Social Enterprise

Help prospective employers find you

How do recruiters find you? Primarily through your online presence. Here are some tips from a recruiter for making yourself more visible on the Web.

How do recruiters find you? Primarily through your online presence. Here are some tips from a recruiter for making yourself more visible on the Web.

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Kelly Dingee, a recruiter, posted an article on fistfuloftalent.com that offers great suggestions for getting yourself out there to recruiters and potential employers. Here are some of her tips:

1. Post your resume on more than one site and then create a free gmail account for managing your job search and/or networking and to cut down on the spam you are sure to receive.

2. Build profiles on LinkedIn, Naymz, Plaxo, etc. Dingee suggests making your profiles public because many employers don't pay to use II's recruiter module, opting instead for free techniques like XRay to find people. If you use MySpace and Facebook, be careful that you don't post inappropriate stuff.

3. Put yourself out there (online) with Pipl.com. Dingee says that Pipl, a people search engine, is so good that it will "probably scare some people's pants off when they see what information it is able to legally drudge up." The word-of-mouth on Pipl is so good that it leads in the U.S. with 557K unique users. That's compared to Spock's 260K. Pipl produces not only links to all of your profiles on social networks like Facebook and LinkedIn, but it includes blog mentions and photos on Flickr. Be forewarned that it also finds mentions of your name in public records. This would not be a problem unless, as it was in my case, your name is shared by an inmate at the Alabama Department of Corrections.

Pipl also finds e-mail addresses and summarizes "quick facts" about a person. It does this by crawling the "Deep Web." According to Roi Carthy of TechCrunch, a general purpose search engine typically crawls the Web by following links to URLs found in other pages. By contrast, the Deep Web is made up of pages that no other pages link to. Dynamic pages are a good example of these sorts of pages. This means that if an engine wants to index pages located in Deep Web repositories it has to "guess" possible URLs. Just how big is the Deep Web? No one really knows, but it's generally accepted that it is vastly greater (orders of magnitude greater) than the Surface Web--the pages which are easily indexed by search engines.

4. Try LookupPage, a free online service that lets you create a personal webpage that aims at representing you professionally online and is visible to all search engines.

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About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

6 comments
bgallmeister
bgallmeister

This was an informative article on how to get one's name out on some interesting search engines. I'll definitely check out pipl this evening. I blogged recently at http://geekwhisperer.blogspot.com/2009/02/its-network.html on the topic of building your personal network; I think my comments are complementary to the hints offered here.

SObaldrick
SObaldrick

Agreed with comments about Pipl, I get better results with Yahoo or Google. Yes, you are going to get a lot of spam, but with gmail, I don't see that you need to create a new account. You are going to have to wade through the spam anyway. gmail does a pretty good job of filtering it out. I post my normal email address in my job searches. Have not noticed a significant increase in spam since I started job searching. Finally, not impressed with lookuppage .. this is the message I received when I tried to sign up: 'The server is temporarily unable to service your request due to maintenance downtime or capacity problems. Please try again later.' Les.

PMPsicle
PMPsicle

There's no question that being found by a knowledgeable hiring manager is a better method than simply applying to that manager. Unfortunately there are two problems ... First, I did a Pipl.com search on myself, complete with address. I'm not that difficult to find -- true my articles on Techrepublic are several years old but they are there. Google does a half decent job of finding me. Pipl on the other hand, turned me into a black activist from New York, a dead actor (I've lived with that one all my life so I can understand that even if his name is spelt differently), a 28 year old female (uh, no comment on that one), some guy from Portsmouth and a couple of dead guys amongst others. But no me. Well I lie, one me ... my resume .... and it didn't even realize the city was the same. Secondly, in today's IT market, the person who approaches you is often neither a hiring manager nor knowledgeable. Lately, I've been receiving enquiries from headhunters about junior developer jobs in the U.S.. Yes, those are grey hairs and no, Canada is not part of the states (at least, not yet). I have to agree with Osiyo53. Better to become known as a person to go to for answers. Market yourself as an expert in the blogs and q/a areas that your customers frequent. Forget about the Pipl searchers. Glen Ford, PMP http://www.TrainingNOW.ca

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

For me, I like my job. I only am on Linked-In, partly because I don't want to keep up with other sites, but also because I don't want my employer or perspective employer to think I am constantly marketing myself. And I use LinkedIn, not because it is the biggest or best, but because there is a good healthcare presense on the site.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Hmmm, I tried your Pipl.com site and had it look up some names. My own, and some others of folks whom I know well. I don't see it to be much different than doing a Google search. Yah get a LOT of hits, possible matches. But you also get an overwhelming amount of junk. Links to info about somebody ... but it's not the right person. This is useful ... how? A prospective employer is gonna spend how much personal, and valuable time sifting through all that garbage trying to decipher what applies to the person in question as versus junk that belongs to someone else? Even when considering personal web sites intended to reveal certain information about yourself, and to promote/market yourself. I've read more than a few of those where the person to whom the site belonged engaged in some .... uhhhh ... let's call it "exaggeration" as concerns that person's true abilities, experience, and knowledge. I suppose that if using such search engines and their results floats your bubble and makes yah happy and confident that you're really finding out something useful about the "real" person in question ... go ahead. Personally, I pretty much ignore the crap I might read on a Facebook page, or other similar sites. If I bother to read such at all, I put on the hip waders because I know I'm gonna be wading through some major BS piled really high and deep. I find it much more informative to read sites dedicated to discussion and information exchange between professionals in some particular field. Where folks in a particular line of work exchange hints and tips, ask questions about something which has stumped him or her and get helpful answers from others that might know more about that particular subject, etc. I am subscribed to a number of such groups. And if you really do know your business/technical field it does not take long to figure out which members are truly knowledgeable and experienced. Which are somewhat knowledgeable. Which are beginners who are not trying to appear to be anything else ... as versus those who know a little and are trying to appear to know a lot. And which members might have a particular specialty area of knowledge that's far more in depth and complete than is average for the whole group. Etc. In short, yah can pretty readily separate the real deal from the pretenders. For instance, in one such professional discussion group. Members can post a profile which would include professional education, certs, etc and a brief work history. Some of which might actually be true and factual. :-) But then yah can click on a button and call up every post that person ever made on that site, and read what sort of technical questions that person asked, or what sort of technical advice/answer he or she provided to another. And if yah know much about the technical field at all, you can start forming pretty reliable opinions about that person's true knowledge and abilities. On that same site, it is routine for one member, who is hunting up new talent, to ask another to give him a call or email in private. Likewise, it is common that when a person in the group mentions that he or she is job hunting, for whatever reason, for others to tell the person "Check with XYZ company in your area, I know they're looking for someone of your type." For the members who've been hanging around that site for long, most all of them know which other members are "for real", and which are pretending to be more than they are. It's pretty obvious if you browse through a guy's series of posts and are knowledgeable about the subject yourself. In fact, pretty common for someone to ask a specific technical question about a specific piece of equipment or system, for that person to get an answer like, "Hey, ping Don Brown, and ask him specifically. There is no one around here that knows more about that specific item than he does." Picking up random bits and pieces about someone as one does when doing those general searches of the type you mention, will often get yah little more than hype, touting, bogus info that's really about someone else. And a lot of info that is perhaps about the person in question but which is not really relevant to the job in question. Who really cares if "Don Smith" likes raising roses while wearing high, spiked heels? As long as he's not appearing on the job in those heels with a whip in his hand. And keep in mind, a LOT of folks hang around sites, and post things under screen names, as versus their own real name. And what screen name they choose, often varies over time, and may vary just dependent upon what site they're hanging around. I'd hardly trust anything seen on a facebook page, or similar, as being reliable information. Not any more than I trust that everything typed on a Wiki page or personal blog as being wholly factual and true.

mattohare
mattohare

If you want to work locally, look at local adverts for job search places. I have a profile on Monster, but I also have one on a Northern Ireland site. My searches for Northern Ireland on Monster seems to pull a lot of stuff up that would require a move to England. For email addresses, Google mail is not always the best. I have one such email account that I've never given out, and it has been receiving 100s of spam per day from the start. I use Yahoo mail for this with some success.

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