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IT skill sets in demand for 2011

Time to hone up on your business skills since that is something firms will be looking for in IT job candidates.

The Robert Half Technology 2011 Salary survey has just been released. Yesterday, I talked about the certifications that are in demand. Today, I'll talk about the specific skill sets that employers say they desire most in job candidates.

While specific requirements for IT jobs vary across industries and region, there are some skill sets that the survey revealed consistent need for:

Programming -- Specifically, knowledge of .NET, Java, mySQL, PHP, Silverlight, Flex as well as portal technologies like SharePoint. A business mindset -- Mentioned for several years running, the need for this skill set is not going away. Organizations are yammering for those people who understand how technology supports broader business objectives and who have the management skills to make them happen. Technological proficiency -- Those with knowledge of one or more of the major ERP packages are in demand since firms are seeking to maximize their existing information systems or to restart initiatives that were put on hold last year. Security -- Companies want people who can keep their information safe and secure. Infrastructure support -- Companies are hiring support pros and PC technicians, primarily on a project basis, as they upgrade their OSs. Networking -- With implementations of virtualization and cloud computing technology, firms are seeking IT pros with a blend of server, software, and networking skills. Electronic medical records -- Health care firms across the U.S. are in need of IT pros with the expertise to install and support medical records software.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

7 comments
cezzro
cezzro

Good article! Apart from this, I suggest everyone to create their personal skill badge at http://www.skillbadge.com to tell the world what they are good at and to get seen!

bfpower
bfpower

The EHR transition is a big deal in my sector, in more than just EHR systems. For instance, movement toward EHR means that a lot of other non-EHR information systems are making transitional steps to interface well with EHRs. For me, this everything from conducting training sessions on password complexity to documenting and managing the Risk Assessment required to meet the federal criteria for assistance with the EHR transition. Lots and lots of new work - but only for people who can understand the intersection of 1) government regulations, 2) the healthcare ecosystem, and 3) technology. It's a niche, but one I'm very glad to be a part of.

jjosef
jjosef

I can't believe you don't have Ruby (on Rails) in there. It is probably one of the most sought after skill sets currently.

raykaville
raykaville

Thanks for the link. It was a complete waste of time unless you're looking to get into a political discussion. Minor interesting opinions, but mostly rhetoric. Bottom line, once someone starts to make money with a new technology it's here to stay till that cash stops rolling in. I guess if you're looking at Electronic Health/Medical Records, a good place to be would be at the doctor/IT interface point to make sure valid and useful info is being collected.

cpatch
cpatch

I've looked at hundreds of software developer job postings over the past few months and not a single one that I can recall has mentioned Ruby. It may be in demand in Florida, but it's not on the West Coast. C#, .NET, and Java are far and away the most in demand out here, with iOS also very high.

lordimpaq
lordimpaq

Is it only in the US or World wide? where i come from this is just 70% true.

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