IT Employment

Hiring practices that can frustrate job seekers and hurt a company


Here are my two least favorite hiring practices.

1. Jobs that are posted even though there's already a clear candidate in mind. This happens in situations when a company is required to post positions (under the guise of being fair and equitable) even though the hiring manager already has his or her mind set on a particular person. It's kind of a crappy practice that ultimately just sets the unaware applicant up for a bigger disappointment.

Sometimes hiring managers will word a job description so specifically that you know there is only one person on the face of the earth who could fit it.

If you see job requirements like this, you can be pretty sure something is up:

  • 3 years hands-on experience administering Microsoft Exchange
  • Must be between 5' 8" and 5' 8 1/2"
  • Must drive a Saab

You can either forge ahead and apply, in the hopes that your personal charisma will overcome your "deficits," or you can just take the hint and back off. Something like this happened to me once and I backed off. The hiring manager later pretended to be perplexed as to why I hadn't applied. So if I had it to do over, I'd apply and make him tell me why the specifics he outlined were so crucial to the job. If people are going to be sneaky, make them defend their sneakiness.

2. Managers who hire for specific credentials instead of technical aptitude. I read a great article by IT headhunter Nick Corcodilos who said the reason there are cries of skill shortages in IT is because managers look for candidates who have "done it before" because they don't know how to capitalize on the talents of candidates who haven't. He said,

"These managers fear the learning curve because they can't control it. (Curiously, these same managers seem to have no problem waiting months to find the perfect candidate.) In the job interview, these managers are incapable of identifying the talent that would allow a C++ programmer to quickly master Perl, or a catalog merchandiser to apply her skills to selling stuff on your Web site."

We've all heard about how easy it is to master another foreign language after you've mastered one. To me, IT is the same. If you have the technical aptitude to understand one technology, then you are more capable of picking up another. You just need someone to guide you in the process initially.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

80 comments
dean.owen
dean.owen

As a hiring manager (previous job) I was faced with these scenarios on occasion. The truth of the matter is: I looked at every single resume that came in for any of the positions posted. Any one of them may not be suited for the position posted, but at least I got to see what was out there in the labour pool, and if other opportunities came up - I had a fair idea of where the best candidates were. As a matter of fact, I hired two top performers for positions other than the ones they originally applied for. My advice (and I take it as well) is to apply to any and all jobs - within reason - that you have skills for. No matter how marginal. With today's electronic submission, it doesn't cost anything. It may be frustrating, but remember: you can't win the lottery if you don't buy a ticket.

andy.nelson
andy.nelson

Spot on Dean..... The other point I'd make is that if you are going to use a recruiter/agency that you should make sure they understand your technologies/skills - that way, they can properly fight your corner with prospective employers. There have been literally hundreds of occasions when I have pushed a CV through on the basis of someone having good technical capabilities but perhaps slightly outside the scope of the role as it was originally written. The main problem occurs when the hiring manager is essentially just a specifier and then a gestapo like HR team try to filter applicants for something they have no understanding of, meaning people don't get through for consideration. Like for example the top flight Java developer I worked with recently, who was rejected by a major healthcare company's HR team as his CV didn't have "Java" plastered all over it. Instead it had J2EE, J2ME etc etc..... ;-) In these instances, use your network, find out who is the top dog in a department and make direct contact with them, and for certain, NEVER get in the game of sending your application to generic "careers@xcorp.com"....... Good luck with the search

macghee
macghee

The practice that annoys me the most is where the job poster advertises a position that actually sounds real, but is just an attempt to stockpile resumes in their database so they can shop them around. There's no job. They just want your information so they can say they've got x applicants ready for some position.

andy.nelson
andy.nelson

At the moment, this practice is virulent here in the UK in IT Recruitment. The thing is that over time, the companies playing the game get caught out.....

High_Lander_1
High_Lander_1

NEON, I could not agree more with you. I am surprised that no one has mentioned credit checks companies do to determine someone???s ability to do the job or the demand that a person have there own car, charging them to park it at work or putting signs up about how they are not responsible for what happens to your car on there property, but you must park it in a designated area. I find it funny how a few posters say well if they want certifications just go get them even though you are unemployed and most likely have no money or time for such papers. Any one wanting those certifications can pay a lot of money for a test taking boot camp that specializes in training you to passing those tests. To me, they mean very little. They know a few technical words. One time I had a person with a MCSE and so-on tell a friend that he needed a new computer; in 3 minutes checking the computer I found a screw touching the underside of the harddrive and frame, I removed it and it booted right up. Harddrive did have to be replaced a week later.

Top.Gun
Top.Gun

We have all had to start out with no experience. My point is I was happy to start out at the lowest end of the ladder. I applied myself to all the 'rungs' and got pretty far up. When I hire I get the feeling that some certs think they deserve to start in the middle. Maybe some can but it's not a sure thing. I give as much credit to the 'school of hard knocks' as the paper the certs have. Maybe it's just that years ago there were more entry level positions.

Absolutely
Absolutely

[i]When I hire I get the feeling that some certs think they deserve to start in the middle... Maybe it's just that years ago there were more entry level positions.[/i] Maybe more entry level positions [i]are[/i] being offered to the most qualified applicants, who are hungrier for success. Is it Bill Gates' fault if those applicants are overseas? Was it Lee Iacocca's fault when the same was true in the auto industry? I'm a pretty incorrigible know-it-all type, but I know I have to climb by my efforts, not by resting on my laurels.

t2nm
t2nm

It's not the entry level jobs I'm complaining about. Those should go to the most hungry. But it's when the higher level jobs go to those with certs over those with years of experience it gets discouraging. And don't get me started about the employees overseas. They have shut down many a company here. Not because they are hungrier, but because they work for less. And that is because their country supplements their income in different ways. Well, enough about that. The point here is that those of us who have been around a while have knowledge that can't be taught in a book or in a boot-camp. It's that knowledge that will pull a managers butt outta the fire more often than not.

Absolutely
Absolutely

In IT the requirement is not as formal as in medicine or accounting, for examples, but the importance of certs is not unique to IT. I won't argue that there is any substitute for on-the-job problem-solving experience. But there's nothing wrong with using certification tests to establish a minimum level of proven knowledge. It's a nuisance, but if it's the biggest nuisance in my career, I'll be pretty satisfied.

Top.Gun
Top.Gun

Very true.

Top.Gun
Top.Gun

All Parts. I didn't mean to offend. There are experienced people who also feel they are too good to start at the bottom. Certs are good for for an indication of knowledge level. For me attitude is the most important trait - for experienced people as well as certs.

retro77
retro77

In some cases the manager wants someone who can "work right out of the box", not someone that needs to be taught. Also most managers or IT didnt come up through the ranks in IT. Some came from different departments to pill a position. If you are right fresh out of school, apply for a job that has a large team or people that can mentor you. Dont apply for the job where you are the only IT guy.

t2nm
t2nm

I'm doing Helpdesk and desktop support too. And I've been in this industry for 25 years. I too apply and have not gotten jobs as Admins or Managers. But my point is, it pisses me off to no end to lose out to someone who has NO experience and only some pretty paper they can hang on the wall. I have also lost jobs to someone with experience, but it's a little easier to take than when it's to someone with none. I've been doing desktop support as long as there have been desktops. And I guess I'll keep doing it until someone will take the risk and give me a chance at an Admin type job. I guess I just stay in it 'cause I love the IT industry. And I can't see doing anything else.

ed.hanson
ed.hanson

Its really said, HR and hiring managers take this narrow view. Best career advice I ever got from an old boss and I quote her all the time: "When you are looking for a job and they are asking for 5 things and you meet only 3 things apply anyway. If you get the position you have room to grow and everyone wins. However if you meet all 5 don't apply because you all go crazy and probably quite within 6 months and everyone loses." That was a manager with foresight!

andy.nelson
andy.nelson

Aaah yes, the "2 out of 3 ain't bad" thought process - and if you look a the kind of companies that work like this, they tend to be the ones where the bosses are experts in what the company does, and the person in charge of hiring the staff is the person they'll be working for - i.e someone who can spot potential for the role, NOT someone who just looks for keywords......take note HR people!! Oh sorry, that would make your safe little positions redundant wouldn't it? ;-)

t2nm
t2nm

This is a great Thread. And it's been great reading about how everyone agrees that the system just doesn't work! I just ask that everyone here remembers this when they are in the interviewer's chair. Cert's and degrees are great, but experience will get the job done right! Why do you want someone that can take tests when you can hire someone that has actually done the work? It never makes sense to me. All I know is when I'm interviewing for a position I'm depending on to get the job done, I want someone who's actually done it before!

kpfreelance
kpfreelance

Yes experience matters, but no one was born with the inherent knowledge of how to do a certain job. At some point, you were a "newbie" that had to be trained and brought along slowly. The reason I've been stuck in a crappy desktop support job for so long is because of attitudes like that. Over time I went out on my own & took classes(paid out of my own pocket)& got certified in Novell (CNE) and Cisco(CCNA). Problem is where I work and other network ops jobs I applied for they only wanted people with experience. How the heck can you ever get experience if you never get hired??? Don't tell me to volunteer; I've tried that angle and even that requires experience... I'm sick of desktop support; I've had a belly full of it. I'm capable of far more technically advanced work. I'm tired of being ignored or dismissed.

JamesRL
JamesRL

And they offer no hope, then it is time to sharpen the resume. Not every pasture is greener, but some are. James

kpfreelance
kpfreelance

After another bad week in desktop support-land, it's small wonder. Yes, I'm frustrated at the lack of opportunity, being underutilized and under appreciated over the years. (Particullarly about being out several thousand I spent on classes and certifications in Novell & Cisco. The comapny where I've been working the past 10 years has given me very few opportunites to gain valuable hands-on experience in the LAN/WAN support area even though they know I'm chomping at the bit.) But I have no intention to stop trying. I want to stay in IT, but I'm switching fields -- web services customer technical support. Aside from my present job, I'm currently training in Unix Fundamentals, Webmaster Essentials, Web Server Concepts, HTML, ASP.NET, Dreamweaver, Java and SQL DB/Server Administration. This time I'm spending the money purely for my own gain; not pinning my hopes on what the management of this company may or may not do... Hope that makes things a bit clearer.

vince
vince

it may be time to move on. some employers get "comfortable" with the way their roster is, and rather than move a known good person to an area where their abilities are not "proven," they will hire from outside the department or company. it's stupid, but it's a fact. another suggestion might be to evaluate the way you present your skills. without making it look like you are waiting for a pat on the back, there's nothing wrong with extolling our own virtues.

JamesRL
JamesRL

When you are talking to managers at your employers, you will have a hard time moving up. I've worked in desktop support. I even moved from a job as an independant consultant to a desktop support guy to get my foot in the door at a large corporation. How long have you been in desktop support? Do you do an excellent job? Are you known as a leader, someone who helps your teammates? Do you go beyond the boundaries of your job decsription to help the company? Have you shared your ambitions with your manager? James

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

I have no idea of what you've done or haven't. What I have seen in many people, myself included, is the frustration factor getting you to the point where you stop trying. Just trying to help...

kpfreelance
kpfreelance

I'm not an idiot; except for creating open-source utilities, I did all the above long before you suggested it. And if I have an attitude (I had a lot of help developing it) it's because I've been stuck in desktop support for far too long. And that can't be good for anybody...

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

ditch the attitude. Make friends, network, talk to people, create a few open-source utilities, get your name out there.

Gochoa3664
Gochoa3664

that totally happens all the time where I work no matter what dept you are in. I cant tell you how many sisters, mothers, cousins, best friends, etc have all been hired and/or promoted sole on who they know not WHAT they know and to "justify" the hire/promotion the job description is written specifically to the person in mind. I dont uderstand why they waste EVERYONE'S time? Everyone knows what is going on and those that have tried to rectify the problem by following the process are let go or leave. It is a sad, sad place sometimes.

Top.Gun
Top.Gun

Yes that's true. Certs are not an indicator of the potential for success, but a good way to get in the door. I just wish all felt that way. In a recent interview (I didn't get the job) I was drilled about how I now do things. I feel like I gave them an outline of the proper way to set up and run an IT department only to have a cert get the job to do it. I wondered why they they ran out of pencils writing down everything I said??? Maybe I'm a little biased right now.

json_white
json_white

I have had similar troubles, I'm 3rd generation IT, have 12+ years on the job experience plus 8 more before that as an amatuer/child/dabbler learning from Dad and Grandpa. In reality, there isn't a new technology I can't become proficient in given a week and an expert at given the opportunity to immerse myself. When it comes right down to getting the job, it all adds up to number of years with X and Y. The number of years is so arbitrary anyway. 2 months of building, configuring, tuning, and adapting a technology can be exponentially more valuable that 5 years administering the same technolgy. I'm thinking that there needs to be a middleman to the technical interview process. Not a headhunter, they're just looing at time spent on X like eveybody else. I'm thinking a professional interviewer who can readilly assess a candidates potential for success on a project.

MrjKong
MrjKong

Item #2 is not an issue I have had to confront yet. Item #1 is completely relative to my current situation. For the past three or so years I have been strung along with the promise of the next time a position opens higher in the food chain it is mine. I had been tied to this situation due to circumstances beyond my control. Due to the death of my spouse this is no longer the case. I have been counselled to not make ANY major decisions for the first year of grieving process, which is probably good advice. When the year is up I will be gone from this sinking ship.

mraddison2002
mraddison2002

Response to the Blog Article: Hiring practices that can frustrate job seekers. I thinks this was a great article. In addition to that they also should raise the awareness when a hiring manager or the Company (human resources)interview a potential candidate for an IT position they give you this test without informing the candidate or explain to the candidate what the test will consist of so that the potential candidate can prepare for it properly. I think that is another reason why there is a shortage of finding good candidates for an IT position because a test really doesn't prove anything but that your just a good test taker.

brian.catt
brian.catt

Its really a generic problem whenever the hiring manager is incompetent to make rational judgements about who can best do the job as he/she has limited expertise of their own so clone the last incumbent or worse HR or outsourced HR get the selection/qualifying job with even less idea. Who good wants to reprise a job they just did anyway? Worse still this is now the predominant way to hire with these tick box outsourced recruiters bought in by cost cutting management to improve their short term bonusses. Wonder why corporate business struggles to innovate? Because ignorant corporate managers who can't do and don't understand the jobs they are hiring for hire people with no ambition into jobs they have also done before - because they can and don't care about people or the business, just their job. Isn't it great? Brian

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

"Worse still this is now the predominant way to hire with these tick box outsourced recruiters bought in by cost cutting management to improve their short term bonusses." oh damn that's good stuff

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

30 years of experience working with computers and I loose out to the shmuck that can barely explain what a computer is but has lots of pretty certifications on there resume. I'm a jack of all trades that can focus my skills on what each different possition requires yet the reply comes back; "we're looking someone who specializes in 'blah'" (I can build you a damn server, I'm pretty sure that admining one indavidual deamon of that server is not an issue but I don't have the shanzzy certification to proove it)

lauren.malhoit.ctr
lauren.malhoit.ctr

I understand what you're all saying. The people that have the papers, but nothing to back it up are taking your jobs, etc. However, how does anyone break into the IT workforce when all they have is school experience and no relevant work experience. They go get the certs so that they can somehow get their foot in the door. You can't blame them for that. The original posting was about technical aptitude and talent, not necessarily about experience.

vince
vince

great theory. there is a world of difference between being able to afford to take, then pass a standard test and being able to actually do the work. Technical aptitude and talent are not measured by a piece of paper. They are measured by the work. A standard test is a measure of one's theoretical ability in a given circumstance. In the case of certs, do a google search for "A+ certification sample test" and see how easy it is to pull up oodles of info, meant to give the average Joe a shot at entering the wonderful world of IT. It's not too hard to guess which ones are cert mills. THAT takes away the jobs from the talented, yet unpapered techies out there, in an age when the measure of one's abilities is a $100.00 or more piece of paper.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

But I get what your saying also. Like I said in another of today's rants. I grew up in a small town where jobs came to find me. I then moved to the big city for school (leaving an IT possition to get my degree; irony in the end of it all really). The big city job market isn't even a little like a small town. I'll leave it at that though or I'm going to start telling woulda-shoulda-coulda sobb stories.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

The cert tests are dry, full of theory and quoting things that you can look up in a manual in 30 seconds. they have nothing to do with on-the-job skill or talent.

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

sheesh!

t2nm
t2nm

I agree with Neon. I have over 25 years in the industry and I can't get the jobs I go for over these jerks that have all the certs. I only have an Associate degree because I've been working my A#@ off learning all about the computer world by working in it! And I know what it's like to be passed over for someone they already had earmarked for the job. I wish that they WOULD put the "Special" requirements in the job description. At least that gives you a clue to stay away. But most of the time you walk away from the interview thinking you've aced this one, and the offer should be coming. Then you get the rejection letter in the mail, and you're left scratching your head wondering what happened.

t2nm
t2nm

I got the same response from the interviewers. You have your A+, that's just great! And you have all the qualifications for the job. We'll be calling you back for a second interview. Then a couple weeks later I receive a letter in the mail. I think you know what it said. Yep, "After much deliberation, we have decided on another applicant". Then through the grapevine I find out it was someone's nephew with his MCSE right out of a boot-camp. The funny thing is, he didn't last two months! They just posted the position again. I've yet to decide if I should try again. I probably will. But this time I will go in with a slightly different attitude.

dspeacock
dspeacock

I made the "mistake" many years ago of getting my A+ cert. I already had my CBA and was working on my CBE, but was told that A+ was the coming thing and if you didn't have it, you were not going anywhere. Nowadays, it has been removed from my CV (along with the CBA because nobody uses Banyan anymore) because of the keyword searching headhunters who are looking for an entry level tech, and bombard me with job offers 2000 miles away for $12 an hour. Yes, CompTIA is vendor neutral, and not beholden to any one manufacturer, but the way their certs have been elevated to supposedly represent the acme of proof is mind boggling. I actually had an HR type tell me that even though I have my CISSP and many years of security and audit experience, because I didn't have a Security+ cert, I was not qualified enough for the position. Once headhunters and HR types get their heads out of their collective 4th points of contact, and actually UNDERSTAND what certs mean and require, maybe things will change. Until then though, I'm not going to hold my breath until I turn blue like a smurf. Oh, and don't get me started on people who have BAs and no experience getting hired over people with an AS and experience out the wazzoo, just because they spent another 2 years getting a sheepskin in Advanced Basketweaving.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

My snappy comeback would be; "you joined July 12th and have made only one posting, stick around a while and get to know me before you question my competency." I'm not really looking to offend or posture about claiming to be the most knowledgeable here though. I'm here because there are more knowledgeable people to discuss with and learn from. for all I know, you've been reading the forums for years but just signed in recently. My day job is a business analyst using 10% of my skill to bend Excel and Access to my will. My after hours (recent offer and acceptance) is Root of redundant webservers for small business branching into hosting. In my own time, I collect and learn OS the way other people collect baseball cards. That is when I'm not investigating more security related fun. I know when I'm asking a stupid question. My questions tend to be for humour, conversation or better understanding of the technology I might better use in my daily tasks. I can also tell when a tech just wants you to go for coffee while they fix the machine and get on with there day. My grief right now really is plenty of skill for the job but no fancy paper. Heck, the other day I had the helpdesk guy laughing when I realized that I had made a rather newbie error (as400 terminal, it happens) and explained it too him as a Stupid User Error (PEBCAK, ID-10-T error or whatever you want to call it). Now, I do take a little offense to this bit: "stupid questions from self proclaimed power users like you" You don't know me or have a clew about my skill, knowledge or competency with a computer. Stick around, keep reading and you may realize that I'm far from Johny average user asking tech support how to change a background image or if I can get a different colour desktop chassis. I won't make changes too my system that require the admin password (though that's only a speedbump at best) but I also won't bother a busy tech for anything less then that. You seem to have taken my general comment to personally mean you and that was not my intention. I was speaking of my current situation in general terms not for all tech support staff everywhere. If your a tech who still loves computers after eight hour days of stupid user questions, we'll probably get along very well. I'm one of the shadow IT that lighten your workload and try to better educate the "average business users".

mazinoz
mazinoz

I have had similar experience. With a change of CEO, and due to sexism and office politics the powers that be decided to advertise my job and I had to apply for the job I had been doing for over a year. Went through a sham of an interview and was told that the other candidate - a male who was studying for a MCSE - ie didn't have one was the successful candidate. I believe the CEO thought this meant he was studying for a Masters degree. I said fine in that case I would like to resign as I had been offered another job. The CEO nearly shit herself. They thought I would stay on and train my replacement, right. The new guy starts, my former colleagues 99% male, realise he know NOTHING and complain to the board. They beg me to come back. The moral of the story is look after yourself, and forget loyalty etc. as dishonest arse holes will only use these against you. Also know your stuff. Finally, try to setup a fund of six months salary in case. Apply for better jobs while you are in a job, and constantly update your resume with functional descriptions. This takes work but it is the best option.

spunkygermanicus
spunkygermanicus

and I field all sorts of stupid nonsensical questions all day. Are you sure you didn't ask a stupid question? Perhaps he was too busy to answer it. Perhaps he was too polite to tell you you're an idiot. Perhaps you're not as good as you think you are. I used to be in your boat, except I don't think I'm so damn good. I finished my degree and picked up some certs, and now I'm a workstation techie fielding stupid questions from self proclaimed power users like you, I often wonder if it's worth it.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I ask our workstation techie a simple question and usually get a look like; "What?. Was that even english?"

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

That was the bit of math that keeps kicking me in the teeth. The general response to getting my A+ has been; "Good for you. We want someone who specializes in [blah] technology" Anyone I work with can't figure out why I'm not working in the IT department. Those I talk to in IT asks why I'm not already working for them. Anyone in HR I talk to sends me back a response like; "so your interested in moving to IT and want to know what to take in school?" - Nope, I'm trying to *return* to the IT industry, have more skills in my left toe than most care to obtain in a lifetime (It's the subject I study obsessively as a hobby) and can learn whatever you want me to "specialize" in over the initial week of training plus a weekend of reading from my own sources. That's the end of my rant/venting for now. I miss the small town job market where finding work was usually "hey, you know computers right? send me a resume and we'll talk next week. I got a possition open."

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I started the hobby a while ago of collecting CompTIA certs. I figure eventually I'll have all the usless bling that HR loves to see. The certs may even catch up to my actual skill level but it's ongoing what with paying for them myself with very little expendable family budget. A+ was a simplistic read and great fun to write in chronological order. - read the exam prep text finding about 1% new information - arrived on time to write the exame dressed fashionably in tshirt and shorts with skateboard under arm (really the best way to travel short distances even if your 30). - got a look like ?Are you serious? Are you even in the right place?? - presented my testing number, started the questions and finished in about twenty minutes - got a look like ?ok, let?s see how bad this kid screwed up.. he wasn?t in there long enough to finish? - The results came off the printer, the attendant looked at them then at me; ?so you coming back tomorrow to write the next one?? I love showing up to things like that in my causal gear and board. If appearance isn?t part of the occasion, it?s much more fun to show up completely out of place then simply and quietly blow everyone away by being off the chart in the test or fixing something with two or three commands. I was going to follow with Network+ and Server+ but at the time it seemed no one was recognizing the certs. I guess it just wasn?t the MCSE of that year. Last week I read through the Security+ prep text and picked up about 30% new information. It was a good read and much less challenging than expected so I'll be skipping Net+ and Serv+ to simply write Security+. That'll be another 250$ cert and hopefully its high enough up the food chain that it'll be of any use to me. The question remains; Anyone in the Toronto area actual recognize CompTIA? Somehow it just seems completely wrong to be writing a cert from the product vender like the MSCE certs. I'd much rather have a third party cert that says I know how to use the redmond junk or better still, a product neutral cert that says I know the tech and concepts regardless of cheesy branding or descriptive buzzword. Thank goodness for FOSS where license fees are not a limitation to education.

vince
vince

being a tech of various abilities for about 10 years now, learning as i had to fix my booboos. having to work to support a family means no letters with my name saying i know what the hell i am doing. so a newly aquired single friend of mine goes ahead and gets some certs for his fine ability to troubleshoot, diagnose, repair, etc. of course, he gets the job we both interview for for field service. and of course who does he call when he can't figure some problem? yeah, you guessed it. that sort of crap has always bugged me. an idiot can prep for a paper course. doesn't mean the idiot actually knows what the hell he/she is doing.

kpfreelance
kpfreelance

I got a cert or 2 (CNE & CCNA) and have many years of practicle experience and the manager still went out & hired from the outside... Fat lot of good that did.

Top.Gun
Top.Gun

With over 30 years experience (and no certs) I'm always amazed that I have to show these "certified professionals" how to do things.

BigFun
BigFun

I too have many years experience in the industry. I too have only an 2 year degree. I too used to have the same opinion. Then I realized it was just as easy to go and obtain the certifications that I was proficient at: A+, MCSE, CCNP, PMP. Sure, it was a bit of an investment but now I can pick and choose offers because of my skills, credentials, and the fact that I speak plain ol' English. Tough up, get a cert (or two), and the offers will be there.

ZenWarp
ZenWarp

Did you catch the expose from the programmers guild that was on y-tube with the law firm telling clients how to exclude US applicants in order to bring in H1B's? I am sure we have all been there and run through the required list and did not have one only to be excluded because of that!! or the much over stated "well your over-qualified for this position" now if that is not age discrimination what is!! as to the politicians who push the legislation for the likes of Bill Gates, we need to send them all home this next election and vote for any independent that runs as it is both the Republican and Democrat parties have sold out the US workers for to long so we need to replace them both.

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