IT Employment

Is IT a sexist industry, and is it growing worse?

Statistics indicate that fewer women are choosing IT as a career; is it a result of sexism in the industry?
Last week, Fox Business ran a story about women in technology, with host Stuart Varney musing that there might be "something about the female brain that is a deterrent from getting women on board with tech," and that keeps companies from putting women in positions of authority in technology companies.

Wow. The notion as stated on Fox is appalling at face value, but the imbalance is certainly real, and not just at the executive level; women are scarce at all levels in technology, it seems.

When I entered the field, unthinkable years ago, I was a junior programmer in a group of 13 that contained five women. Today, more than two decades later, the Bureau of Labor Statistics tells us that the percentage of women in a typical US IT shop has fallen below 25 percent.

In colleges around the country, the story is even worse: back in my day, more than a third of all computer science degrees were awarded to women; today, it's a disappointing 12 percent. And, ironically, among high school students, girls are more likely to be generally computer literate than boys (although boys are more likely, three-to-two, to have actually done computer programming).

Clearly, things are going in the wrong direction.

What's going on here? Why are women steering clear of technology careers?

Several theories are out there, trying to explain the imbalance. A study of Canadian high school students has shown that few young women are attracted to the field to begin with, citing a perceived life of isolation, which the media fuels - the dreaded geek factor. Fewer than five percent of young women arriving on undergraduate campuses do so with intent to pursue a computer science degree.

And once they've arrived on campus, there does indeed appear to be a sexist force at work: a 2006 study published by MIT Press asserts that undergraduate classroom environments tend to weed women out by emphasizing competition over cooperation, and that undergraduate laboratory environments, where teamwork is often taught, tend not to be inclusive of women.

Once in the workplace, women report 10 percent lower perceived receptivity to their input than their non-technical peers; they also report less perceived advocacy for their skills. It's not hard to see why little girls, dreaming of what they want to grow up to be, might seldom picture themselves arriving in a .NET developer's cubicle.

What are we missing out on, given this state of affairs? Let's set aside the obvious, that we're truncating nearly half the intellectual and creative potential we could be accessing, and note that one of the nagging deficits in the IT workplace today is diverse communications skills, in which women in general exceed men; or that turnover has become outrageously expensive, with the cost of replacing an IT professional now often exceeding the amount of a year's salary, and the note that women tend to move from job to job less frequently than men.

The big one here, however, is that the Information Age is burgeoning all around us, and we aren't just a service industry; we are shaping the world to come. The very forum in which you are reading these words right now has been a game-changer, not just in the performance of business tasks, but every aspect of our daily lives, social, political, and economic. The more input we have into the shape of things to come, the better off we all will be, as our technological future unfolds. To even partially exclude half of the human input we might introduce into the evolution of technology, company by company, in the coming years seems not only wasteful but foolish.

How we can move more firmly in the direction of rectifying this imbalance is something for an upcoming discussion.

About

Scott Robinson is a 20-year IT veteran with extensive experience in business intelligence and systems integration. An enterprise architect with a background in social psychology, he frequently consults and lectures on analytics, business intelligence...

104 comments
ladytechpacnw
ladytechpacnw

I left the tech industry due to sexism and being underpaid in the mid 90's. It also seemed before I left that the predatory corporate structure just fed the sexist environment I was in. In my personal experience, another deterrent to women entering and staying in tech is its hard to really attribute your treatment/hostile workplace until you are out of it and in another type of workplace to really compare the 2 different types of workplaces. Sometimes it takes years to really figure out if sexism was culprit since everyone wants to lie and deny sexism. I would do anything to enter any tech field again as long as I never had to hear another sexist comment form any man or woman - and If I get paid equally for the same work. Its the law to be PC at work so I dont have to endure a hostile workplace aka your sexist, racist, ageist, homophobia BS. Anyone who says these things aren't rampant in workplaces probably aren't working anywhere.

Just bayley
Just bayley

The irony here is that 5% of females enter COLLEGE (not the profession, mind you) with the intention of obtaining a comp sci degree. How is there sexism when 5% are even interested? Are male high school students (who, by definition, are not part of the IT/CS industry) persuading them not to? How absurd. This is clearly a lack of interest and has nothing to do with sexism. 


Fail.

brianbrill
brianbrill

Wow this article really has got people fired up.

whitewolf60
whitewolf60

Let me see...

Women currently make up 12% of Computer Science graduates, but just last week, I read an article stating that women currently make up two-thirds of new hires in the IT industry.

It certainly appears that sexism is at  play, though not against women, as this article implies.

Apparently, every female applicant that walks through the door (not to mention the ones who are actively recruited, i.e., never would have even walked through the door of their own volition!) is being hired.

techmichelle1
techmichelle1

Might as well ask why are there more women Nurses then Doctors.  Why are there more women nurse practitioners then physician assistants?  

Good affordable online programs for adults are hard to find.  I still do NOT have a good and affordable online IT certificate or degree program to share with my gal friends.  

There is a lot of money made in adult education and there are a lot of the programs that offer financing.  Only that financing depends on you getting a decent job and a lot of people don't.  There are lots of jobs that offer training once you are hired, course you have to get hired first.

My friend did a master gardener program, low initial upfront cost and you have to volunteer as you do the program.  At the end you have a certificate and its paid for.  

If anyone knows of a program please let me know.

cpetit
cpetit

The entire concept of the article is meaningless.  We are taking one clear result "There are not many women in IT" and somehow we can clearly infer the reason millions of women made this conscious choice is sexism?

I don't disagree that, to some extent, sexism may be a factor, but it would be like saying "There are not many male nurses" means there is sexism against men in that field, and that is the primary reason men don't enter the field.

I think there could be a long list of reasons each of the millions of women make this choice, such as "Don't want to work long hours and weekends," to "My passions don't revolve around computers."    For example, my sister works in finance, does a great deal of work with computers (DB programming and analysis for financial systems), but on the surface, and in a labor report, she would not be listed in IT.  

If asked why she didn't choose IT, she'd say "Finance makes me more money."  

My point is we can't take one clear result and somehow infer the primary reason millions of people made that result.

Do I believe there is sexism in IT?  To a degree, in some places, yes.  Do I believe that is the reason there aren't more women in IT?  No.  Do I believe it is getting more sexist?  No.

mad tabby
mad tabby

When I was going through school, most of the women that were in our first year classes were actually majoring in something else and just needed a couple of computer classes. By fourth year, we were down to maybe 3 in the whole class. Should we claim that there's sexism from the teachers and other students that drove them out? I don't think so.

As for on the job, the only sexism I have ever "been a victim of" has been from the clients, not from the tech people. And if someone wanted one of the "real techs" (i.e. men) to work on their computer, they could pretty much kiss it goodbye for a week or so. The guys had my back.

boucaria
boucaria

 I work ( term used loosely ) in security, just researching ( read, I summarised the summarys of summaries done by people in emails ) and I hate it. I just want to sit down, work on a box, get it running again, replace the part, work with which-ever help section, and then away we go. Bug fixing is my thing, and I have enjoyed the PC/Desktop support for 25 plus years. If you have a knack for it, then you should be allowed to stick with it, and get paid for your expertise and experience. Male or female; I have seen some technicians who start in support and then move to policy writing, and many female technicians like the move , since it is an extension of what they did as a desktop support person. Different people develop differently. Some managers don't read DILBERT but they still seem to be clones of the various characters within that eerily prescient storyboard of the IT sub-realm ( even the various economic trolls in hell :-) ; we need a new animated version of DILBERT, IMO. I Love the clients, the customers, and the people I have helped, PC support is a great area. I wish I was back there.

boucaria
boucaria

Citing FOX as a source is not surprising; it is conservative and for the most part it usually comes out as combative in most issues. I am intrigued that one person concludes that Aspergers leads to more males being in areas like IT, sure makes sense. But it would also be odd that one should expect some consistent "good behaviour" as some articles in tech Republic talk about. Its more likely that IT techs are off the wall than most other industries in my experience, fastidious in  appearance, even OCD, but not well behaved. Anyway, as for IT staff who are female, most of my friends in IT are Network Architects, and also work in areas with advanced mathemematical skills, as well as  designing web pages. But the females who are managers  in IT, when they "manage" other females in IT, the cat fights are appalling. And when I have just wanted to work in Desktop, not to work in areas they term more advanced, or make me be a supervisor/manager, I don't want to because I get a buzz out of fixing issues with PCs, etc., and I have worked with Telephony systems as well, and yet because I have a degree in a non-maths area, and some study in Law, well I get lumped into supervisor/managment areas. I hate it.

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

Comments on this site have gone to the dregs these days.  8 or 9 out of 10 comments posted on virtually any subject are of the flaming nature.  I am amazed at the sheer amounts of free time all of these people have to waste these days.

There was a time when the TR forums was a place of challenging, stimulating and intelligent conversation predominately.  Now unfortunately, this appears to have become more akin to the ludicrous, vitriolic content witnessed throughout the Youtube comments.

Is this what Facebook exposure does to community?

erh7771
erh7771

It SHOULD be no surprise to people who've studied human behavior sciences and patterns that a reflexive "heck no" should be the response to this near trollish question. The question itself doesn't invoke a progressive sense of self reflection. Objectively speaking, anytime in human history that there is a near homogeneous anything of humans there's going to be some tribalism that not as inviting to "others" as people THINK they are. Human behavior is there has to be a conscience effort to INVOLVE (not just include) the non majorities...PERIOD.

The question shouldn't be about sexism but how the field itself could be more inviting to the non majority.

Asking the questions from a human behavior science perspective could garner more OBJECTIVE results than "who?!, not me or this is stupid"

reyco23
reyco23

Most IT jobs are outsourced to cheap, non-complaining and high quality foreign IT specialist. I think most women go to the medical industry over IT. It's outsource proof, no sexism, no ageism, less likely to suffer from obsolescence and people are afraid to die then you can price that more.

D-FER
D-FER

Give me a break. There are plenty of fields where women are predominant. Men and women are different!  What is wrong with that?  Tech Republic should not publish such inane garbage.

xangpow
xangpow

Its nice to see that the majority of people see Scott Robinson as the true farce he really is. 

cathi_w
cathi_w

In one word, PRIVILEGE!!!

It is pretty disgusting to have to wade through the garbage of the ignorant privileged to find a few decent and intelligent fellows.

Having been in IT for a couple of decades, it is always the same, struggling to be heard over the belligerent egos, no matter the outstanding quality of work, it is ALWAYS about . . . .

The Good Ol' Boys, well indoctrinated in the control by fear patriarchy.

I am just proud and happy that my own daughter is also going into another male dominated profession. We continue to struggle to be heard, we are made fun of, then, we WIN!!!

CodeCurmudgeon
CodeCurmudgeon

I'm sure there are things like media stereotypes and the like involved, but the sheer amount of experimentation required to become fluent with so many technologies is a pretty substantial deterrent to women who want to do anything but spend their lives fooling with technology.

Back when I started in the age of dinosaurs, you could count on the documentation. If it said a compiler or other product would do something, it would and if it didn't it almost certainly wouldn't. Programming was more like an applied branch of mathematics. Nowadays, due to really poor documentation standards, programming is more like an experimental science, where you test hypotheses to see if they work. Of course at an hour or more per run, nothing would ever have managed to get done if you couldn't have counted on the documentation in those days. After midnight you might (just might!) get results back in as little as ten or fifteen minutes.

Back then I wouldn't have put up with the sheer amount of fooling around with a product/compiler/interpreter/framework it takes now, Indeed, the inadequacy of documentation is still a source of frustration for me. 

I'm sure that also contributes to the problem of filling programming jobs: No one wants to hire anyone who doesn't have three to five years of experience with just EXACTLY the technology they use, 'cause it takes most people that long to really get up to speed on these ill-documented technologies.

pennid
pennid

You think it's sexist?  Should have been with me in 1980 -- that was sexist.

eric.p
eric.p

Of the few women I know who have chosen to work in IT, some of them are very talented and do a great job, just like some of the men in IT do.  It's not at all about sexism, especially in a day and age when employers jump all over themselves to try to not appear sexist.  It's a simple recognition that, generally speaking, women are different than men and have different interests and abilities.  That's not to say that you won't find lots in common between them when you start comparing individuals, but the overall principle should not be surprising to anyone who's spent some time around persons of both genders.  I couldn't stand to read the whole article because early on I could tell where it was going and thought, "Here we go again - sigh!"

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

How many more of these moronic articles are we going to be subjected to? How many more times am I going to have to say "SHUT UP!!!" It's bloody stupid to suggest that women need to be about 50% of any career field. Who sets and enforces such lunatic standards? The government, that's who. Do we want them involved in even more areas of our lives? Haven't we learned enough with healthcare.flub (not my term, I lifted it from a blog)? We don't need some bureaucrat telling us where to work. Here's a thought: maybe they would rather do something else. Just leave us alone, we'll find our own careers. If you don't like the choices, too bad.

Sorry for the rant. I'm so sick and tired of the ridiculous focus on race and gender. I'm also sick of the "d" word (diversity). We don't need you nanny-staters telling us what to do, we will be just fine without you.

vechester
vechester

I just counted the people in our HR group.  28 women and 4 guys.  What's up with that??  Looks like a sexist hiring practice to me.

No not really.  Seems that women are more likely to choose an HR career than men.  Why?  I'm not sure but I'll bet it's not due to sexism.  It's because we are wired differently, we have different drivers, motivators, etc.

What is sexist is writing articles and other so-called journalistic pieces that have no scientific or heuristic evidence, but rather play on the emotions or feelings of the time.  How about we try to focus on truly innovative practices in IT that educate professionals about trends in technologies rather than obsessing with gender.

bratwizard
bratwizard

Maybe it's the WOMEN who are sexist, ya think?

I'm getting REALLY TIRED of reading this same crap over and over.

Not~SpamR
Not~SpamR

Lots of possibilities here. If women want to work in IT and are somehow prevented from doing so then there could be a problem. Where that problem lies on a scale with appropriate responses of "deal with it" at one end and "industry needs to urgently adapt" at the other is another matter. It's very easy to claim that people "feel belitted" or "think they are overlooked" but, to be brutal, welcome to reality. Any new person should expect to prove their worth regardless of gender.


As a man in IT I've had to put forward unpopular suggestions, I've had ideas routinely ignored for no apparent reason (I can only speculate the team leader didn't like them because he thought the fact the new guy made the suggestion  made him look weak) and so on. But as a man I don't get to cry sexism when I don't get what I want.

Another possibility is that women just don't want to work in IT. And that's fine too. If women don't want to work in IT (for whatever reason) is it really necessary to change the industry so that they do?

It's well known women are good at communication, usually better at it than men. Working with people is dynamic, people have different moods, shifting priorities etc, and keeping multiple people with conflicting requirements happy at the same time is a very specific skill. Sitting down and writing an unambiguous list of instructions to be followed to the letter in sequence is a very different skill.

I've worked with a small number of female developers and most of them were mediocre at best. I've also worked with female project managers and department managers and most of them were very good.

Perhaps the problem is the perception that a good programmer makes a good project manager, and a good project manager must be a good programmer.

richard233
richard233

If you want to know why women are not going into IT, perhaps you should start by asking them.

I can tell you why a number of men I know have gone into IT, its because its a field that offers us structure.  Lots of men happen to have a form of autism called Aspergers.  They used to just call us geeks, now it has a medical name.  So be it.

Computers are, for the most part, more consistent than people.  So, certain types of people who may not necessarily do that well with other people (socially) can often do quite well in hard science world where the world "makes more sense".  Women are generally considered more socially adept so it is not surprising they would perhaps avoid a field where the men are generally less so.

For whatever the reason, our field has become more chic.  Likely its the money.  You don't have people complaining there are not enough money in dirty low paying jobs, but since IT has attained a level of respectability lately there is push to get more women in.

I for one, welcome any woman that seeks this field out, assuming that she both has the innate ability needed to do the work and understands the nature of other people currently working in it.  IT tends to be a very meritocracy oriented area and "being nice" will not get you respected beyond a certain point.  The ability to act as an interface between those who do the work and those who need the work done is very desirable though, which is why I have had a number of successful women project managers over the years.  For the record, they were paid better than me, but they had to go to a lot of really boring meetings, so I don't begrudge them it at all. :-)

Liz_Smith
Liz_Smith

There is sexism in many industries and IT is no different. I have worked IT twice just out of college in 1979 - 1981 then again from 1996 to now. I am a woman. I deliberately took a break to be an at home parent, then went back to college and started over so I have a good understanding of changes. There have been gains, but not enough. It is often true that non-IT people prefer to ask a male for IT help and a lot of those non-IT people are the CEOs. I don't know if it is because they are just use to men being the IT 'guy' or if it is that men are still perceived as more intelligent. What I haven't seen change is the perception that men are more logical than women and that makes them better at IT across the board. Maybe it is that men live with the perception that if you are interested in computers there must be major relational issues, but then that is a sexist statement in itself.

nramotar23
nramotar23

My last job in IT (Aon), I had a woman mentor. She was excellent at what she did, and a great teacher at that. 

My current job in IT (Discover), I have two female bosses, and their boss is a female. 

Might just be my current situation, but I don't think this article relates to me at all. Many of the colleagues at my current job are women that work in information security and business technology. I think that in international comanies it is much more common to find women in IT, whereas smaller scale businesses might seem more sexist with their IT team.

rhyous
rhyous

No, it is not a sexist industry. It is just an industry that women do not prefer. That doesn't make it sexist.

But it is sexist to assume that just because women do not prefer IT, that the men in IT must be sexist.

QUOTE: "Clearly, things are going in the wrong direction."

What makes you assume that this the wrong direction? Just because *you* say so?
If women are making a choice to avoid IT, it is their choice. Who are you to tell them that their choice is wrong?

I am constantly telling my sister, who is half my age and just about to graduate high school, that Computer Science and IT are great for women. They are good high paying jobs and women can rise quickly (for those women with ambition) and yet at the same time IT has lots of work from home opportunities (which appeals to Mom's who want to stay at home). In fact, part time development is probably one of the highest paying part-time jobs a work from home mother could do.

But it doesn't seem to matter, she does not show any interest in CS or IT.
I have seen non-IT people prefer to talk to a male tech support engineer over a female tech support engineer, but that is not the people in IT, it is the regular people in the world who are calling in to tech support.

bblackmoor
bblackmoor

If fewer women are going into IT, I think that's probably because women are wising up to the fact that IT is the assembly-line job of the 21st century, where people are treated like easily-replaced machine parts and have virtually no job security, much less any opportunity for advancement. You say fewer women are going into IT? I say, "Good for them."

mullman71
mullman71

How many women do you find working on automobiles? In all my life I have never seen a female mechanic in any of the motor shops. Does that make the entire auto industry sexist? Maybe I'm a sexist for noticing? I suspect the author is simply trying to guilt people into aligning with his agenda. Think about it. In my 20-year career in IT I have never once witnessed a woman being disrespected. IT professionals throughout my career have been PROFESSIONAL and seeking solutions wherever and whoever they may come from. There are small pockets of bad behavior in EVERY industry.

lallen2064
lallen2064

I am a male and have worked in IT for 25 years primarily in a application development/maintenance oriented roles.  Most of my co-workers are males but it is probably 60-40.  The biggest change in the last 10-15 years is the IT jobs females are interested in holding.  Many are business analyst and project managers but there are still many in programming jobs.  My current employer is one of the largest IT firms on the planet with a significant portion of my management chain being female - with key roles like the CEO, CFO, division president, and loads of low-level project managers.  I do not see any Machiavellian schemes at work either.  Maybe there are firms out there with male bias, if so they will not profit from it as they are ignoring really smart and valuable people if they ignore women. 

Regards why women are not interested in IT as a career, I think it more accurate to ask why is the field in general shrinking.  More U.S. University students chose IT related fields of study in the 1990's than do today.  Maybe women are just smarter at staying away from a sinking ship - what with all the outsourcing and downsizing that the IT industry has seen over the years.

lcave
lcave

I've seen end users go to the least technical person because he's a he!  IT was a very egalitarian field and we changed the world (for better or worse)!


CusterL2000
CusterL2000

I have been an IT veteran for more years than I'd like to admit to as well. Growing a career from infrastructure design/implementation to ERP selections/implementation then on to IT audit. I was one of a very few women in a male dominated industry (Public Accounting). It worked well for me, allowing me to make my own path. But as it does for so many of us, life changes, and in my case the travel that was so exciting and fun in the beginning of my career was becoming an issue. New women hires were struggling with the road warrior expectations. As an IT auditor, I worked with several wonderful and talented women CIOs that equaled in number to the men CIOs.

I have recently changed careers but am still in an IT role as liaison between accounting and IT. This is where I have found there to be a gap in employee supply where the IT background is as strong as the accounting background. Between being a former controller and a Director of IT Risk Advisory Services the ability to mix the two is rare and invaluable. We need to be asked to present at more career days to let the girls know what all they can do and the fun they can have in IT. I agree with IT-b there is nothing as satisfying as that "woo hoo" moment when all of the pieces come together.

IT is a great field, with lots of options (not just development), we just need to get the word out.

mullman71
mullman71

Painting with a pretty broad brush aren't you? While there may be small pockets of bad behavior here and there in EVERY industry I think it is intellectually lazy to paint the entire IT industry as sexist.

mtnman28715
mtnman28715

'Clearly, things are going in the wrong direction.' - says who? Are the opportunities not there for women in IT? Are girls/women being told they can't be an IT professional? I think not. If so, then yes, that needs to be addressed. But if the opportunities are there and women just aren't choosing IT then there is no fault or blame to be assigned. Nor is there a need for a push to recruit more women simply to have more women in IT or any given career.

johnpinna
johnpinna

It is simpler than that.

I think we can all accept that fact that men and women are different (Time magazine was surprised a few years ago about that LOL).

Good technologist have to have the desire to experiment/tinker/explore with the technology they use.  In my 25+ year career I have only seen a few women that have that desire.  Whether we are talking development, infrastructure, etc - desire to experiment is very important.

This doesn't mean women are not great in technology roles.  Project Management is an area where women excel.

That shot at Fox News was stupid...


M Wagner
M Wagner

I am not sure that the issue is about sexism but I do think that competition plays a role in the discussion.  By nature, most men are more competitive than most women.  This "difference" plays a role in every aspect of human activity. 

Studies have shown that parents (both male and female) have different expectations of their male children than they do of their female children. 

From my own experience though (after 33 years in IT), I have to say that women bring as much, if not more, to the table than their male counterparts.  I work in a University environment and while, even in an academic setting, men out-number women by a large margin.  The number of women managers here is fairly high - and those women managers are general more competent than their male counterparts. 

For instance, our deputy CIO is a women.  So are some of our Associate VP's and directors.   

Frankly, I am very happy to have a women's perspective in an IT environment.

xangpow
xangpow

I think it is quite obvious Scott Robinson has no idea what he was writing about. If you ask me, his article failed when he said " Fox Business ran a story..." Anyone with a brain knows that nothing good comes from FOX. So it was quite obvious now that he just needed people to come to his website. That he has accomplished, but that is the ONLY thing he has accomplished. 

IT-b
IT-b

It's not sexism.  Maybe there is sexism in some places where some people work, but I think it happens in any industry. There are occasionally people that do not have the proper respect for their peers, but I work in an IT department with about 50/50 men to women.  10% of our developers are women, but not because we do any particular screening.  I was the only one for awhile, but just because qualified candidates didn't happen to be women.  We don't screen based on any criteria other than experience and potential, and our female developers (and all other IT staff) are treated with great respect.

I think too many people want to put social labels on everything.  I think IT is hard to sell.  It's hard to tell someone who has never done it, what your day is like as a developer, or even harder - BA.  It's hard to show a teenager that while you were up during the night releasing new features, you just helped the company make a lot more money, or improve the user experience.  What they see is that mom didn't get to sleep Sunday morning and that seems bad.  It's hard to show the creativity necessary to design a great database or great code architecture that's scalable for the next enhancement that they haven't thought up yet.  It's hard to describe what anyone means by "gathering requirements".  

I don't know why women don't want to be developers.  I like it.  I've worked with many great women developers, and they liked it.  Once they do it, they're not trying to get other jobs to get out of it, but I think it's hard to show the satisfaction you get out of it, and why it's worth it to work after dinner to finish up that last piece and verify that it's working the way you expected it to, and having that little "woo hoo" that comes with the success that day.

So somehow we need to start being able to show what IT is.  It's easy to imagine what a teacher does, because they've seen it.  It's easy to imagine what a chef does, because you can see it.  It's easy to imagine what a nurse does, or a doctor.  Maybe men are more driven by earning potential than women...IT has that, and that's easy to prove on paper.  I hear a lot more of the men talking about pay increases than the women, so maybe the drive just isn't there to seek out a well-paying career and hope you like it.

How can we sell the benefits that are beyond the money?  That's the trick.


 

 

snapdad
snapdad

 It is competition not cooperation that creates the best products and companies in the world. Face it Men and Women are different. Our programming staff is 3:1 male, our IT staff is 100% male, our project manager staff 100% female. 

bilbosfeet
bilbosfeet

Another bullsh*t article claiming women are being oppressed. 

Competition over cooperation? What the hell do you think college is about? It's not about holding hands, trust-falls, and singing kumbaya. It's about smashing the curve and rising above the mean.

It's like this... Women aren't going into the field because THEY DON'T WANT TO. It's that easy. They are simply not interested. It doesn't have to be any more difficult than that. 

Stop making excuses and bullsh*t rationalizations in an attempt to push third-wave feminism on the masses.

rmycroft2000
rmycroft2000

Perhaps it might be that the industry is flat out overly demanding and the jobs are here today and gone tomorrow.  And let's not even mention the insane rate at which the skills of today become complete and utter toast tomorrow.  Personally I am not sure why, other than the salaries, anyone really joins IT at this point.

mudpuppy1
mudpuppy1

That's because we are tired of seeing this bovine fecal matter.

RobinHahn
RobinHahn

Oh yeah, it's "great" to see that male privilege still holds top position in IT, as you've just proved with your comment. :-/

Indeed, the comments on here thoroughly support Scott's premise.

BTW, that "majority of people" you refer to is coincidentally all male. I don't think that's all that much of a coincidence, myself.

Also, I'm a male nurse working in a predominately female profession: we're members of the lowest-paid profession (and most trusted by the public) anywhere. Also not a coincidence.

RobinHahn
RobinHahn

Good luck getting any of these privileged males "getting it"... privilege blinds one to injustices prepetrated by that privilege. Walking that mile in another's 'moccasins' might help a bit, but we're talking upbringing, a whole cultural support-system for that privilege. It's not getting any better, either.


I know: I directly see the results of male privileges exercised over women in my line of work (nursing). It is disgusting.

atkinsonphillip
atkinsonphillip

@vechester I agree pepes. As a man I'm sick to goddamn death of everyday reading about the poor downtrodden female gender. Plenty of industries are stacked with woman. I studied to be a Physiotherapist and there were a handful of men in my cohort. Was there any bleating about the paucity of men? Not a word. Only when it suits does this sexist nonsense get peddled at to why woman aren't 50 percent of the workforce in a particular industry. Men and woman are different. Get that in your heads. 

They don't ride race bikes, build monster trucks, sigh up to be a diesel mechanic. Who the hell invented the nonsensical concept that we are the same. Vive la difference? And don't call me misogynistic.  I love my mother, my sister, my partner. I respect their ways and seek their counsel. But I'm a man and we are different.

sissy sue
sissy sue

I agree.  Certainly there is discrimination in the workplace and in other situations, but continuously playing the victim card or reinforcing the stereotype that certain populations cannot succeed on their own merit without help from some Sugar Daddy (like government) is counter-productive.  People will be people, and you can't change narrow-mindedness through quotas and political correctness. 

I think we (the populations that are discriminated against) would be much better off without champions like the author of this piece lamenting our short-comings and the obstacles that hinder us.  Instead, we as individuals can only do the best we can.  Those who are open-minded will accept us for what we are, not for our gender or ethnicity.  Those who are too opinionated to see our merits will ultimately be the ones who lose out.

Not~SpamR
Not~SpamR

@vechester Maybe we need a task force to look at ways of making careers in HR more appealing to men, perhaps some affirmative action and guaranteed interviews for men who meet the criteria.

QueenPendragon
QueenPendragon

Yeah, the male AS/Asperger's do tend to outnumber the women. We're out there but less common. Perhaps that's what attracts me to IT even as a woman.

QueenPendragon
QueenPendragon

Not everything from Fox is bad. People just dislike it because it isn't liberally biased like the other stations, but conservative.

vechester
vechester

@Not~SpamR @vechester Yes, in fact we need to go around to all the high schools and start indoctrinating young men to be more interested in "Human Resources" and less interested in football, paint ball, trucks and of course sci-fi:)

Such a waste of space for what could have been a good article on new disaster recovery tools and trends, new uses of cloud storage, virtualizing the recovery of critical  IT components of a business.

Instead we find ourselves worrying over who in our IT team has what genitalia.  It is that ridiculous!

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