Enterprise Software

Infographic: 2012 Salary and Skills report

Is your salary average for your geographic area and area of expertise? Check out this graphic form of the TechRepublic and Global Knowledge IT Salary and Skills report.

If you'd like a pdf version of this graphic to print out, you can download it here:

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

20 comments
sectech
sectech

General motivation for off-shoring labour is the salaries in other parts of the world... which would justify a really global survey, where gross and net compensation could be questioned, and e.g. like the " Big Mac Index "* could be compared. *The Big Mac Index is an informal index which relates the average time to work for a general Hamburger in a FastFood-store and is used to compare cost of living around the world.

VGRAUX
VGRAUX

At first it seemed to the point, but the graphics left no doubt. It's useless to people living outside of "America" and the dollar zone. The same for the E.U. would be nice, as there are more IT professionnals and more overall people than in the U.S.A.

aiellenon
aiellenon

the low pay rate on that chart is almost double what I make, and I have two of the certs on the chart, in additon to a few not on the chart.

progan01
progan01

Look at it. It's not a bell curve any more. Like other industries, IT is shaking out losers in favor of a handful of economic 'winners.' What makes those people making the top salaries so much more valuable than everybody else? How do they justify what they make versus what the industry or their company can afford? Not too long from now that curve will be half a bell curve -- the bottom swollen with toilers in the vineyards, the upper end hammered out to show the valuation of all those men in the high castle. Can we justify this? Can we permit this to happen and not let democracy collapse? I frankly don't see how. At some point the entire show is going to be about keeping the high end where it is, and if that has to come at the expense of everybody else, why, that is the way it must be. A law of Nature, which only the envious and the useless question. You should fear the day that happens. Your money won't help you when the world turns into Syria.

amakar
amakar

I found it interesting that the highest salary was a Six Sigma role within IT. I'd be interested in learning about the practical Six Sigma application to IT processes.

bob
bob

I find it interesting that CCNA Voice (one additional exam after achieving CCNA) has a base salary mean of over $97K. CCNP Voice requires 4 additional exams after CCNA Voice, and is a much more difficult certification. Since CCNA Voice is a requisite for CCNP Voice, I wonder if there is a false perception that CCNA-V alone is worth $97K, and whether most of the respondents with CCNA-V and higher salaries also have achieved CCNP-V certification. It's equivalent to stating that people with high school diplomas have a base salary mean of $X amount, when most of those with the higher salaries that do have their high school diplomas also have their doctorates - which is what really brings up the mean (and average). I think a simple way to show how one particular certification affects mean and average salary is to exclude any lower related certifications from the person's response. A complicated but interesting way would be to display dynamic charts that show all certifications for each respondent, something like a TED presentation.

Snufykat
Snufykat

Like they said "Global Knowledge" is the name of a company selling services etc not a description of the area the report covers.

omlyman
omlyman

But I still hold true that it would have been more pertinent and interesting if it included at least European salary data. We are all in this mess together and salaries are a good indication of where the economy is heading. America's data alone does not tell the whole story.

Stainlessman
Stainlessman

Global Knowledge IT Salary and Skills: Vaughn, you have incorrectly read the title of the report. "Tech Republic and Global Knowledge " = two entities that prepared the report on IT Salary and Skills. Global Knowledge is a Business and IT training company. The report does not refer to salaries and skills on a global scale. http://www.globalknowledge.com/

omlyman
omlyman

I am glad you raised this point. Even today in this world of inter connectivity via the web, the cheap international travel, interdependence on trade of oil and cheap Chinese goods, it seems Americans often forget that there is "the rest of the world." Fourteen years ago I transferred from the Boston to London office, and even in the same company Europe was treated almost as an afterthought. Sorry for the negativity because it is an interesting article, but sometimes living over here I am embarrassed to be an American. Lets think globally. It would have been far more interesting to get the global picture of what IT salaries were doing. It would tell the whole story.

steve
steve

I think Global Knowledge is the name of the company that did the survey, obviously it is just a name and means nothing

vaughndumas
vaughndumas

Considering that TR is read all over the world and you refer to "Global Knowledge IT Salary and Skills" one would assume that this is global. Alas, this report means nothing to the rest of the world.

Kenton.R
Kenton.R

The average experience of those responding caused me to raise an eyebrow. Looking around my office, we've got about 4 out of 35 IT folks that have been in IT for over 12 years. With the survey's experience level, it looks like they are getting a heavy number of senior managers, directors and C-level folks responding, but not many people "in the trenches." Because of the sample bias it would be unwise to use this as an example of average salaries. Keep in mind the only certifications on the list are ones that Global Knowledge has courses for. This infographic is primarily an advertisement. The message is if you get one of these certs (which they just happen to sell courses for) you too can make the big bucks. Yet another caveat: people don't always answer truthfully on surveys. bls.gov (Bureau of Labor Statistics) gives tax-accurate information, and you can dig down to just your occupational area in your metro area. You can't dig into exact job titles, though.

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

I'm a little taken aback by your post, progan01. I'd certainly like some clarification. In return I'll provide some of my thoughts to your questions. You ask how high salary earners justify being at the high end. It's simple, in my mind. Big earners in IT get their salaries by either: 1) Having a perculiar specialist skill that the company in question requires (and is willing to pay for) 2) They've proven themselves to be successful assets worthy of retaining with financial recompense that's hard to turn down. usually this is to discourage great staff from relocating to another company. Of course, i'm only giving a limited view here but in the main it's about skills, attitude and desirability to potential employers. If they don't want to pay for you, they won't - it isn't the employee that sets the salary bar. We're only worth what companies are willing to (and can afford to) pay. When you talk about the bell curve and how it's being hammered out you lose me. I'm assuming you're talking about graphing the potential earnings of IT professionals in certain roles (or is it with certain qualifications)? Who are the men in the high castle? IT staff with desirable and specialist skills? Or IT staff in positions that pay (often one and the same thing)? And what has this got to do with democracy? I don't believe the IT market is about keeping the high end where it is at all. This is a buyer's market and the skills in demand (and the difficulty in acquiring them) are what set the tariff. In 13 years I've not seen any manipulation of IT roles or salaries to keep the chaps at the top on their pedestal. If they don't keep up, they get knocked down. Still, that's just my experience and perception. As for money not helping when the World turns into Syria, I really have to press you on what you mean by that. You really have lost me, there. The way I read it now it seems that you are linking the IT earning potential of certain roes and skills to unsavory political regimes - I just don't see it myself.

GAProgrammer
GAProgrammer

As an American worker whose parent company is based in Europe, they do the same thing. I don't think that Americans have the "ego-centric" thinking on lockdown. It's just that businesses all around the world tend to think about their way of doing things. Some companies are just better at thinking globally than others.

MyopicOne
MyopicOne

...treated their European IT coworkers as afterthoughts, too. But after being acquired by a UK headquartered company, the standout difference is that the Europeans are still employed there while the domestic US employees took a 67% offshoring reduction in force. I think I know who's smiling these days...

Stainlessman
Stainlessman

Omlyman, I'm kind of embarrased that you're an American too.

GSG
GSG

Global Knowledge is the name of the company who did the IT Salary and Skills Report. So, it is still correct if a bit misleading to those who are not familiar with the company.

tech
tech

but Global Knowledge in an IT training company that was involved in the survey, it is not a global survey. Granted the poor sentence structure in the takeway does not make that clear (especially if you do not know that Global Knowledge is a company). Perhaps something like the following would have been better: Takeaway: Is your salary average for your geographic area and area of expertise? Check out this graphic form of the "IT Salary and Skills report" for the U.S. from TechRepublic and Global Knowledge .

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

Although the US-centric view offered here doesn't give us a Euro, Uk or other breakdown we can glean an insight from this as to potentially most valuable certifications, rankings of particular jobs in relation to one another and we get to see how our own salaries stack up against our US cousins. Although it doesn't handle our regions, it was still worth a look. Still, I do agree with you that the title was somewhat misleading, even though Global Knowledge is the name of the company producing the infographic rather than a statement of area covered. Not deliberate - just an unfortunate title, I'll wager. Do any of you fine people know if a similar survey was done in the UK or around Europe and if so, where can it be found?

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