IT Employment

How to sell your manager on a raise

Before you approach your boss with a raise request, have your case built around more than how long you've been there.

I have worked with some very intelligent people who happen to believe they are entitled to raises on the basis of seniority alone. They would be wrong.

Managing to not get fired is not the same as doing a good job. And, as a matter of fact, doing a good job is not the same thing as doing a raise-worthy job.

Before you step into your boss's office to have that all-important how-about-throwing some-more-money-my-way conversation, take a moment to answer these questions about yourself:

  • How do you contribute to the workplace and the company?
  • What problems have you solved for your department or the company lately?
  • Can you be counted on to complete duties as asked of you?
  • Do you have a good working attitude or would your colleagues rather undergo full-body dermabrasion than talk to you?

Once you get the answers, pack them up in your arsenal and lay them out for your manager.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

7 comments
cgandrad
cgandrad

Here is an example: in a previous career in accounting, I overheard the AR people complaining that they had to collect on refunds that should not have been sent to customers. I took it upon myself to audit all of the refunds before they went out, over a two month period, and sent most of them back; I saved the company from over-refunding $84K during this time, documented each instance, and got the 20% raise that I asked for (and they hired someone for $20K a year to audit all refunds before they went out). It???s not easy to do, but as long as you can quantify your contributions and accomplishments, you should be able to justify a raise (unless your company is pretty much already in the toilet).

ledpepper
ledpepper

Could someone give me an example of what an answer would be to the question: "How do you contribute to the workplace and the company?"

don.cagle
don.cagle

I have to agree with Bod D, the Old Old Technician (I am in the same situation (Old, Old, Old) Bob raisies a lot of interesting points, specifically about performance (I was even told once that beacuse the manager did not know better one year he gave me the highest level possible (using the 9 block matrix). The following year, ye told me that he should not have done that because no one gets a review that high, so that year I was down graded (whose fault was that, guess i shuld have seenit coming). Well, anyway since then, i have not received a merit raise, just a lump sum and stuck in the same job title level with no chance of advancement. i gues that is what is done to old, old, old, technicians. Wolf

bdonlen
bdonlen

Your opening sentences remind me of a boss, who, at my review, told me that I would not get a raise, because, even though I outperformed everyone in the office, I did not perform better than my last review. Your topic also reminds me of another boss who laid me off, and when I asked why, he told me he didn't know why. There's a whole bunch of planets that have to align before some people are given raises. They're not for everyone. Bob D Old Old Technician

ledpepper
ledpepper

Thanks guys, both good starts for me to form my answer. I plan on pitching these points for my justification. I think that bsharpe37's answer is more appropriate for question 1. Cgandrad, would your example be better suited for question 3. You identified a problem and took it upon yourself to implement a solution. If you agree with my understanding, I think I'm prepared to answer and use these questions in my appraisal.

bsharpe37
bsharpe37

"How do you contribute to the workplace and the company?" A good example would be: " Recently I upgraded the servers and helped train our employees on the new sharepoint system" That would be more of a Server admin type of answer however you will need to think in that manner. Something you did that helped the company upgrade or grow and what you did to help your users understand or utilize the change.

LightVelocity
LightVelocity

It is very likely that all your peers have moved up a level and you are left to contest with a fresh set of newbies. The assessment seems fair.

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