IT Employment optimize

Is this development job a good fit for you?

All too often, people take a job that just is not the right fit, and the result is uncomfortable at best. So how do you decide if a job is really right for you?

One of the more overlooked steps in the process of getting a job is deciding if the job is right for you. Sure, when you are on the job hunt, any offer that meets your compensation needs is worth considering. But all too often, people take a job that just is not the right fit, and the result is uncomfortable at best. So how do you decide if a job is really right for you?

  • Project management style: are they using Agile or a waterfall technique? Neither is "right" and neither is "wrong" but I can say without a doubt that not everyone is equally suited to both. If the company's project management style does not fall into your comfort zone, there will be a problem.
  • Quality of governance/process: a company that does not use basic tools like source control and is not working to solve those shortcomings is one you do not want to work for.
  • Managerial questions: does the management team have a firm understanding of the development process, or will you be facing an uphill battle dealing with them?
  • Business model: not every business model is well suited to keeping the developers happy. You should try to learn as much as you can about the business and how it makes decisions to see if you will like working there long term.
  • Training, resources, and support: are you going to get what you need to do your job with as little friction as possible? Or will you be plopped into an office with junk equipment, no help, and no idea of what to do?
  • Tools: development tools can be very expensive. Even if you stick to open source or free tools, you may well need some expensive servers to work with. If the new employer tries to be cheap on the tools, your job is likely to be frustrating.

Are there other criteria you use to decide of you are a good fit for a job? Let us know in the forum.

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

5 comments
salnaib
salnaib

In today's world knowledge is the key with proven practice. Even practice is hard to find for new grads. being proactive and volunteer to get those skills sharpened and who knows you might spin off company and doing what you love to service community. Software jobs means innovation, customization to end-user needs is hot esp. if you save a lot of money for clients. Above all social and emotional intelligence skill set is vital to survive and drive and sustain business.

Nesher
Nesher

How many people can afford to be selective? I would think that today most folks are thrilled just to get an offer, and won't be all that concerned (initially) with "details".

minstrelmike
minstrelmike

When do you notice all this stuff? Not in the first interview. Not even in the first week on the job I suspect. Seems to me this is a lot like marrying someone. You don't want to end up with a major discrepancy in values, but you can't figure that out in just a couple dates. Doesn't seem to me like companies give you enough of a dating period. Obversely, what do you know about yourself? If you've only ever worked in an agile shop, how do you know waterfall will be bad for you? That's like saying you don't like brunettes or redheads without knowing anything about hair dye. Or without ever first trying a natural redhead ;-)

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Almost all employers talk a good game, but you can often spot discrepancies between the message and the actuality. One of my first time pointers, is how many hoops do they make you jump through to simply get an interview and find out what the real deal is. One for instance, sent me a job application form which had sections for secondary schooling and a half page box titled Why do I want this job? I don't mind self interest, I don't even mind being economical with the truth, I don't suffer fools at all though.

richard.s
richard.s

I agree with Justin's pointers, but there's an extra area which can be very important: Do feel comfortable with the new company's: - Ethics? - Business? - Products?