing with a company (which is a new technology implementation company) and am on stage 3 hopeful to hear a final by the end of the month. The thing about GA is much of it has always seemed to be hidden which is strange and I have never understood it. Anyway there is a lot in telecom a lot in networking hardware and software of course a ton in support as well. Alpharetta (Directly North of Atlanta 26.4 miles) specifically seems to have a lot of concentration. Of course they are all over. For some reason also in GA it always is separated where as say LA and all the little surrounding cities are generally considered and counted as one in population studies. Where as Atlanta always seems to be counted as a city in the middle of nowhere when the attached Suburb's run 50 miles at least from the center of the city. That's not to mention anyone from North GA on at leas a 50/25 split would say there from Atlanta if someone not local asked where they were from. I know Cobb county where I live has 750,000 residents, I am sure North Fulton has close to if not right on the same, and Dekalb and Gwinette match as well. That is getting off the subject considerably but the thing is companies will say there in Gwinette or Marietta etc and the area is considered Atlanta but not generally counted as Atlanta. The separations statistically messes thing up

BenAthar
BenAthar

I have seen Ga grow a bit as far as IT work goes, It does seems the Atlanta area is becoming a go to city with the busiest airport, average cost of living(depending on where you live) and many things to do unplugged as well. Even in my city south of Atlanta, there has been a growing need for web developers lately as more companies are looking to do their web presence in-house rather than outsource it.

kbennett50
kbennett50

I haven't seen GA with an over abundance of IT jobs. I know some from Ga and they're having a real hard time finding tech jobs in GA. I bet there's 150 applicants for every job posted.

mbaumli
mbaumli

I am actually shocked that neither Missouri nor Kansas were included in your list. Google Fiber will be starting to roll out in September and with the scale of deployment, I would be surprised if there wasn't a business boom in that area. Consider the amount of businesses that want to utilize that bandwidth and how much it will help out media companies for that region. I see Kansas and Missouri showing up everyone on this list for industry growth.

Greenknight_z
Greenknight_z

I thought it was kind of funny - the intro to this story talks about states that are "getting into the game", and Oregon is on the list. Oregon's been a player in high tech for a long, long time. Nice to hear the jobs are coming back, though.

yodi.collins
yodi.collins

There's no H1B for IT work in this area anymore. You have to be a US citizen.

BobRouseAtl
BobRouseAtl

I lived and worked in the north and NE Atlanta suburbs for 30 years. The IT industry there exploded in the 90s and continued to grow for the next 10 years. I lost my job in the economic crash of 2008. There was nothing for months. After 8 months of applying and getting few replies and fewer interviews, I found a job in the DC area (which includes the MD mentioned in the original article, plus northern VA). I think GA has seen it's fortunes rise and fall. Perhaps they are on the rise again, but I agree with another poster's comments that there are way more applicants than available jobs.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Atlanta has the busiest airport in terms of passengers. The busiest airport in terms of flights is Memphis, with all of FedEx's traffic.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

The list is based on what Dice is seeing right now. The surprise for me would be if certain states appeared on that list: SC, Mississippi, Alabama...

hippiekarl
hippiekarl

(I said 'n/t'); stop looking here.....

bobc4012
bobc4012

There are a lot of technology jobs in NC, VA and, even, Atlanta (GA). In NC, you have Charlotte with its banking industry, the RTP (Raleigh) area with the technology, drug and medical industries, in VA (around the DC area - just as in Maryland). Atlanta is still doing quite decent. It just depends on what business articles you read. One will say a certain area is in the top 10 of something and a different business article in a competing magazine, paper, etc. will say different areas are in that same business top 10.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Nick and I's point was that the Deep South is NOT a hot bed of technology jobs. Besides, Florida isn't part of 'The South'. It's either the seventh New England state or the sixth borough of NYC :D

mckinnej
mckinnej

You're not going far enough south. We're doing fine here in FL. You don't have to live in Miami or Tampa either. Cost of living is low and my morning commute is under 5 minutes. (Yes, that's a "five".) We'll be hiring more folks soon too.

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