IT Employment optimize

How would you score on a "burnout" test?


In an article on the site mindtools.com, I found this definition of burnout:"Burnout occurs when passionate, committed people become deeply disillusioned with a job or career from which they have previously derived much of their identity and meaning. It comes as the things that inspire passion and enthusiasm are stripped away, and tedious or unpleasant things crowd in."

Just reading that definition made me want to reach for the Prozac, but I think it captures the root of things. Speaking for myself, it is the crowding in of tedious tasks that are the greatest cause of burnout for me. I think deep down I have the constitution of an air traffic controller. I don't mind a lot of responsibility, a large workload, or urgent time crunches. I actually get revved up by them. But if you stick me with a bunch of tedious, rote tasks and I can feel my spirit dry up like a puddle of water in the desert.

Mindtools.com offers a burn-out self-test that is pretty interesting. It's an informal tool-not validated through controlled scientific tests-but it can be useful for exploring your own state of burnout. Check it out here.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

5 comments
mcarpenter25
mcarpenter25

Uh oh... I scored 60, which placed me in the "You're definitely burned out" category. Course, I pretty much knew that. I use to be very punctual and happy to go to work, getting in 10-15 mins early everyday, chit-chatting with coworkers, and saying good morning to my users/customers. Now I'm in 20-45 minutes after my start time, and I just dread going in. I moved on to a higher paying job, but all of my coworkers and management are in another state. That leaves me alone here to talk to myself, or expose my wife to my user problems when I get home. I am still considered ?the new guy? after eight months here, so I don?t really have a place or the privacy to vent my frustrations. I am at a point where continuing my certifications and education in this field just aren?t appealing anymore. Perhaps it?s time to retrain to be a sanitation engineer.

dobbinsm
dobbinsm

I am right where you are at. I have been at this job 10 years. The main thing is that it doesn't seem like the high mucky-mucks that got you (and helped you to get) where you are, don't want to get your back when they are supposed to. It's like they are afraid of making waves and loosing their jobs. I don't know, but, it is very frustrating to say the least. There are a lot of things I would like to study and advance on, but, it makes me think, 'Why should I even bother anymore?' They are the ones that wanted me where I am, but, when it comes to their part of support, they are no where to found. By the way, I scored a 60.

koltpollo
koltpollo

I scored a 58. Which i also figured out that was what my problem was a couple of weeks ago. Happened to come across job burnout on the internet and basically answered yes to all the questions. I thought the feelings had strictly come from depression, not really thought about it actually being job burnout. Still not sure what to do about it. I'm ready to walk out but i don't have another job lined up. And at this point i want to do something so different from IT. Like be a stay-at-home wife and babysit my 2 step-grandchldren.

Wayne M.
Wayne M.

To me the test seems biased to reporting burnout. I answered the questions truthfully and almost all of my answers fell into the "Sometimes" category. Every job has its ebbs and flows, so how is it ever possible to answer "Not At All" or "Almost Never"?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We always used the length of the skid marks, although it's probably more accurate to use "before" and "after" tire circumferences.